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Category: Twilight (1-10 of 20)

First chapters revealed from romantic time-travel thriller 'Tempest' -- EXCLUSIVE

The most important element of any time-travel story is the rules: what can the hero do, what’s impossible, and how does messing with the past change the future?

What we find in this exclusive excerpt from the opening of Tempest, the debut YA novel from Julie Cross, is that its cocky, time-shifting 19-year-old protagonist doesn’t understand the rules himself, and is struggling to figure out this strange, apparently instinctive power — though, like most kids that age, he’s not all that serious about his potential until trouble strikes.

Click here for a link to the first four chapters of the book, which comes out in its entirety Jan. 3, and let us know what you think in the comments.

Expectations are high for the novel, which has already had its film rights optioned by Summit Entertainment, the studio that produces the Twilight films. By releasing such a significant portion of the book four months early — and for free — publisher Thomas Dunne Books is, sort of like the hero of Tempest, hoping some actions taken in the past will positively influence the future.

See below for more theories on the excerpt.

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What We Learned From Stephenie Meyer's 'The Twilight Saga: The Official Illustrated Guide'

Twilight-saga

The official 543-page encyclopedia to Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight series hit bookstores Tuesday, offering in-depth profiles of even the most peripheral characters, outtakes from the novels, genealogical charts, and original illustrations (including the sketch of Bella’s wedding dress seen exclusively on EW.com last week). Meyer clearly wanted The Illustrated Guide to supplement her series, to put on paper the world she carried for so long in her head. Some of the book’s notable tidbits:

—It includes a 2008 Q&A between Meyer and her friend Shannon Hale (Princess Academy) in which Meyer says Jacob was originally an afterthought. “Jacob was born — as a device really — to tell Bella what she needed to know [about Edward being a vampire].”

—Edward’s first human victim was actually Esme’s abusive ex-husband from her pre-vampire days. (Edward tracked him down and sought vengeance for his adopted mother.)

—When Quileute Leah Clearwater first turned into a werewolf, the shock of seeing her transformation caused her father (and Charlie Swan’s best friend) Harry Clearwater to have a heart attack.

—Bella’s parents met at First Beach, on the La Push reservation, during Charlie’s rookie year on the police force. They fell in love and were married within a few weeks.

—Meyer offers an annotated playlist of songs that influenced certain moments in the series. The description of Edward and Bella’s first dance as husband and wife was inspired by Muse’s “Can’t Take My Eyes Off of You.”

—The book outtakes include a section cut from New Moon in which Bella got high on Percocet after slugging Jacob and hurting her hand. “How’s your arm?” “I can’t feel it. Is it still there?”

Twilight fans — who’s bought the book? Who’s planning to (or not planning to)?


'The Twilight Saga: The Official Illustrated Guide': See Bella in her wedding dress -- EXCLUSIVE

Twilight-Saga-Illustrated-Guide

EW has not one but two exclusive images from Stephenie Meyer’s new book, The Twilight Saga: The Official Illustrated Guide, which goes on sale April 12: Bella as a vampire and Bella in her wedding dress. A nice walk-up to the first Breaking Dawn film, no? I didn’t expect to like the first Twilight graphic novel as much as I did, and these illustrations are by that book’s illustrator, Young Kim, who did such a great job bringing Meyer’s characters to life.

What do you think? Is this how you visualize Bella in the upcoming film?

What does Stephenie Meyer's publicist do in her spare time? Write YA novels, of course

Prom-and-Prejudice_320.jpg Image Credit: Liz LigonElizabeth Eulberg has quite the day job. Her very intimidating title is Director of Global Publicity for Stephenie Meyer, which means she manages planet Earth’s insatiable demand for the Twilight mega-author. But on the weekends the 35-year-old Wisconsin native turns off the ringer to her vampire phone, holes up in her Hoboken, apartment, and writes 5,000 words a day. (She awards herself a cupcake on Sunday evenings for met word quotas.)

Eulberg, with the full support of her very influential boss, published her first YA novel The Lonely Hearts Club to sweet acclaim last year. Her new book, Prom & Prejudice, is a fun spin on Jane Austen’s masterpiece, told from the point of view of Lizzie Bennett, a junior scholarship student struggling to maintain her sense of dignity at a terribly snobby private school. We recently caught up with Eulberg, who somehow aims to publish a book a year while also handling all things Team Twilight. READ FULL STORY

Exclusive: Stephenie Meyer's 'The Twilight Saga: The Official Illustrated Guide' to go on sale April 12, 2011

twilight-illustrated-guide_216.jpg The bad news: It’s not another sequel.

The good news: There will be plenty of brand-new details in The Twilight Saga: The Official Illustrated Guide, a reference book Stephenie Meyer created to accompany her best-selling novels. According to a press release from Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, the $24.99 encyclopedia, which will go on sale April 12, 2011, includes “character profiles, outtakes, a conversation with Meyer, genealogical charts, maps, extensive cross-references, and much more,” including art by Young Kim, who illustrated Twilight: The Graphic Novel, Volume 1.

For her part, Meyer said, “I’m always amazed at how many in-depth questions my readers have about my characters and the world within the Twilight Saga. With The Official Illustrated Guide, I hoped we could incorporate as many details as possible, including character histories, like Alice’s back story.”

Let’s hear from Twilight fans–is this something you want for your collection?

EW Exclusive: Stephen King talks vampires in introduction to comics series

stephen-king-american-vampireImage Credit: Ida Mae Astute/ABC via Getty ImagesStephen King’s ‘Salem’s Lot helped to bring vampires back to their Bram Stoker origins, with an emphasis on the heartless, frightening nature of the bloodsuckers combined with a side-focus on real estate, so he knows a little something about the creatures of the night. In his introduction to the first volume of the upcoming American Vampire series from DC Comics, the horror maestro makes his feelings about how vampires should really be portrayed known: That is, as truly monstrous and evil, not fanged and fabulous. And most definitely not as “lovelorn southern gentlemen,” “anorexic teenage girls,” or “boy-toys with big dewy eyes.”

Click here to read King’s introduction exclusively on EW.com.

So is King right? Does scary beat sexy? Are you excited for American Vampire?

Why 'The Hunger Games' isn't the new 'Twilight'

It’s Twilight all over again.

How many times have I heard that in the two years since The Hunger Games came out? Too many too count. And I have to say, it continues to baffle me: These novels could not be more different. Stephenie Meyer’s is more of a traditional romance (populated, I grant you, by some pretty untraditional characters); while Suzanne Collins’ is a tale of war and survival.

Is it that both books star unforgettable women? I suppose you could say that in the most sweeping and general sense, Katniss Everdeen and Bella Swan are alike: Both have cores of steel. They know what they want, and they aren’t going to back down. But for me, any similarity ends there.

Forged by famine, disease, and unbelievable hardship, Katniss, 16, regularly slips beneath the electrified barbed wire fence to hunt and forage for her her family–a crime punishable by death. She’s not interested in romance. She’s not big on forgiveness (even when it comes to her own mother). And when her younger sister, Primrose, is selected by lottery to participate in the barbaric murder ritual called The Hunger Games, Katniss steps in and takes her place. Bella, on the other hand, has known sadness but not poverty or want.  Arriving in Forks to live with her dad, knowing no one, she’s the shy girl, the outcast, who’s suddenly plucked from obscurity by the ravishingly handsome Edward Cullen. Hers is the stuff of classic fairy tales; she’s a princess who must be rescued, time and time again, by her one of her two prince charmings, either the vampire or the werewolf. Frankly, compared to Katniss, Bella is simply the more passive character: For the most part, things happen to her. Katniss, on the other hand, copes with disaster by strategizing–and bulldozing–her way through the situation. Does she ever need to be rescued? Absolutely. But  she also rescues Peeta–a real or feigned love interest?–more than once along the way.

That brings me to the love triangle issue. Could it be that people compare the two books because their heroines must choose between two men? Again, I don’t find this valid. Bella, it seems to me, never wavers in her love for Edward, despite Jacob’s devotion. In contrast,  I’m left with the feeling that Katniss may very well not know what love is at all. She may have been too badly damaged by war, by deprivation, by emotional and physical torture to ever be able to love fully and normally. Whatever she feels for Peeta or for Gale, it isn’t the headlong devotion Bella has for Edward.  More importantly, the question of whom Katniss will end up with isn’t what drives the narrative.  In other words, the question isn’t, Which one will she marry? The question is, Will she live until the end of the book?

So weigh in, Shelf Lifers. Do you think Twilight and The Hunger Games tread the same territory?

Stephenie Meyer's 'The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner' tops best-seller lists in U.S. and U.K.

bree-tannerTwilight fans are, unsurprisingly, sinking their fangs into/slaking their thirst with/insert vampire pun here for Stephenie Meyer’s The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner. The new novella currently tops USA Today’s best-seller list and Little, Brown estimates they have already sold 700,000 copies in the United States. Deadline reports that that the British bookstore chain Waterstones expects to sell more copies of Bree Tanner than of any other book this year.

You’d think we’d be immune to being impressed by the monomaniacal buying patterns of Twilight fans, and you’d be right. Bree Tanner is only 192 pages, a fraction of the length of the author’s last book. But I supposed a small fix of Twilight is better than no fix at all.

What really makes Bree Tanner‘s sales remarkable, though, is the fact that the novella is also available  for free online at BreeTanner.com until July 5 (the site does not permit you to print the text or to download it to an e-reader, so you have to click through the virtual pages on your computer screen). That means fans of the series are standing in line and shelling out their money in droves for something they could consume without opening their wallets. Even so, Little, Brown estimates that only 75,000 people have read the book in its entirety on the website.

Exclusive: First look at Vampire Academy trailer-and scoop from author Richelle Mead

Spirit-BoundRichelle Mead’s Vampire Academy series has been a hit since the first book was released in 2007. The fifth and latest installment, Spirit Bound, comes out May 18. We have an exclusive first look at the book’s trailer, which will air during Thursday night’s season finale of the Vampire Diaries and as a preview before this summer’s highly anticipated movie Eclipse.

Mead spoke with EW.com about the trailer, what fans can expect from her new book, and she’s doing next.

What can you tell us about  Spirit Bound?
Spirit Bound takes place almost entirely outside of the school that gives the series its name, so that’s kind of ironic and funny. The characters are sort of on their own now, so we get to see what they do when they’re not within the confines of teachers and school rules. It’s less of a tearjerker; the other ones had these big sudden shockers that tended to leave people crying, so I would get email for weeks after the books came out that with people telling me how I left them sobbing. I don’t think there will be quite as much as that, but I can’t always tell that. This is going to be more twists in the story of the ‘Oh my God’ variety. People will still be surprised, and there’s still a cliffhanger, buy I think it will be less emotionally traumatic.

How did you create the series?
I’d been writing adult books sort of in the same genre, the paranormal urban fantasy realm, before that. I had two series, one about demons and one about fairies, and at the time I had extra time on my hands and I wanted to try something for young adults. I was kind of running out of paranormal creatures, so I thought, ‘Well, let’s do vampires,’ little knowing what I was getting into at the time with teen vampires. I had no idea it was about to become a phenomenon unto itself. READ FULL STORY

Stephenie Meyer's novella, 'The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner,' and the Red Cross

This morning Little, Brown announced a first printing of Meyer’s  novella, The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner. Bree figures prominently in the movie version of Eclipse, opening June 30 (and director David Slade was able to read an early copy of the novella). But as fans remember, she does not appear in the book until page 569, in a pivotal scene where Bella and the Cullens encounter some of Victoria’s wild vampires in the forest: “The girl was curled into a small ball beside the flames, her arms wrapped around her legs….Her eyes were focused on me, and the eyes were a shocking, brilliant red.” Of Meyer’s decision to donate money from the sale of each book to the Red Cross, Little, Brown deputy publisher Andrew Smith says,  “The plight of folks in Haiti and now Chile has been so much in the media, and very much on Stephenie’s radar,” pointing out that Meyer has been talking about the subject on her website for some time. (On January 27, she wrote, “I’ve been very impressed with the world in general and the Twilight fansite in specific in the support and love everyone is giving to Haiti.”) The website dedicated to the new book, breetanner.com — which will feature the book beginning June 7 — will provide a Red Cross link tied specifically to the novella. “We’ll be able to track how much Twilight fans are giving,” Smith says.

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