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Tag: On the Books (1-10 of 178)

On the Books: Anti-Clinton book leaked to media under mysterious circumstances

The upcoming book Clinton, Inc.: The Audacious Rebuilding of a Political Machine had a well-prepared rollout in advance of its July 22nd release, including a splashy interview on The O’Reilly Factor. But over the weekend, writes The Daily Beast, “a prolific but mysterious rogue distributor who somehow got a copy of Halper’s book and blasted out a series of mass-media emails containing PDFs—or portable document formats—of the entire 317-page, 12-chapter volume.” The book is by Daniel Halper, an editor of the conservative magazine The Weekly Standard. No one’s sure how the leak happened, and it’s uncertain if the blame should go to hardcore Clinton supporters or right-wing Clinton-haters. [The Daily Beast]

Those Dungeons & Dragons nerds you mocked in middle school are busy becoming the greatest writers of our age. Everyone from Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and screenwriter David Lindsay-Abaire to Atlantic editor Scott Stossel credit the game for developing their storytelling skills. “It’s been a formative narrative media for all sorts of writers,” said Junot Díaz. [The New York Times] READ FULL STORY

On the Books: The biggest book publishers in the world are...

Publishers Weekly has released its annual ranking of the biggest book publishers in the world. Textbook publisher Pearson is no. 1, with $9.33 billion in revenue last year; other educational and professional publishers fill out the rest of the top 4. The largest trade publisher (and fifth overall) is Random House (now Penguin Random House) with $3.66 billion in revenue. The top 10 publishers accounted for 54 percent of all book revenue last year. [Publishers Weekly]

Today, people curate the flood of articles they want to read via Instapaper and Pocket, and post recommendations on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest, among others. In the 19th century, people used scrapbooks for the same purpose. The more you know! [Smithsonian Magazine]

The New York Times identifies a new group of writers: “African writers with an internationalist bent.” It includes Americanah author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Dinaw Mengestu, Helen Oyeyemi, NoViolet Bulawayo, Teju Cole, Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor, and Taiye Selasi. “Some writers and critics scoff at the idea of lumping together diverse writers with ties to a diverse continent,” the article reads. “But others say that this wave represents something new in its sheer size, after a long fallow period.” [The New York Times] READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Judge declares Sherlock Holmes officially in the public domain

The Seventh Circuit Court ruled that Sherlock Homes is now in the public domain, freeing up the 127-year-old-character to be used without the permission of Conan Doyle’s estate. Leslie Klinger, author, editor, and Sherlock Holmes enthusiast, filed the case against the Doyle estate while preparing the short story anthology In the Company of Sherlock Holmes, which collects tales by contemporary writers that riff on stories from the Holmes canon. Judge Richard Posner agreed that the copyright expiration meant that Klinger doesn’t need the permission of the Doyle estate to publish the book. This also means that everyone making Sherlock Holmes film and TV adaptations—BBC (Sherlock with Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman), Warner Bros. (Sherlock Holmes with Robert Downey, Jr. and Jude Law), and CBS (Elementary with Johnny Lee Miller and Lucy Liu)—will no longer have to get the permission of or pay royalties to the estate. No word yet on whether the estate wants to take the case to the Supreme Court. [The Hollywood Reporter] READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Reviews are in for Hillary Clinton's new memoir

Clinton.jpg

Reviews are pouring in for Hillary Clinton’s new memoir Hard Choices, and they’re all over the map. Robin Abcarian at the Los Angeles Times writes that the book “leaves no room for doubt about how she might conduct foreign policy (pragmatically), how she will defend herself against charges that she mishandled the attack on the American compound in Benghazi, Libya (robustly) and about how much she regrets giving President George W. Bush carte blanche to wage war against Iraq (deeply and eternally).” Michiko Kakutani over at the New York Times calls it “a subtle, finely calibrated work that provides a portrait of the former secretary of state and former first lady as a heavy-duty policy wonk” and compares it favorably to Clinton’s 2003 book, Living History. On the other hand, Isaac Chotiner at The New Republic refutes Kakutani, saying her review is filled with generalizations. He writes, “if Kakutani is going to make claims for the book’s merits, she must follow through on her generic praise, and offer some sense of what is valuable in the book, or at least some sense of what she enjoyed about it.” And at Slate, critic John Dickerson says it’s filled with “safe, methodical writing.” In keeping with tradition, Clinton doesn’t reveal whether she’s running for president in 2016. Okay, Hillary; whatever you say. READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Do you want to die in the next 'Game of Thrones' novel?

If you know anything about Game of Thrones, you know that author George R.R. Martin kills off a lot of characters. If you’d like to join that esteemed company, here’s your chance. Martin is offering the opportunity to “meet a grisly death” in the next Song of Ice and Fire novel if you donate $20,000 to a fundraiser for the Wild Wolf Spirit sanctuary in New Mexico and The Food Depot of Santa Fe. You’ll be able to choose your position in the world (knight, peasant, whore, lady, etc) as well. But hurry! Offer only good while supplies last. Only one male and one female character are available. Other awards including sharing a breakfast with Martin, tickets to the show’s season 5 premiere, and even Martin’s hat. [Prizeo]

Simon & Schuster and HarperCollins will soon be joining the fray in the Amazon-Hachette war. According to Bloomberg News, their contracts are up for renewal next. This means that Amazon will be up against bigger arms — the publishers’ respective owners are News Corp. and CBS Corp. It also means that Veronica Roth and Stephen King will join J.K. Rowling and James Patterson in the controversy. Independent bookstore owners have also started yelling battle cries – the American Booksellers Association made digital banners reading, “Thanks, Amazon, the indies will take it from here,” “Independent bookstores sell books from all publishers. Always,” and “Pre-order and buy Hachette titles today.” Among all this, Hachette is laying off 3 percent of its staff. [Bloomberg]

Debut novelist Eimar McBride won the Bailey’s Women’s Prize for Fiction, one of the most highly regarded prizes in English-language literature. You might have heard of it when it was called the Orange Prize, sponsored by the British telecom company Orange, but it switched names and sponsorship this year. The book, A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing, beat out Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Americanah for the award, as well as four other novels on the shortlist. “I hope it will serve as an incentive to publishers everywhere to take a look at difficult books and think again,” McBride said at the ceremony. “We are all writers but we are all readers first. There is a contract between publishers and readers which must be honoured, readers can not be underestimated.” [The Guardian]

In honor of the upcoming World Cup, the curator of Brazilian literature festival FlipSide, Ángel Gurría-Quintana, gives a rundown of the country’s literature — and there’s plenty of it. “Despite the common complaint that not enough Brazilian literature is published in English,” Gurría-Quintana writes. “This is an auspicious moment for new Brazilian writing in translation.” [The Guardian]

On the Books: Mario Lopez memoir arriving this fall

Saved by the Bell‘s Mario Lopez’s upcoming memoir Just Between Us will be released on September 30. In the book, the Extra host opens up about his successes in the entertainment industry and “the heartbreaking mistakes” that still haunt him, including his highly public, and at times tumultuous, love life. In a release from his publisher Celebra, Lopez added, “There are no do-overs in life, so I had to learn to pick myself up and move forward, never forgetting the hard-won lessons. I’m thrilled to share my story in this memoir, to reveal the memories I’ve held close to my heart for the time.” This will be Lopez’s fourth book. [The Hollywood Reporter] READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Winnie the Pooh is Britain's best-loved children's book

Winnie the Pooh tops a recent poll of Britain’s best-loved children’s books from the past 150 years. Oddly enough, neither JK Rowling’s nor Philip Pullman’s books made the list — maybe different Harry Potter books split the vote? Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, which just barely made the date cutoff, landed at number two, followed by The Very Hungry CaterpillarThe Hobbit, and The Gruffalo. [The Telegraph]
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On the Books: Erotica authors have more interesting sex than most people

According to a new survey, erotica authors have way, way more interesting sex than you. A new poll of 103 erotica authors – 94 percent of whom were female and 89 percent straight – revealed that more than three-quarters had sex based on a scene in their own books and twice as many have practiced BSDM compared to the general population. Be sure to check out the individual answers, where one author confessed to having accomplished the difficult feat of doing the deed “on the Haunted Mansion ride at Disney World.” In addition to all the sexy hijinks they get up to, they don’t like 50 Shades of Grey that much. On average, they gave it 2.2 stars out of 5. [Melville House] READ FULL STORY

On The Books: BookExpo to feature Neil Patrick Harris, Lena Dunham, Amy Poehler

The annual publishing convention BookExpo America began Wednesday at New York City’s Javits Convention Center. The four-day-long event will feature appearances from Neil Patrick Harris, Lena Dunham, and Amy Poehler, all of whom are promoting their forthcoming memoirs: Neil Patrick Harris: Choose Your Own Autobiography (Oct. 14), Dunham’s Not That Kind of Girl (Oct. 7), and Poehler’s Yes Please (Oct. 28); other events include previews and discussions of film adaptations. EW’s YA expert Sara Vilokmerson is moderating The Fault in Our Stars event with author John Green and director Josh Boone, and EW’s Anthony Breznican  is moderating the This Is Where I Leave You panel with author Jonathan Tropper and actors Tina Fey and Jason Bateman. In addition to these star-studded events, the first-ever BookCon, modeled on ComicCon, will take place on the final day of BookExpo – organizers expect as many as 10,000 readers to attend. We can expect that the ongoing battle between Amazon and Hachette books will be a topic of discussion during BookExpo. [USA Today] READ FULL STORY

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