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Tag: Samuel Richardson (1-1 of 1)

On the Books: Amy Poehler to host World Book Night

Amy Poehler will be hosting World Book Night this year! The comedian has already sharpened her hosting chops at this year’s Golden Globes. (“Welcome to the 71st Annual Tina Fey and Amy Poehler’s Lee Daniels’ The Butler Golden Globe Awards.”) We can expect some big laughs on April 23rd when the star joins a coalition of publishers, bookseller, librarians and 25,000 volunteers to give away 500,000 books to people who otherwise don’t have access to reading materials. “I’m thrilled to be part of World Book Night,” the actress told UPI. “People who read are people who dream, and we connect through the stories we live and tell and read.” The event’s executive director, Carl Lennertz, is equally happy to have Poehler on board. “This news is the icing, cherry and candles on the year three WBN cake,” the director said. Special paperback editions that will be given away this year are Malcom Gladwell’s The Tipping Point, Carl Hiaasen’s Hoot, and Solomon Northrup’s 12 Years a Slave. [UPI]

Two hilarious letters written by America’s favorite recluse Harper Lee are being auctioned in Los Angeles tomorrow. The first is written to a Dr. Engelhardt in 2005 and she complains about the To Kill A Mockingbird tourism that plagues her in her small town of Monroeville, Alabama: “You think my home is my castle? No, sir!” She also mentions her poor penmanship: “excuse my penmanship”, which she says she has ” a feeling that it’s cater cornered on the page.” In the second letter, she thanks her friend Doris Leapard “for all the things you do, have done, and will do. (This reads like Nixon’s pardon.) …” It really is a loss that she doesn’t give interviews, since they would obviously be hilarious. [The Guardian]

Indie bookstores are a dying breed. (Bookstores are a dying breed.) But just to remind you that this is a serious problem, here’s an article in the New York Times about bookstores being forced out of Manhattan, a city that used to be a beacon of literary haunts. So many classic booksellers have shuttered in the past decade and the ones that are open struggle to stay that way. So support your indie booksellers! Don’t buy everything on your Kindle…

Check out this great article in The New Yorker by Stacey D’Erasmo on the “Proteus” nature of female artists. “Proteus, who assumes many shapes but is subject to none, is a productive figure for the artist to steer by.” She attributes this tendency to women and the Other. “There’s a doubt, a shadow, a friction between the inner world and the perception or the shape of the exterior container. That shadow between feeling and form, which may begin in gender, releases artistic energy all one’s life. The paper is always torn, the eyes always peer out from within borrowed shapes.”

Lastly, spare fifteen minutes to peruse this “He loves me, he loves me not” quiz based on Samuel Richardson’s 18th century novel Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded. “If you’re asking yourself, ‘Does my recently-orphaned master like me, or does he like me like me?’ then you’re in the right place. It can be hard to tell if a libertine’s just being friendly (he shakes hands with all of his housemaids’ breasts like that!) or if he’s starting to think of you as someone special (he hides under your bed while you’re at church, even on Whitsuntide!), especially when he owns you and all of your labor for the next seven years.” Haven’t we all been there? [The Toast]

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