Shelf Life Book news, reviews, trends, and talk

Tag: Children's Books (1-10 of 98)

On the Books: Mary-Louise Parker to pen memoir in the form of letters

Actress Mary-Louise Parker will tell her life story through a series of letters penned to the most important men in her life—so exes Billy Crudup and Jeffrey Dean Morgan should maybe look out. Dear Mr. You will be released by Simon & Schuster imprint Scribner in fall 2015. “I am so honored and thrilled to be working with Scribner and in the company of such wonderful writers,” said Mary-Louise Parker in a Scribner press release.

“From Frank McCourt to Jeannette Walls to Anjelica Huston, Scribner loves a great memoirist, and Mary-Louise Parker is one,” added senior vice president and publisher Nan Graham. “Her writing is magnificent; the conceit—a memoir in letters to men—is wholly original and brilliantly executed.” The Emmy-, Tony-, and Golden Globe-winning actress is best known for her critically acclaimed role as pot-dealing widow Nancy Botwin on Showtime’s Weeds. 

READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Long-lost Dr. Seuss stories hit shelves

Horton-and-the-Kwuggerbug

A new Dr. Seuss book was published Tuesday, 23 years after the writer’s death. Horton and the Kwuggerbug and More Lost Stories is a collection of four previously unpublished short stories that Seuss wrote for Redbook magazine in the 1950s. The stories, discovered by Seuss biographer Charles Cohen and published by Random House, feature both familiar faces like The Grinch and Horton the elephant, as well as new characters like the titular Kwuggerbug. Theodor Geisel, the man behind the legendary pseudonym, died in 1991. [The Telegraph]

British fantasy novelist Graham Joyce died Tuesday at the age of 59 after a yearlong battle with lymphoma. Joyce’s publisher Gollancz, confirmed the news via Twitter: “Graham Joyce was a writer of huge heart. He loved people and his writing celebrated the magic of them. His books are a fitting legacy.” The multiple-time British Fantasy award winner was mourned on Twitter by fans and fellow authors including Stephen King, who tweeted, “Very sad to hear that Graham Joyce, a truly great novelist, has passed away. Too soon. Far too soon.” [The Guardian]

The nation’s largest bookstore, Barnes & Noble, experienced a 7-percent loss in revenue in its first quarter, ending in August—but managed to cut its net losses from $87 million to $28.4 million in the first period of the fiscal year. Retail CEO Mitch Klipper said that part of the reduction in declining sales is due to the ongoing dispute between retailer Amazon and publisher Hachette, as well as the popularity of movies adapted from young-adult books. B&N’s future revenues will in part be determined by its Nook Media ebook business and a new joint venture with Google, a book delivery system, currently being piloted. [Publishers Weekly]

Celebrity television judge-turned-author Judge Judy Sheindlin is giving away her new book for free. What Would Judy Say?: Be the Hero of Your Own Story is downloadable on Sheindlin’s website a PDF or e-book, free of charge.  On the site, Scheindlen—who collects a bigger paycheck than any other celebrity on TV, earning nearly a million dollars per workday—describes her book as “an honest conversation with women about what it really takes to get what you deserve out of life.” [Los Angeles Times]

 

 

 

 

On the Books: Americans appear on Man Booker shortlist for first time

Man-Booker-Prize.jpg

The shortlist of contenders for the United Kingdom’s prestigious Man Booker Prize, announced today, includes American authors Joshua Ferris and Karen Joy Fowler among the unprecedentedly multinational selection. The competition—which until this year was only open to citizens of the the U.K., U.K. Commonwealth, Ireland, and Zimbabwe—considered writers from any country, as long as they were published in English in the United Kingdom. Here is the list in full:

Joshua Ferris (U.S.), To Rise Again at a Decent Hour (Viking)
Richard Flanagan (Australian), The Narrow Road to the Deep North (Chatto & Windus)
Karen Joy Fowler (U.S.), We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves (Serpent’s Tail)
Howard Jacobson (British), J (Jonathan Cape)
Neel Mukherjee (British), The Lives of Others (Chatto & Windus)
Ali Smith (British), How to be Both (Hamish Hamilton)

Despite fears of British authors being shut out by American literary powerhouses, Brits still dominated the competition, nabbing three of the six spots on the shortlist. AC Grayling, chair of the judges, said the selection is “a strong, thought-provoking shortlist which we believe demonstrates the wonderful depth and range of contemporary fiction in English.” The winner of the $80,000 award will be announced in London on Oct. 14. [NPR]

Rolling Stones legend Keith Richards’ children’s book, Gus & Me: The Story of My Granddad and My First Guitar, hits shelves today. Published by Little, Brown and illustrated by Richards’ daughter Theodora, the book is about Richards’ childhood memories of jazz-musician grandfather Gus, who shared his love for music and London with a young Keith. [USA Today]

Publishers Weekly conducted an informal poll of more than 20 independent bookstores, finding that despite earlier predictions, most of the stores enjoyed a successful summer. Though overall book sales fell nearly 8 percent in the first half of 2014, PW‘s poll shows that many small booksellers saw a surge in sales over the last quarter. Storeowners attribute part of the increase to the Hachette-Amazon feud—Powell’s Books of Portland, Ore., for example, received 10,000 pre-orders for Edan Lepucki’s California after getting a mention on The Colbert Report.

Judith Viorst talks 'Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day'

Judith-Viorst

It’s time for a trip down memory lane. If you grew up reading picture books, chances are you’re familiar with Judith Viorst’s Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. Originally published in 1972, Alexander is one of those instant classics because, like the titular character, we’ve all had our fair share of terrible, horrible, no good, very bad days. Alexander’s hitting the big screen next month with Disney’s adaptation starring Steve Carell and Jennifer Garner. Coincidentally, \ Viorst has two new books (out now) leading up to the movie’s release: Alexander, Who’s Trying His Best to Be the Best Boy Ever and And Two Boys Booed, illustrated by Sophie Blackall. Here, Viorst talks about her inspiration for both, and Alexander’s lasting legacy. READ FULL STORY

Nick Cannon to publish illustrated poetry book for kids

Versatile TV and radio personality Nick Cannon will soon be adding “published poet” to his list of professional accomplishments. Today Scholastic announced it will publish Neon Aliens Ate My Homework and Other Poems, a hip-hop-influenced children’s poetry book written and partially illustrated by Cannon, in March 2015.

The poetry collection will include “funny, silly, gross, heartwarming, as well as serious poems,” according to the Scholastic press release. Cannon—a musician, comedian, actor, producer and host of America’s Got Talent—will do some of the illustrations himself, while others will be the work of notable streets artists like Califawnia (a.k.a. Fawn Arthur), Art Mobb (a.k.a. Michael Farhat), and MAST.

Neon Aliens is inspired by Cannon’s love for both poetry and hip-hop. “Writing is at the center of everything I do as an artist,” Cannon said. “As a kid, it was my escape from the inner-city pitfalls.” He credits Shel Silverstein in particular with fostering his passion for writing poetry and creating art from a young age—and aspires to do the same for kids today with his book. “I hope that poems in Neon Aliens will help inspire kids to want to get out a pen and paper to write or draw their own thoughts, rhymes, and stories.”

The book deal is the result of a collaboration between Nick Cannon’s production and management company Ncredible Entertainment, Vice President at Scholastic Debra Dorfman, and the investment group Impact Republic. Scholastic is set to publish a previously announced children’s book by Cannon in November, Roc and Roe’s Twelve Days of Christmas.

Inside the far-off world of 'Star Wars Workbooks'

Many elementary school kids spend their days wishing school was more like Star Wars. But what if Star Wars was school?

That’s the ambitious theory behind Workman Publishing’s new collection of Star Wars Workbooks, which aim to drill youngsters in everything from “Preschool Number Fun” to “2nd Grade Writing—by means of everything from Boba Fett to Padmé Amidala. The books align with Common Core requirements, and Workman promises that they drill basic concepts in much the same way as the company’s highly successful Brainquest workbook series. Of course, the Star Wars books will also help everyone remember the long “O” in Obi-Wan (which we think is far more important than two plus two). READ FULL STORY

Father's Day: Brad Meltzer on dads who changed history

I never really cared about Father’s Day. Even when I became a father, I didn’t want to make a big deal — that is, until my own dad died.

Thankfully, I was lucky enough to tell my father how grateful I was for all he’d done throughout my life. But there’s nothing like the death of a parent to make you really examine their impact.

Over the past year, as I was researching a new series of children’s books that I was writing for my own kids, I took a look at the childhoods of American heroes like Amelia Earhart and Rosa Parks.

Do you know how Amelia Earhart got to ride on her first airplane? It was because of her father.

READ FULL STORY

Guess what's on the cover of B.J. Novak's 'Book With No Pictures'

B.J. Novak’s Instagram followers already know that the comedian is really into photographing text — generally, those are the only kinds of photos he posts. And now, he’s bringing that idea to the world of children’s books with his upcoming The Book With No Pictures.

READ FULL STORY

Rush Limbaugh wins Children's Book Award; American history loses

The 2014 Children’s Choice Book Award goes to none other than conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh, who penned the darkhorse (pun intended) hit Rush Revere and the Brave Pilgrims: Time-Travel Adventures With Exceptional Americans. The plot is that a history teacher named Rush Revere (nee Limbaugh) and his talking horse Liberty travel back in time to meet the pilgrims. Naturally, they get into semantics on American exceptionalism. It’s worth noting that Rush Revere is the same “character” from Limbaugh’s patriotic iced tea brand, Two If By Tea. READ FULL STORY

On The Books: Jon Cryer's Memoir from 'Pretty in Pink' to 'Two and A Half Men'

Jon Cryer is writing a memoir, and I hope he makes it a diary from the perspective of Duckie. I would snap that book up. Sounds like Cryer has the right attitude about it though: “In these times of truly global crisis when fear is outracing hope, I think we can all be grateful that the guy who played Duckie in Pretty in Pink is writing a book. It’ll be filled with just what you’d expect from me; juicy tidbits on international monetary policy, catty comments regarding agriculture in Central Asia and of course, forbidden anecdotes about stamp collecting. And maybe I’ll talk about Charlie Sheen.”

READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Books

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP