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Tag: Fiction (51-60 of 290)

Women's Prize for Fiction longlist announced

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The Women’s Prize for Fiction — formerly the Orange Prize before the telephone corporation withdrew its funding — has announced its 20 contenders out of 140 submissions. The wide-ranging longlist of female authors includes literary heavyweights like Zadie Smith and Barbara Kingsolver as well as newcomers Shani Boianjiu and Francesca Segal. It includes Bring Up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel, which EW named the best novel of 2012, as well as Sheila Heti’s How Should a Person Be?, which EW named one of the worst. See the full list below: READ FULL STORY

'Girls' guest star Bob Balaban really has written a best-selling series of books about a bionic dog. No, really...

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One of the best jokes on last night’s Girls involved Hannah’s therapist, played by guest star Bob Balaban, mentioning he had written a bestselling series of children’s books about a bionic dog.

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Dan Brown's 'Inferno' cover revealed -- PHOTO

This morning, Today revealed the art for Brown’s next mystery, entitled Inferno, which will see the return of serial protagonist, symbologist, and long-haired dude Robert Langdon, last seen in The Lost Symbol.

The cover art features an image of the Italian writer Dante, which is no coincidence: The book was inspired by his 14th-century poem and will take place in Italy. (Can we guess Florence? Because you can totally see Florence peeking through the cover.)

“With this new novel, I am excited to take readers on a journey deep into this mysterious realm … a landscape of codes, symbols, and more than a few secret passageways,” Brown said in a statement — and a world of symbol- and secret passageway-loving fans rejoiced.

Take a look at the cover after the jump. What do you think?

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Stephen King unearths origin of 'The Shining' sequel 'Doctor Sleep' -- EXCLUSIVE

A man never outlives his father.

That’s a line from William Faulkner, but it applies in earnest to Danny Torrance, the psychic little boy from Stephen King’s The Shining.

King is revisiting the now middle-aged Dan Torrance in the sequel Doctor Sleep (out Sept. 24) which finds him working at a hospice, where he uses his innate supernatural powers to ease the suffering of the dying. Dan may have survived his old man’s madness (and swinging mallet) in the hallways of that long-ago snowbound hotel, but he has grown up to realize that not all demons can be escaped. Some are a part of you.

In a wide-ranging interview with Entertainment Weekly, King reveals the origin story behind Doctor Sleep, talks about the fatherhood fears buried in The Shining, and speculates about what could become of his stories when he’s long, long gone …

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2013 Caldecott and Newbery Medal winners are announced

Awards season isn’t limited to those in film and television.

The American Library Association announced its own set of winners today for the best in children’s books.

The 2013 Caldecott Medal, which recognizes picture books, was awarded to Jon Klassen for This Is Not My Hat, a follow-up to his popular story, I Want My Hat Back. This Is Not My Hat is the tale of a small fish with a zealous attitude and what happens when he steals a hat from a larger creature.

The 2013 Newbery Medal for children’s literature was awarded to Katherine Applegate for The One and Only Ivan, which tells the story of an artistic gorilla that lives a caged life in a shopping center and hardly ever misses the jungle. But Ivan’s world is changed when he’s joined by a baby elephant that helps him to see things differently.

Even adults can appreciate the humor and creativity in these award-winning children’s books.

Read more:
10 Great New Historical Books for Kids
Great Books for Kids 4-6
Gary Ross: 10 Kids’ Books I Love

'Battling Boy': Paul Pope's epic creative quest to create a new generation superhero -- Exclusive Excerpt!

“What is the Superman we need for today?” The question haunts Paul Pope, and the comic book artist’s long-awaited opus Battling Boy, which publisher First Second Books will release on October 8. The graphic novel — the first of two volumes which combined will exceed 400 pages — represents the first major work from this leading light of independent comics since his mainstream breakthrough in 2006, the Eisner winning Batman: Year 100, a future-punk take on the dark knight rendered in his distinctive Kirby-strong storytelling that mixes kinetic Manga energy with expressive lines often associated with European comics. Battling Boy will arrive about three years behind schedule, and following a creative journey as epic as the saga itself, involving such larger-than-life characters as Oscar-winning producer Scott Rudin, acclaimed novelist Michael Chabon, and superstar Brad Pitt. Says Pope: “It’s been a strange couple years.”

More about Pope’s adventure through the Hollywood looking-glass in a bit. First: The book. Battling Boy is set on an alternate Earth – there are countless within this Lovecraftian multiverse — that’s having of a crisis moment: Monsters from another realm are terrorizing the dystopian sprawl of Arcopolis. When the ghouls assassinate the city’s high flying protector, a stern and gadgety Batman-meets-Iron Man type named Haggard West (he has a jet pack; drives a “Westmobile”), the suffering masses receive a new hero from the interdimensional mystical mothership from which all heroes come from: A haughty yet naïve superboy, the scrapping son of a war god. (You’ll meet both father and son in our exclusive excerpt from the book, which begins on page three.)  READ FULL STORY

'Elimination Night': 'American Idol' parody's 6 craziest moments

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Elimination Night is a fictionalized account of one young producer’s experiences working at Project Icon — a behemoth singing competition that bears more than a passing resemblance to American Idol. (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt will only say that the book’s scribe has “intimate firsthand knowledge of the behind-the-scenes workings of a top TV talent show.”)

In the book, one judge issues a 78-page rider that demands a 4,000 square foot “dressing compound,” a $1 billion body insurance policy (“breasts/buttocks to be valued at one hundred million dollars each”), and that the show’s crew never make eye contact with her. Another has to undergo a “sanity check” — which he barely passes — before signing on to join Icon‘s panel. The innocent, apple-cheeked, country-singing winner of the fictional reality show is actually a promiscuous, closeted Don Juan who enjoyed encounters with “hotel workers, judges’ assistants, his fellow contestants, [and] even a couple of passing construction workers” during filming.

And those aren’t even the juiciest moments from the story! Check out the book’s craziest plot points below.

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Dan Brown's new novel 'Inferno' coming this spring

Antiquity meets modern-day mystery once again in Dan Brown’s upcoming novel Inferno. Doubleday announced this morning that the Da Vinci Code and Lost Symbol author’s next novel, coming May 14, will feature Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon’s return. The action will take place in Italy, and at the heart of the mystery will stand the literary classic Dante’s Inferno.

“Although I studied Dante’s Inferno as a student, it wasn’t until recently, while researching in Florence, that I came to appreciate the enduring influence of Dante’s work on the modern world,” said Brown in a press release. “With this new novel, I am excited to take readers on a journey deep into this mysterious realm… a landscape of codes, symbols, and more than a few secret passageways.”

Inferno will get a first printing of four million copies in the U.S. and Canada.

Follow @EWStephanLee on Twitter.

Read more:
J.K. Rowling’s ‘The Casual Vacancy’ sees respectable sales figures during first week
Read the Book! 26 Disappointing Movie Adaptations

'Swamplandia!' author Karen Russell interviews 'Age of Miracles' author Karen Thompson Walker -- EXCLUSIVE

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In addition to having the same first name, Karen Thompson Walker and Karen Russell are both authors of inventive novels that became significant commercial and critical successes. Karen Thompson Walker wrote the apocalyptic summer hit The Age of Miracles, which was included in several “Best of” lists for 2012, and Russell’s 2011 novel Swamplandia! was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. The two literary Karens got together for a chat about The Age of Miracles. Their interview will appear in the paperback edition of Miracles, out Jan. 15, but you can get an exclusive sneak peak at it below!

Russell’s latest collection of short stories, Vampires in the Lemon Grove, will be released Feb. 12.

Follow @EWStephanLee on Twitter.

Read more:
See the new paperback cover of ‘The Age of Miracles’ by Karen Thompson Walker — EXCLUSIVE
Amazon picks its top 10 books of 2012 so far
Book ‘em: Summer 2012′s Hot Reads

If you find Dennis Lehane's lost dog, he'll name a character after you in his new book

The bad news: Novelist/screenwriter Dennis Lehane’s beloved dog has gone missing.

The good news: If you find her, the author of Mystic River and Shutter Island will name a character after you in his next book. There’s no guarantee that character will be sane and/or safe from a grisly death, though.

Lehane posted his unusual offer on Facebook Tuesday, explaining that the pooch — a black-and-tan beagle who answers to the name ‘Tessa’ — had jumped the fence at his Brookline, Mass. home 24 hours previously. “She’s smart, fast, and immeasurably sweet,” the Edgar Award winner wrote. “She doesn’t have a mean bone in her body. She’s micro-chipped, but her tags were off when she was let out into the yard.

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