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Tag: Publishing Biz (61-70 of 126)

Casey Anthony book: Publishers aren't biting

Back when EW asked book publishing insiders if they’d be interested in an Amanda Knox book, the answer was an unmistakable, resounding “Yes.” One prominent editor told us, “People vote at the bookstore when it comes to any big case. You need to ask, ‘Where is the court of public opinion on this?’ That’s who’s going to buy the account.” While in publishers’ eyes Knox is golden, the opposite can be said for Casey Anthony, the Florida mom acquitted of murdering her daughter Caylee. It’s safe to say that the court of public opinion finds Anthony guilty, and readers are, for obvious reasons, loath to hand money over for her book. TMZ called around to publishers yesterday and today, and here are some of the statements they received from the big houses: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Rebecca Skloot inks deal for new book, and more

++ With the enormous success of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, the sales of which continue to multiply, science writer Rebecca Skloot has landed a deal for a second book, this one about the “human-animal bond.” If Skloot can make a story about strain of cancer cells intensely human and engaging, I’m sure she can do the same with animals. No release date has been announced yet. Read more about the book on the author’s website.

++ Wham! Bam! Islam!, PBS documentary airing tonight, will center on a Kuwaiti psychologist’s efforts to promote The 99, a “comic book of superheroes who each exemplify one of the 99 qualities that Muslims believe Allah embodies, like generosity, strength and patience.” READ FULL STORY

Barnes and Noble removes Sandman, Watchmen, and other graphic novels from its shelves

My attention was caught this morning by a tweet from Neil Gaiman: “Really? Barnes and Noble will no longer sell Sandman or Watchmen?” It turns out to be true: The company was angered by DC Comics’ deal  with Amazon to sell 100 graphic novels –including Gaiman’s — exclusively on the Kindle Fire. So it ordered stores to begin stripping the DC books from their shelves. Later today, B&N issued a statement to CNN that said, in part,

“Regardless of the publisher, we will not stock physical books in our stores if we are not offered the available digital format…To sell and promote the physical book in our store showrooms and not have the e-book available for sale would undermine our promise to Barnes & Noble customer to make available any book, anywhere.”

Some Barnes & Noble stores — like the one nearest EW’s office — had completely removed the graphic novels in question by midafternoon. Other branches, like the one not far from my house in upstate New York, appear to not have heard the corporate message.

Has anyone seen this today at a Barnes & Noble? What do you think about it?

Amanda Knox book? What publishing insiders have to say

According to a recent LA Times poll, most American readers believe Amanda Knox should get a book deal.

So Shelf Life asked major players in the New York publishing world about the desirability of an Amanda Knox book. Although some of the editors and agents we reached out to were unwilling to comment out of fear of jeopardizing current or future book deals, the impression we got is something that’s been obvious all along: Pretty much every agent and publisher in town would love to make an Amanda Knox book happen.

Especially attractive to publishers is that Knox is a sympathetic figure without the “ick factor” of Casey Anthony, the other major headline-maker this year. READ FULL STORY

Should comic books emulate the TV biz? Plus: More reviews of 'The New 52'

Pop culture in September. A month of beginnings and renewal. A time when a certain sector of entertainment expends much marketing energy to not just psyche up the public about its products but get them excited about the very medium that delivers those products. We’re talking TV, of course, and the “new fall season” that’s imminent. But this month, we’re talking about the comic book industry, too. Last week, DC Comics began rebooting its entire line of comics via an initiative called “The New 52.” Ongoing hits like Action Comics (home to Superman) and Detective Comics (abode to Batman) restarted with new creative approaches, storylines, and creative teams. Launching with them: A bevy of new series, many starring familiar characters, returning to prime time comics the way TV stars of the past return in new vehicles. (‘Tool Time’ Tim Allen/Last Man Standing = Construction worker Alec Holland/Swamp Thing. Grunt-grunt!)

READ FULL STORY

On the Books Sept. 8: Borders execs seeking 6-figure payouts, Project Gutenberg founder dies

++ Borders Group Inc., in bankruptcy, is seeking six-figure payouts for the company’s top executives. When the corporate closure is final, more than 10,000 Borders employees will have lost their jobs.

++ Michael S. Hart, ebook inventor and founder of Project Gutenberg, died on Tuesday at age 64. A pioneer in digitizing books, his online library housed more than 36,000 texts as of June and added, on average, 50 new texts a week. READ FULL STORY

Man Booker Prize longlist revealed: Four first time authors make the cut

The announcement of the 2011 Man Brooker Prize longlist for fiction honored a mix of seasoned vets — like shortlist regular Julian Barnes, pictured — as well as four authors nominated for their first novels: Yvvette Edwards, Stephen Kelman, Patrick McGuinness, and A.D. Miller. The shortlist of six books will be announced September 6, and we learn the winner of the £50,000 prize on October 18.

See the longlist in its entirety below.

Julian Barnes, The Sense of an Ending (Jonathan Cape – Random House)
Sebastian Barry, On Canaan’s Side (Faber)
Carol Birch, Jamrach’s Menagerie (Canongate Books)
Patrick deWitt, The Sisters Brothers (Granta)
Esi Edugyan, Half Blood Blues (Serpent’s Tail – Profile)
Yvvette Edwards, A Cupboard Full of Coats (Oneworld)
Alan Hollinghurst, The Stranger’s Child (Picador – Pan Macmillan)
Stephen Kelman, Pigeon English (Bloomsbury)
Patrick McGuinness, The Last Hundred Days (Seren Books)
A.D. Miller, Snowdrops (Atlantic)
Alison Pick, Far to Go (Headline Review)
Jane Rogers, The Testament of Jessie Lamb (Sandstone Press)
D.J. Taylor, Derby Day (Chatto & Windus – Random House)

A new Swamp Thing, a new Frankenstein, and more: DC Comics will roll out more new #1s

DC Comics continues to roll out announcements of new first-issues featuring famous characters and creators in striking combinations. This morning we start off with two highly intriguing combos: Scott Snyder, who’s been doing such strong work on American Vampire, will write a new version of Swamp Thing, and Jeff Lemire, author of one of comics’ finest current books, Sweet Tooth, is taking on Animal Man. Since re-workings of Swamp Thing and Animal Man are so closely associated with other, earlier writers (Alan Moore and Grant Morrison, respectively), these re-re-imaginings are bound to be both fascinating and, perhaps inevitably, subjects of debate. READ FULL STORY

Glenn Beck to helm a new book publishing imprint with Simon & Schuster

For fans who are dreading the end of Glenn Beck’s daily Fox News show, there’s reason to celebrate; and for his detractors, something to groan about. Beck’s media empire won’t be shrinking any time soon: The conservative talking head has signed a deal with Simon & Schuster that includes the launch of a new book imprint called Mercury Ink, an extension of Beck’s production company Mercury Radio Arts. READ FULL STORY

On the Scene: The 23rd Annual Lambda Literary Awards

Some of the world’s finest LGBT writers and their admirers turned up at the School of Visual Arts Theater in Manhattan last night for the 23rd Annual Lambda Literary Awards. The ceremony, attended by celebrities like Bryan Batt (Mad Men), former New Jersey governor Jim McGreevey, TV icon Stefanie Powers and hosted by the hilarious Lea DeLaria (“rhymes with ‘malaria'”), honored exceptional queer-themed work in over 20 categories, and the night’s most distinguished honorees, three-time Pulitzer-winner Edward Albee and Scottish crime writer Val McDermid, received the Foundation‘s Pioneer Awards for paving the way for gay authors.

One of the highlights of the evening came when Tony Award-winning playwright Terrence McNally (Kiss of the Spider Woman) presented the Pioneer Award to Albee. “Edward has avoided gay subject matter to such a degree that people have wondered if he is indeed gay,” McNally said. “Well, I’m here to tell you, in no uncertain terms, that he is. I picked Edward up in 1959 at a party … I thought he was gorgeous and sexy.”

READ FULL STORY

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