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Category: Movies (51-60 of 106)

See the spooky trailer for 'Beautiful Redemption' by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl -- EXCLUSIVE

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It’s finale time! Not for the new TV season that’s just getting underway, but for Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl’s best-selling southern gothic series, which began with Beautiful Creatures. The fourth and final book, Beautiful Redemption, isn’t out until Oct. 23, but we have an atmospheric and moody trailer to whet your appetite for Ethan and Lena’s last, bittersweet adventure — even though their movie adventure is just beginning.

Also, in the spirit of going out with a bang, the authors have told EW their favorite pop culture finales. Based on their tastes, let’s just say Garcia and Stohl could totally work at EW if writing hugely popular book-to-film YA franchises doesn’t work out. Who knew they were such geeks? (In the best possible way). READ FULL STORY

Hollywood producer Brian Grazer lands book deal

Brian Grazer, a.k.a. the Hollywood mega-producer with the crazy hair, is moving into the publishing business. The New York Post reports that Grazer has landed a six-figure deal with Simon & Schuster for a book that will chronicle Grazer’s 27-year journey to meet a new and interesting person every day. Overall, the book will feature details of the producer’s most intriguing encounters (though surely not one as amazing as this one) and “examine how curiosity and the endless search for knowledge drive creativity.”

Grazer has produced a variety of films, including The Nutty Professor, The Da Vinci Code, Frost/Nixon,and Cowboys & Aliens. He has worked in the television industry as well, producing series such as Arrested Development and Friday Night Lights.

While we wait for Grazer’s forthcoming book, I suggest you enjoy this Oscar ad featuring William Fichtner as Grazer. He’s got the hair down to pat.

Read more:
Brian Grazer talks replacing Brett Ratner, hiring Billy Crystal, and why you should ‘give a s–––’ about the Oscars
Brian Grazer replacing Brett Ratner as new Oscar producer
New Oscar host: Who will Brian Grazer choose?

Film critic Richard Crouse talks about the controversial film 'The Devils' in his book 'Raising Hell'

The story of 1971′s The Devils is an unpleasant one. Based on Aldous Huxley’s book The Devils of Loudun and a play by John Whiting, the film details an episode of alleged demonic possessions and exorcisms — and the innocent priest who was executed for heresy — in 17th-century France. And that’s just the plot line.

The real story of The Devils took place behind the camera, in the movie’s production process and its reception among censors, critics, and audiences. The intensity of the shoot cost director Ken Russell his marriage and tested the nerves of its stars, British screen legends Oliver Reed and Vanessa Redgrave. Later, after facing numerous cuts from the British Board of Film Censors for material deemed inappropriate (or, according to the Catholic Church, blasphemous), The Devils received an abysmal response from critics, was banned in several countries, and basically vanished for three decades.

In recent years, though, the movie’s seen a bit of a resurgence. Fan sites are popping up and bootleg copies with fewer cuts have surfaced (Russell lamented that a fully uncensored version simply doesn’t exist); critics, for their part, have begun to see the film in a different light, hailing it as a provocative masterpiece in league with A Clockwork Orange.

In light of this renaissance, Canadian film critic Richard Crouse has written a book about The Devils, tracing it from conceptualization to its disastrous wide release to today’s renewed interest. With endorsements from a litany of notable directors — Terry Gilliam, David Cronenberg, Guillermo del Toro — and first-hand testimony from many of the principal players, Raising Hell offers a comprehensive look into the making of this brutally controversial film. In our conversation, Crouse (who has seen The Devils nearly 200 times) talked about Ken Russell’s blistering visual style and his never-ending battle with Warner Brothers, and why this movie could only have been made in 1971. READ FULL STORY

Take a sneak peek at 'The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo' graphic novel -- EXCLUSIVE

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If the book, movie, and other movie weren’t enough, DC Entertainment will release the graphic novel version of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo on Nov. 13, written by crime author Denise Mina and illustrated by Andrea Mutti and Leonardo Manco. We already gave you a super-early preview back in April, and here are a few more to tide you over until the release. First up: Check out Lisbeth Salander’s hacking skills in graphic novel form.

Watch the trailer for Arnold Schwarzenegger's memoir 'Total Recall' -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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No, we don’t mean the 1990 movie. Or the 2012 remake. This Total Recall is Arnold Schwarzenegger’s upcoming memoir — chronicling his rise from Austrian bodybuilder to action hero to governor of California — and we have an exclusive look!

After leaving the governor’s mansion in January 2011, Schwarzenegger announced his plans to return to movie-making. (He did always say he’d be back.) He kicked things off nice and slow with a cameo in last month’s The Expendables 2, but his real big-screen comeback starts with The Last Stand, out this January. Until then, however, Arnold fans have his new autobiography to tide them over. Check out the trailer, which is epic in the way only an Arnold Schwarzenegger book trailer could be: READ FULL STORY

See the R-rated trailer for Derek Haas' 'The Right Hand' -- EXCLUSIVE

Derek Haas is no stranger to R-ratings, having written for movies like Wanted and 3:10 to Yuma. But it’s pretty rare for a book trailer to get an R-rating. Haas’ new spy thriller The Right Hand (Nov. 13) comes with an effects-heavy clip featuring Medusa-headed, bare-breasted women.

The novel follows three CIA agents: one captured, one on a mission, and one stationed in the U.S. When undercover field agent Blake Nelson disappears while undercover in Russia, fellow agent Austin Clay is called in. The title refers to the secrecy of CIA dealings: sometimes the left hand can’t know what the right hand is doing. As the CIA’s right hand, Clay’s search for Blake Nelson gets complicated once he finds a former nanny, Marika Csontos, who knows confidential Russian secrets. Austin must decide whether to follow orders or defy them in order to discover the corruption that could be taking over the U.S. government.

Check out the lightly NSFW trailer below: READ FULL STORY

David Sedaris is finally going Hollywood. Which of his essays do you want to see on screen?

How is it that none of David Sedaris’ work has been adapted for the big screen yet? The prolific humorist has always been protective of his essays, especially ones in which his family plays a large role. (Perhaps Sedaris saw Running With Scissors as a cautionary tale). But back in 2010, Sedaris gave the go-ahead to writer-director Kyle Patrick Alvarez (Easier than Practice) to make a movie of “C.O.G.,” a narrative piece from Sedaris’ 1997 collection Naked, and it’s now slated to start production this October, Indiewire reports. “C.O.G.,” which stands for “Child of God,” is based on an episode from Sedaris’ 20s when he and a fanatical Christian attempted to sell stones cut into the shape of Oregon at a local fair.

I could see a number of Sedaris’ essays being turned into comic, Wes Anderson-ish indies. Here are some others that I’d love to see in theaters: READ FULL STORY

'Star Wars: X-Wing Mercy Kill': An exclusive excerpt of Aaron Allston's long-awaited return to the starfighter series

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As a diehard fan of the Star Wars Expanded Universe — the books, comics, and videogames that tell stories far beyond the events of George Lucas’ cinematic saga — there was a line of novels published by Del Rey Books in the 1990s that was my absolute favorite: the X-Wing series. This magnificent nine-volume yarn set in the years immediately after Return of the Jedi focused on a quirky lineup of starfighter pilots fighting the good fight for the New Republic (formerly the Rebel Alliance) against the remnants of the Empire. It appealed to the deepest level of my Star Wars fandom. Why? Other than hotshot ace Wedge Antilles, these books didn’t feature any of the characters or plotlines from the movies. The X-Wing books are Exhibit A for how that galaxy far, far away is such a rich repository of storytelling beyond what’s on the big screen. Focusing just on the pilots, authors Michael A. Stackpole and Aaron Allston imagined Star Wars as a razor-sharp military procedural: think Horatio Hornblower meets Top Gun.

Since the ninth and last X-Wing novel, Allston’s Starfighters of Adumar, was published in 1999, the series’ stature has only continued to grow. Finally, after a 13-year wait, Allston’s tenth installment, X-Wing: Mercy Kill, is due in stores tomorrow. Check out an exclusive excerpt of Mercy Kill, which jumps ahead 30 years after the events of the last X-Wing novel, after the break. READ FULL STORY

'Batman: Earth One': A fresh take on The Dark Knight -- EXCLUSIVE

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If you’ve been reading superhero comics for awhile, then you know that Batman’s origin story has been told and retold countless times. Or exactly 913 times, if you have been counting. “915,” corrects superstar scribe Geoff Johns, whose prodigious bibliography includes memorable runs on The Flash, Green Lantern, and Justice League. On July 4, just a couple weeks ahead of The Dark Knight Rises, Johns will add another title to the list: Batman: Earth One, a graphic novel drawn by Gary Frank and yet one more retelling of the caped crusader’s beginnings. But it also happens to be a very good one, marked by a fresh, accessible, emotionally resonant take on the character. “I hope people bring that perception to the book,” says Johns of possible ‘not another Batman reboot’ fatigue, “because I think they’ll be even more surprised if they do.” READ FULL STORY

Nora Ephron's life in books: Read some of her best quotes

Nora Ephron, who died of acute myeloid leukemia last night at age 71, was perhaps best known for her films When Harry Met Sally, Sleepless in Seattle, and Julie & Julia — but she began her career in words as an essayist, and remained one throughout her life. Her essay collections — and for that matter, her 1983 novel Heartburn about her messy divorce from journalist Carl Bernstein — were funny, sharp, relatable, and highly personal, and they became even more so in her later years. Click through for some of the most memorable zingers, observations, and bon mots from her ever-quotable books.

NEXT: Wallflower at the Orgy

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