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Editor: Gabriel Garcia Marquez left unpublished manuscript

A book editor says novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez has left behind an unpublished manuscript that he chose not to print while he was alive.

Cristobal Pera, editorial director of Penguin Random House Mexico, told The Associated Press Tuesday that Garcia Marquez’s family has not decided whether to allow the book to come out posthumously, or which publishing house would get the rights. Garcia Marquez died at his home in Mexico City on April 17. READ FULL STORY

On The Books: Claudia Rankine wins poetry prize; the trials of building Noah's Ark and Shakespeare's Globe Theater

Jamaican poet Claudia Rankine won the Poets & Writers’ Jackson Poetry Prize this year, which comes with a sweet award of $50,000. Rankine has published four books of poetry; her last was 2004′s Don’t Let Me Be Lonely: An American Lyric. She told The New York Times that she plans to publish a follow-up in October called Citizen. “Both books reside in the realm where one’s attempts to negotiate a day are complicated by racial interactions,” Ms. Rankine said. “Where ‘Lonely’ looked at the role of media in our private lives, ‘Citizen’ attempts to understand how black people, like tennis star Serena Williams, negotiate racism on a public stage.” Rankine was elected Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets last year and currently teaches at Pomona College. [New York Times]

The Financial Times ran a story (on their salmon pink website to match their salmon pink paper) about the battle for Shakespeare’s famous Globe Theater. The Bard had a little known nemesis, the maniacal Lady Elizabeth Russell, who lived next door to his playhouse. She was your typical belligerent neighbor who’s always snooping in your business. To take her down a notch, “the playwright had lampooned members of the Dowager’s coterie in Henry IV, Part 1,” and he skewered her husband as a drunk buffoonso Russell was out for payback. She turned many of Shakespeare’s friends against him and pushed through a petition to have the Globe shuttered, but the story ends with an ironic twist – classic Will! – so you have to finish the article to get the joke of the whole thing. [Financial Times]

 

See the cover of David Mitchell's 'The Bone Clocks' -- EXCLUSIVE

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Check out the cover of David Mitchell’s new novel The Bone Clocks, which will be hitting shelves on September 9th. Mitchell, a two-time Booker Prize finalist, is the author of five novels, including Cloud Atlas, The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet, and Number9Dream.

As with his previous books, this new story will feature mystical elements and skip through time and space. For more plot detail, Random House released this description:

Following a scalding row with her mother, fifteen-year-old Holly Sykes slams the door on her old life. But Holly is no typical teenage runaway: a sensitive child once contacted by voices she knew only as “the radio people,” Holly is a lightning rod for psychic phenomena. Now, as she wanders deeper into the English countryside, visions and coincidences reorder her reality until they assume the aura of a nightmare brought to life.

For Holly has caught the attention of a cabal of dangerous mystics—and their enemies. But her lost weekend is merely the prelude to a shocking disappearance that leaves her family irrevocably scarred. This unsolved mystery will echo through every decade of Holly’s life, affecting all the people Holly loves—even the ones who are not yet born.

A Cambridge scholarship boy grooming himself for wealth and influence, a conflicted father who feels alive only while reporting from occupied Iraq, a middle-aged writer mourning his exile from the bestseller list—all have a part to play in this surreal, invisible war on the margins of our world. From the medieval Swiss Alps to the nineteenth-century Australian bush, from a hotel in Shanghai to a Manhattan townhouse in the near future, their stories come together in moments of everyday grace and extraordinary wonder.

David Foster Wallace's estate opposes biopic 'The End of the Tour'

Relatives of David Foster Wallace say they’re opposed to the upcoming film The End of the Tour, which is based on David Lipsky’s 2010 book Although Of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip with David Foster Wallace.

In his book, Lipsky recounts accompanying Wallace, the author best known for his 1996 novel Infinite Jest, on his book tour.

Production on The End of the Tour, written by Donald Margulies, directed by James Ponsoldt (The Spectacular Now), and starring Jason Segel as Wallace and Jesse Eisenberg as Lipsky, wrapped in late March.

READ FULL STORY

'Eat, Pray, Crib': take a virtual tour of Elizabeth Gilbert's million dollar home

So I guess when you write a best-selling memoir and it’s made into a movie starring Julia Roberts as you, you can pretty much say that you’ve made it. Elizabeth Gilbert has this luxury. I thought she’d already left the trappings of modern American success behind — including the country home — but apparently she’s leaving that behind again because she just put her 1869 Italianate Victorian in Frenchtown, NJ on the market for $999,000. (Probably for something even more luxurious). Gilbert will lead you on a twenty minute virtual tour in a video she posted called “Eat, Pray, Crib.” She’s still riding the “live vicariously through me” wave.

Her press release describes the house as “a writer’s dream” because it has a “skybrary.” It’s very unfettered bohemian to have a skybrary these days. READ FULL STORY

On The Books: Aboriginal author Doris Pilkington Garimara dies at 76

Doris Pilkington Garimara, the Aboriginal novelist who wrote Follow the Rabbit Proof Fence, has passed away at 76 years old in Perth, Australia. Follow the Rabbit Proof Fence, her most well known book, was published in 1996 and tells the heart-wrenching story of her own mother’s life. As a young aboriginal in the 1930′s she was torn from her family and sent to a government “re-education camp,” but she broke free and spent nine weeks braving the Outback to return to her home. In 2002, the book was adapted into a film called Rabbit Proof Fence starring Kenneth Branagh. The success of Doris’ story helped draw attention to the aboriginal cause, and she used her fame to further promote reparations between natives and white Australians. The New York Times says that Doris was a member of the Reconciliation Committee and a principal promoter of National Sorry Day, an annual event started in 1998 to commemorate the government’s mistreatment of Aborigines.  [New York Times]

If you’re a vocabulary stickler, a strict constructionist for wordsmithing or just into useless apps, then you should be pleased to hear about this new app for Google Chrome that replaces all appearances of “literally” on webpages with the more proper usage of “figuratively.” So the next time one of your friends posts a status update like, “I’m literally perishing from the heat,” you’ll read “I’m figuratively perishing from the heat.” The caveat is that it will replace even proper usages of literally. So when I say that “I could literally kill someone for a coffee,” then you’ll think I’m kidding. It’s Monday – don’t cross me. [Slate]

Over at The Guardian, Elizabeth Edmondson is also getting into a huff over definitions. She’s taking aim at “literary fiction,” which she thinks is a crock. She argues that “Lit Fic” is just a fancy way of marketing books that posterity has decided are exemplary, while the original authors were just trying to entertain folks like the rest of us hacks. Agreed. [Guardian]

Ann Brashares, author of Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, has a new book coming out and it’s less “traveling pants” and more “traveling time and blood plagues.” Her publisher probably told her that dystopian blood plagues are very now. [NPR]

Fans have browbeat the Hugo Award judging committee into shortlisting The Wheel of Time, Robert Jordan’s 15 book, 4.5 million word epic series that a some Sci-Fi academics (What?) have slated as being “a long-winded Lord of the Rings.” Ouch. [Guardian]

 

Get a sneak peek at 'Firefight', Brandon Sanderson's sequel to 'Steelheart' -- EXCLUSIVE

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Brandon Sanderson, known for — among many other works — his contributions to the Wheel of Time series, won himself a lot more fans with his hit YA debut Steelheart, which set off the Reckoners trilogy. The action-packed sequel, coming Jan. 6, 2015, will continue David’s epic battle against the Epics. EW has the first look at the cover of Firefight (Steelheart will be getting a new look as well) and a preview from Sanderson himself. Read on for some cryptic answers to burning questions. READ FULL STORY

Carol Leifer talks life in TV sitcoms, from 'Seinfeld' to 'Devious Maids'

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Veteran TV writer Carol Leifer has tapped her storied Hollywood career as fodder for a new memoir, How to Succeed in Business Without Really Crying. She talks to EW about what it takes to succeed in an industry that’s so tough it isn’t funny. Jennifer Armstrong reports.

Carol Leifer’s career could be a mini-lesson in modern TV history. She started as a stand-up but segued into sitcoms by writing for her buddy Jerry on Seinfeld. From there, she talked her way onto the staff of The Larry Sanders Show, co-created The Ellen Show with future Arrested Development master Mitch Hurwitz, created her own sitcom (Alright Already), and even dabbled in reality in The Celebrity Apprentice‘s third season. READ FULL STORY

Official title and jacket cover announced for Hillary Clinton's book: 'Hard Choices'

Chelsea Clinton isn’t the only famous family member making the news — early this morning, Simon & Schuster released the official title, jacket cover, and description for Hillary Rodham Clinton’s book.

Hard Choices is an inside look at the challenges that Clinton faced during her tenure as secretary of state. Information about the book is also available at www.hardchoicesbook.com; the website will post updates on the book ahead of its publication date of June 10, 2014.

The full description from Simon & Schuster’s press release is below:

READ FULL STORY

George R.R. Martin reveals what a full-sized dragon looks like

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Yeah, that big!

George R.R. Martin has posted an excerpt from his upcoming companion book to his bestselling Song of Ice and Fire novels. On the author’s website, he released an entry from The World of Ice and Fire: The Untold History of Westeros and the World of Game of Thrones. The book is mega encyclopedia covering the events and historical figures that shaped the Seven Kingdoms and beyond.

The excerpt gives some background for fans of Daenerys Targaryen, setting the stage for the dragon-aided conquest of Westeros by her ancestor Aegon I Targaryen. But also intriguing is the accompanying illustration, which shows Aegon atop his dragon Balerion the Black Dread. Martin confirmed to EW the image accurately represents his vision for what a fully grown dragon will look like — can you imagine Dany riding one of these? (on Thrones, we’ve seen an adult dragon’s skull in season one, but the living dragons on the show are still adolescents). The book is released in October. Check out Martin’s sample.

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