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Tag: Book (71-80 of 153)

'Gangster Squad' book still to be released Aug. 7

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EW reported just last week that Warner Bros, as an act of respect in the aftermath of the Aurora shooting tragedy, had moved quickly to push back the release date of its action-drama Gangster Squad from its original date of Sept. 7 back to Jan. 11, 2013.  The delay was implemented, above all else, to allow director Ruben Fleischer the time to edit out footage in which a group of men shoot up a movie theater from behind the screen (the now certainly insensitive massacre scene was included in the film’s original trailer, and you can catch a quick, fragmented snippet of it by clicking here).

The studio did not, however, act quite swiftly enough to stop the publication of a book by the same name, journalist Paul Lieberman’s Gangster Squad: Covert Cops, the Mob, and the Battle for Los Angeles.  The nonfiction work, which was used as source material for the film and whose cover features art from the motion picture, is still scheduled to hit shelves on its original release date of August 7th. READ FULL STORY

The problem with publishing the Joe Paterno biography

It’s hard to remember these days that once upon a time, Joseph Paterno was above all described as “America’s winningest college football coach, who changed the country one football player at a time.”

Indeed, in the ongoing aftermath of a scandal that rocked both sport and nation alike, Paterno is now more immediately–if not exclusively–recognized as one of several powerful men that for 14 years “failed to take any steps” to protect child sexual abuse victims, some of which were suffering under his supposedly hallowed locker-room roof.

It is in this pickle of epithets that book publisher Simon & Schuster currently finds itself when it comes to the handling of one of its upcoming releases.  That book?  Sportswriter-turned-author Joe Posnanski’s biography Paterno.

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'Fifty Shades of Grey' getting yanked from some library shelves

E L James’ kinky bondage-themed Fifty Shades trilogy is still finding a massive audience — the three books currently occupy the top spots on The New York Times best-seller list — but if you live in Wisconsin, Georgia, or Florida, you might have a harder time finding the titles in public libraries. Counties in those states, including Brevard County in Florida and Gwinnett County in Georgia, have pulled the “mommy porn” books from its libraries, deeming them “too steamy or too poorly written,” according to the AP. Other states and areas are expected to follow suit. READ FULL STORY

'The Collected Writings of Joe Brainard': Redefining a 'major' and 'minor' artist

Joe Brainard (1941-1994) was a marvelous artist – a painter whose work, including his collages and drawings, revealed a shrewdly intelligent man who was able to tap into a naif’s youthful innocence, a sharpie’s wit, and a commercial creator’s uniquely sophisticated sense of design. Brainard was also a sometime-writer whose words (and some art) have been collected in a “special publication” from The Library of America as The Collected Writings of Joe Brainard. READ FULL STORY

Check out the cover for James M. Cain's 'lost' novel 'The Cocktail Waitress' -- EXCLUSIVE

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Noir thriller giant James M. Cain is, of course, the man who brought us the twist-filled delights of Double Indemnity, The Postman Always Rings Twice, and Mildred Pierce. Cain died 35 years ago but it turns out that the novelist still has one more surprise up his sleeve. This September, Titan books will publish a “lost final novel” by the author called The Cocktail Waitress. According to Titan, the book concerns a young, beautiful widow who “takes a job as a waitress in a cocktail lounge, where she meets two new men: a handsome young schemer she falls in love with, and a wealthy older man she marries.”

Mmm, sounds like classic Cain territory. Certainly the cover of The Cocktail Waitress gives off an appropriately noir-ish scent with its combination of alcohol, cigarettes, and, naturally, sex. You can take an exclusive look at that cover to the left and, in larger format, below.

Pour yourself a martini, check it out, and tell us what you think. READ FULL STORY

Poetry you need to read: 'Alien vs. Predator': A review

If, starting with its title, Michael Robbins’ debut poetry collection Alien vs. Predator seems like a book custom-designed for the Entertainment Weekly audience – its verse studded with mostly-jovial references to Michael J. Fox, Eddie Van Halen, CSI: Miami, and a dedication to Alex Chilton – Robbins is also doing some seriously entertaining poetry work over the course of this volume; it ain’t all Boba Fett and Ghostface Killah. READ FULL STORY

Vanessa Williams shares dark past in new memoir

Vanessa Williams’ problems — a scuttled Miss America reign, a troubled marriage — have mostly played out in the tabloids. Until now. In her new memoir, You Have No Idea (out April 17), Williams reveals that a family friend sexually abused her when she was only 10 years old. Excerpts from the book appear in the current issue of People.

During a trip to California to visit family friends, Williams writes, the family’s 18-year-old daughter crept into the den where she was sleeping and pulled down her bloomers.“’What are you doing?’ I asked. ‘Don’t worry — it’ll feel good.’ I lay there paralyzed. What was going on? I didn’t speak. She kept at [the molestation] for I don’t know how long. She slid my bloomers back up and whispered: ‘Don’t tell anyone.’”

Williams did as she was told and kept it a secret for years. In fact, the Desperate Housewives actress says she didn’t understand what happened to her until many years later.

She tells People that she’s moved on. “I don’t dwell,” she said. Instead, she uses the tale as a learning experience for her children: Melanie, 24, Jillian, 22, Devin, 19, and Sasha, 11.

“I was verbal about it so they knew what to look for,” she said. “It was part of my journey that led me to them and to where I am today.”

Read more:
‘Portlandia’ star Carrie Brownstein to write music memoir
Kevin Smith talks about his memoir ‘Tough Sh*t’ and Liam Neeson’s nether regions
Rachel Dratch talks her new memoir, ’30 Rock,’ Amy Poehler, and her new pilot

'The Hunger Games' ignites the ALA's list of most challenged books

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The Hunger Games movie may not have had trouble earning a PG-13 rating, but many parents and educators are wondering whether the best-selling book trilogy belongs on library shelves. The American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom released its annual list of most frequently challenged books of 2011 yesterday, and the increased popularity of Suzanne Collins’ dystopian saga — in large part fueled by buzz surrounding the blockbuster film — drove the books higher on the list. In 2010, only the first novel cracked the top ten at number five. In 2011, all three books occupy the number three position, and the complaints have grown more varied: “anti-ethnic; anti-family; insensitivity; offensive language; occult/satanic; violence.” READ FULL STORY

Socialite Dara-Lynn Weiss nabs book deal after controversial Vogue essay about her child's weight loss

Jennifer Lopez may have graced the cover of Vogue’s April Shape issue, but it’s an essay inside the magazine that’s generating the most chatter.

After writing a controversial piece about putting her seven-year-old daughter on a year-long diet, Manhattan socialite Dara-Lynn Weiss has nabbed a book deal with Random House’s Ballantine, according to MediaBistro.
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Kevin Smith talks about his memoir 'Tough Sh*t' and Liam Neeson's nether regions

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Those who have perused the current issue of Entertainment Weekly know it features a Q&A with director Kevin Smith in which he talks about his troubled working relationship with Bruce Willis on Cop Out, the 2010 incident where he was removed from a Southwest Airlines flight because of his weight, and his new memoir-cum-self-help book, Tough Sh*t: Life Advice From a Fat, Lazy Slob Who Did Good (out tomorrow).

But is that all the voluble Clerks auteur had to say for himself? Not even close. Below, Smith ruminates further on his new tome, why he hasn’t spoken to Harvey Weinstein for over a year, and the person he would most love to have read a Liam Neeson penis joke.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: You’ve published books before that collected your articles and blog entries and podcast ruminations. This is the first time you sat down and wrote a “book” book. What was that process like?
KEVIN SMITH: Honestly? A true pain in the a–. It sounded so much easier when I pitched it. Once again, I blame Twitter. I love Twitter and I blame Twitter for everything. I was online on Twitter for maybe a couple of months doing these things called “Smonologues.” People would ask questions like, “I hate myself. I’m fat. What the f— am I supposed to do?” I just wrote this monologue by way of Twitter, 140 characters at a time. Eventually, I compiled it and put it into a blog. I had about 10 of them and they were pretty popular and I said, “You could actually compile these into a book.” Once again I was thinking, I’ve already done the work, let me just publish it. READ FULL STORY

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