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Tag: Fiction (21-30 of 290)

'The X-Files' star Gillian Anderson to pen sci-fi book series for new Simon & Schuster imprint -- EXCLUSIVE

Gillian Anderson is returning to the genre that made her a cultural icon – but it’s not on television. The newest project from the star of The X-Files is a book franchise called the EarthEnd Saga, a collaboration with co-writer Jeff Rovin, a prolific geek whose extensive bibliography includes works in the best-selling Tom Clancy’s Op-Center series. The first novel, entitled A Vision of Fire, will be published in October by Simon & Schuster through a new imprint devoted to literary and speculative fiction across all genres called Simon451, a nod to legendary author Ray Bradbury’s dystopian/sci-fi classic Fahrenheit 451.

“It’s been a fantastic experience,” Anderson tells EW, adding that she was inspired to give sci-fi world-building and storytelling a shot at the encouragement of Rovin, a friend of a friend. “I enjoy writing, but don’t usually allow myself the time, and I don’t think I’d ever think to write something in this genre without the prodding of someone like Jeff. But I realized I had ideas hidden within me for a series and a lead character, in this case, a heroine.” Referring to The X-Files, she says: “After nine years of living in a semi-science-fictional universe, I think I now have an ingrained knowledge and rhythm for it.”
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'It's Kind of a Funny Story' author Ned Vizzini dies at 32

Ned Vizzini, the author of YA favorites It’s Kind of a Funny Story and Be More Chill, died Thursday in New York City. According to the Los Angeles Times, Vizzini committed suicide. He was 32.

Vizzini, a Brooklyn native, began writing professionally for New York City newspapers as a teenager in the late ’90s. His first book, a “quasi-autogiobraphy” called Teen Angst? Naaah…, collected several of Vizzini’s columns for the New York Press and shared its title with an essay Vizzini had published in the New York Times Magazine when he was still a junior at Manhattan’s prestigious Stuyvesant High School. The book hit shelves in 2000. His first novel, Be More Chill, was published in 2004.

That same year, Vizzini experienced depression and suicidal thoughts, which prompted him to call a suicide hotline. Vizzini subsequently spent a week in the psychiatric ward of Brooklyn’s Methodist Hospital. Vizzini would later fictionalize this experience in his acclaimed second novel, It’s Kind of a Funny Story, published in 2006. The novel was adapted into a film starring Keir Gilchrist, Zach Galifianakis, and Emma Roberts in 2010.
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The Best YA Novel of All Time? EW Staff Pick: 'A Wrinkle in Time' by Madeleine L'Engle

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As our “Best YA Novel of All Time” bracket continues, we’re unveiling our picks, which didn’t advance as far as we would like. Here’s the case for Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time.

First of all, I’ve got to level with you — I never really thought of A Wrinkle in Time as being a YA book. That’s mainly because I read Madeleine L’Engle’s masterpiece for the first time when I was in fourth grade, a few years before becoming a young adult myself.

More specifically: It was recess. I was on the playground. All around me, fellow elementary schoolers were shrieking and running and learning the basics of social interaction, but I didn’t care — because it was a dark and stormy night at the Murry family’s 200-year-old Connecticut farmhouse, which was pretty much the coolest thing I could possibly imagine.

Given that last sentence, you can probably gather why I was immediately captivated by Wrinkle‘s charming misfit of a heroine: awkward, irritable, smart-but-underachieving Meg Murry. Like me, Meg wore glasses; like me, she felt like she never quite fit anywhere, neither among the dreadfully normal kids at school nor among her uncommonly gifted family. (As her child genius younger brother Charles Wallace puts it, Meg is “not one thing or the other, not flesh or fowl nor good red herring.” I had absolutely no idea what that meant, but I loved the way it sounded anyway.)

What I didn’t understand back then is that at some point, everyone feels like an outsider. Ironically enough, alienation is one of the most universal emotions there is — especially for adolescent girls.  READ FULL STORY

Read an excerpt from the TV-inspired 'Grimm: The Icy Touch' -- EXCLUSIVE

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Things are looking a bit Grimm for Nick Burkhardt — though not on your TV screen. Instead, author John Shirley has written an original novel based on NBC’s hit fairy tale series series. In Grimm: The Icy Touch, Nick and Hank are left to investigate The Icy Touch, a criminal organization that’s threatening Wesen into joining their operation. The investigation quickly sparks a deadly rivalry.

We’ve got an exclusive excerpt from The Icy Touch, including two chapters in which Nick, Hank, Monroe, and Wesen find themselves in a fight or two. Check them out below:

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Phyllis Reynolds Naylor talks finishing the 'Alice' series -- a 28-book, 28-year-long opus

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If you’re a woman of a certain age, you’re probably familiar with Alice McKinley — the strawberry-blond everygirl first introduced in 1985′s The Agony of Alice.

Though Newbery Medal-winning author Phyllis Reynolds Naylor originally envisioned the novel as a standalone story, she followed it with a sequel, Alice in Rapture, Sort of, in 1989. Fans still wanted more — so in 1991, Naylor began releasing one Alice book every year, following her creation from middle school to the summer after her high school graduation. In the early aughts, she also released a series of prequels about Alice’s life in elementary school — the perfect solution for girls not yet ready to read their older sisters’ favorite books. Over nearly three decades, the books have won legions of fans for their colorful depiction of a regular girl’s trials and tribulations, as well as their frank discussions of topics like sex — passages that frequently landed Alice among the ALA’s list of most frequently challenged books.

28 years later, Naylor is finally wrapping the series with an ambitious, 523-page volume that follows Alice from ages 18 to 60. The book, which hits shelves today, is called Now I’ll Tell You Everything – a title that’s both evocative and refreshingly straightforward, much like the Alice series as a whole.

Naylor is happy with the way her magnum opus turned out, though naturally, saying goodbye is bittersweet. “I suppose it’s like having a child go off to college,” she told EW in an interview last month. “For the last 28 years, six months of every year was dedicated to an Alice book. And suddenly, I have six whole months more to do whatever I want! So that’s exciting, but there’s still times I wish she were home.”

Read on to learn more about the series’ long-awaited conclusion. Spoiler alert: We discuss the contents of Now I’ll Tell You Everything, so read on only if you’ve already read the book… or if you’ve always wanted to know how everything turns out for Alice.

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B.J. Novak previews his new book, 'One More Thing' -- EXCLUSIVE

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Woody Allen. George Saunders. B.J. Novak?

That’s the vibe the ex-Office multihyphenate is going for in his first short story collection, One More Thing: Stories and Other Stories — the cover of which you’ll see for the first time above. “It’s a really great form — fiction with a sense of humor,” Novak tells EW. “It’s what I love to read, and it’s what I wanted to write.”

The book contains 60 stories, some short… and some shorter. “I didn’t want to write in the traditional  mold where you’d be constrained by anything,” Novak explains, noting that a few of his pieces are mere lines long –à la his pal Simon Rich, another writer Novak admires. “They’re all based around some idea played out to its limit, and no further,” he continues. “I think a lot of fiction tries to stretch — I was happy to go in new directions, but not if the story didn’t call for it.”

Novak has been testing some of those new directions in a series of live literary readings, an integral facet of his editing process. As he puts it, “A live audience really keeps you humble, and makes you desperate to entertain and keep their attention. I really wanted to be honest with myself; I didn’t want to be pretentious. I wanted to make sure these stories were captivating people.”

He’ll be testing those waters once again at New York Comic Con Friday. There, Novak will read some of his new material and sit for a conversation with Time Magazine’s Lev Grossman before signing a sampler of stories produced exclusively for the event. (The panel is at 1:30 p.m.; the signing begins at 3 p.m.) The sampler will include tales like “The Impatient Billionaire and the Mirror for Earth,” a piece about a wealthy but unfulfilled man that neatly summarizes the collection’s main motif: “Many or most of the stories are about someone who is doing fine, but becomes obsessed with the one thing that will make them complete,” Novak says. “And that was sort of an inadvertent theme I stumbled on as I wrote the book.”

One More Thing hits shelves Feb. 4.

HarperCollins announces Oz-inspired series 'Dorothy Must Die' -- EXCLUSIVE

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More than a century after L. Frank Baum’s novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, the Emerald City continues to shine brightly in pop culture. Debut novelist Danielle Paige signed a three-book and three-digital novella deal with HarperCollins. The series will start with Dorothy Must Die, described as “The Wizard of Oz meets Kill Bill“, in April 2014. In this re-imagining, a twister rips through Kansas and transports Amy Gumm — most likely inspired by Judy Garland’s birth name Frances Gumm — into Oz, which has been transformed under Dorothy’s tyrannical misrule. In a complete twist from the original, Amy must steal the Scarecrow’s brain, remove the Tin Woodman’s heart, and take the Lion’s courage. And ultimately — destroy Dorothy. READ FULL STORY

See the trailer for 'Endless Knight' by Kresley Cole -- EXCLUSIVE

Kresley Cole, well known for her Immortals after Dark books, has been writing steamy series for adults for a number of years, but she found a whole new audience last year with the best-selling Poison Princess, which kick-started her first series for young adults. Endless Knight, the second book in the Arcana series, is just around the corner on Oct. 1, and we have the dramatic trailer for it exclusively on Shelf Life. The sequel will follow Evie, who has fully come into her powers as the tarot Empress, as she meets the titular character, also known as Death. See the trailer below!: READ FULL STORY

'Captain Underpants' leads list of 'most challenged' books

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It’s been 16 years (!) since Dav Pilkey’s inaugural novel about a certain tighty-whitey-clad crusader first hit shelves — but some parents are still wishing that the superhero would go up, up, and away.

Pilkey’s Captain Underpants series tops the American Library Association’s list of the past year’s “most frequently challenged books,” an annual account collected by the Office for Intellectual Freedom.

Though the ALA is currently celebrating Banned Books Week, the items on this list haven’t necessarily been barred from libraries; instead, they’ve been the targets of “formal, written complaint[s], filed with a library or school requesting that materials be removed because of content or appropriateness.” The ALA notes that the number of challenges reflect only reported incidents — though it estimates that “for every reported challenge, four or five remain unreported.”

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National Book Awards unveils fiction longlist

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The National Book Foundation released today its longlist in Fiction for this year’s National Book Award. Among the authors are former National Book Award winners and finalists, a Pulitzer Prize winner and a debut novelist.

Below is the complete list: READ FULL STORY

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