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Tag: Comic Books (21-30 of 138)

Comic-Con first look: New 'Sandman' cover by Dave McKean

Neil Gaiman’s Sandman gets an intense spotlight this week at Comic-Con International with a silver anniversary celebration and new details about Sandman: Overture No. 1, the October release that marks Gaiman’s first Morpheus story since 1996.

We’ve got two First Look images from that first issue below — the Dave McKean cover and the page one interior art by J.H. Williams III — but first a bit of background.

A whisper can be louder than a shout in the right setting at that was the case back in 1988 when Sandman No. 1 hit shelves and spinner racks with a Dave McKean cover that showed mixed-media ambitions, cryptic images, and a muted approach to color and text — all very strange in an era when the average DC Comics cover was about as subtle as an air-raid siren.

The story inside was worthy of the special treatment. In it writer Neil Gaiman introduced a pale, otherworldly figure: Morpheus, an imprisoned dream lord who yearns to break free and return to his kingdom.

Escape he did and that issue began the landmark 75-issue run that left fans dizzy with it’s breadth and imagination.  Now Gaiman is the one returning to his kingdom of imagination and McKean has another compelling cover to herald it. (Mouse over the image to get a magnified look.)

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Amazon launches new comic imprint with titles from George R.R. Martin, Hugh Howey, and more -- EXCLUSIVE

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Get ready to see one of George R.R. Martin’s “strangest, darkest, and most twisted” short stories in comic book form.

Amazon Publishing has announced the launch of Jet City Comics, a new imprint devoted to comics and graphic novels, and they already have an impressive lineup of titles on deck. First up is Symposium #1, adapted from the fantasy book series The Foreworld Saga, and October will bring original adaptations of George R.R. Martin’s short story “Meathouse Man” and Hugh Howey’s sci-fi self-publishing phenomenon Wool. Jet City issues will be available as Kindle downloads and print editions.

“My fans have been clamoring for the return of Dunk & Egg ever since the graphic novels of ‘The Hedge Knight’ and ‘The Sworn Sword’ went out of print several years ago,” said author George R.R. Martin in a press release, “so I am delighted to announce that Jet City Comics is bringing them back — newly formatted for digital readers, and in paper for those who still prefer the traditional formats. And Jet City will be bringing you something new as well: the graphic novel ‘Meathouse Man,’ adapted from one of my strangest, darkest, and most twisted short stories by the amazingly talented Raya Golden. I’m pleased and excited to be a part of Jet City’s takeoff. May they fly high.”

Here are full details about forthcoming Jet City comics: READ FULL STORY

Neil Gaiman on the spooky art of writing -- EXCLUSIVE

The same day Neil Gaiman’s The Ocean At the End of the Lane hit No. 1 on the New York Times bestseller list the author’s book tour made a stop at the Alex Theatre in Glendale, Ca., where he was joined onstage by Entertainment Weekly’s Geoff Boucher for a lively 80-minute conversation about the spooky art of writing.

Gaiman did a reading from the slender new release and (in a surprise) also from Fortunately, the Milk, an endearingly daft children’s book due in September.

The event, put on by Live Talks LA, is presented in its entirety below and reveals the unexpected path of The Ocean at the End of the Lane and the reason its protagonist resembles the author far more than the central characters in his best-known works, which include Coraline, The Graveyard Book, Stardust, Neverwhere, American Gods and The Sandman series for Vertigo and DC Comics.
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'80s TV shows getting comic book treatment

Punky Brewster and the kids from Saved by the Bell are returning to the small screen through digital comic books. So, too, are Knight Rider, Airwolf, and Miami Vice.

Lion Forge Comics and NBC Universal said Tuesday they partnered to develop, write, illustrate, and publish digital comics based on those shows from the 1980s and 1990s, bringing new stories for characters like Crockett and Tubbs as well as KITT and Screech.

The comics are set to be released later this year through iTunes, Amazon’s Kindle Bookstore, Barnes & Noble’s Nook store and Kobo.
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New 'Back to Back to the Future' comic book imagines world in which Eric Stoltz is not replaced by Michael J. Fox -- EXCLUSIVE FREE DOWNLOAD

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Back to the Future buffs like to imagine how the trilogy would have been different had Eric Stoltz not been fired as Marty McFly and replaced by Michael J. Fox (which also led to The Office’s Melora Hardin being let go as Jennifer Parker because she was deemed too tall to play opposite Fox). Well, one fan has gone a step further, creating a six issue digital comic about just such a scenario. In David Guy Levy’s Back to Back to the Future, BTTF co-writer Bob Gale and Hardin accidentally travel back in time, but once they are there decide to change history and make sure Stoltz is never replaced in the 1985 film. READ FULL STORY

'Star Trek': Life after Khan begins with IDW's 'After Darkness'

Image credit: IDW Publishing

The “new” mythology of Starfleet began with the brand-reviving J.J. Abrams film Star Trek in 2009 and extended with Star Trek Into Darkness  this summer, but the canon is not limited to those silver screen cornerstones — the events chronicled in the Paramount videogame  also “count as canon” (as Trek producer and writer Roberto Orci has pointed out on many occasions) as do the events in the Star Trek comic books from IDW Publishing, the fourth largest comic book publisher in America (since 2011) and a brand that just posted the best market-share month in its 14-year history.

Issue No. 22 of the IDW Trek series arrives this week at stores and, as the After Darkness title suggests, it takes the story beyond the events depicted in Star Trek Into Darkness and, in doing so, becomes the first official Trek tale in any medium to take the story baton past the most recent film’s Khan story.

And (with Orci’s guidance as the creative consultant on the comics series) it may hint about the priorities for the next cinematic mission. To learn more about the spirit of the IDW series, we mind-melded with writer Mike Johnson (who is teamed with artist Erfan Fajar on story pages and the gifted Tim Bradstreet on select covers) to find out if he’s in Federation space or out of his Vulcan mind.
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'Pacific Rim: Tales of Year Zero' graphic novel has an anchor in kaiju waters

Unleashing the Kraken would surely satisfy any appetite for cinematic destruction, right? Think again because Clash of the Titans screenwriter Travis Beacham went looking for bigger fish to fry (or, uh,  more substantial sea monsters to sauté?) and the result is the Guillermo del Toro-helmed Pacific Rim, one of the most-anticipated genre films of 2013 and one of the very few that is not a sequel or a prequel, a remake or an adaptation, or (as in the case of Star Trek Into Darkness) some meta-hybrid of the above. Beacham has taken the story one step further and turned the origins of Pacific Rim into a companion comic, Pacific Rim: Tales from Year Zero.

The story is set in a near-future where coastal cities are ravaged by giant beasties who enter our world through a mysterious inter-dimensional portal down in briny depths. Out this week, Pacific Rim: Tales from Year Zero (112-page hardcover, $24.99 from Legendary) was written by Beacham and illustrated by Sean Chen, Yvel Guichet, Pericles Junior, Chris Batista, and Geoff Shaw. The Warner Bros and Legendary Pictures movie stars Charlie Hunnam, Idris Elba, Rinko Kikuchi, Charlie Day, and Ron Perlman and opens July 12 in 3-D and IMAX 3-D.

EW spoke with Beacham about the challenges of fitting the huge scale of the movie into a companion comic.
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Furor over Orson Scott Card's anti-gay views drives 'Superman' illustrator to leave comic

Celebrated science fiction author Orson Scott Card also happens to be a fervent, outspoken opponent of same-sex marriage — and now the controversy sparked by his unpopular views has affected Card’s upcoming Adventures of Superman project.

Card has been opposed to gay marriage for decades; in 2009, he joined the board of directors of the National Organization for Marriage, a conservative group dedicated to “protect[ing] marriage and the faith communities that sustain it.” When DC announced last month that Card would co-write an issue of Adventures of Superman, the news immediately stoked fan ire. A petition urging DC to sever ties with Card has garnered over 16,000 signatures on the LGBT activist site All Out; other supporters of gay rights have called for a boycott of the comic itself.

Yesterday, the brouhaha prompted artist Chris Sprouse to leave the Superman project altogetherREAD FULL STORY

A revealing new book collects 'Comics About Cartoonists': Dark, happy, surreal, suicidal

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Sean Howe’s recent history of Marvel Comics: The Untold Story was only the latest chronicle of one theme that runs through every honest assessment of the lives of comic book artists: That they have been since the dawn of the industry underpaid, overworked, and exploited. Add to this the art-world prejudice that these men (and they were mostly men, at least in the 1950s/60s world of superhero, horror, and romance comics) are lesser talents than fine artists, and you can see why the gorgeous, poignant new book Comics About Cartoonists: Stories About the World’s Oddest Profession, edited and designed by Craig Yoe (IDW/Yoe Books) exerts a potent fascination. READ FULL STORY

'Green Lantern' #16: Exclusive preview!

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Green Lantern #16 continues the ongoing “Rise of the Third Army” story arc, and focuses on the introduction of new hero Simon Baz into the ranks of the Green Lanterns. EW is excited to share an exclusive preview of the issue with readers, which includes the first four pages and a few variant covers. Suffice it to say: B’dg the space squirrel features prominently. (The issue hits streets on January 23.)

Check out the preview by clicking forward!

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