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Tag: You're kidding me! (1-10 of 66)

Archie Comics to kill off Archie, sort of

They say no one really appreciates you until after you’re gone. Now Archie Andrews, the hero of the long-running Archie comics series, will be able to discover that first-hand: An upcoming issue of the comic will flash-forward to the future and show how Archie meets his death.

Wait, what? READ FULL STORY

'On Such a Full Sea' debuts as the first-ever 3D book cover

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3D movies. 3D televisions. 3D…books?

Yep, you read that right. Riverhead Books has released what they’re dubbing “the first-ever 3D printed slipcover” for Chang-rae Lee’s On Such a Full Sea. Hitting the market at a cool $150, the title will be available as a limited-edition white slipcover, which shows the words rising off the edges – just as if you were to look at the book through a pair of 3D glasses.

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Lena Dunham interviews Judy Blume, 'Believer' to publish conversation in book -- EXCERPT

Lena Dunham and Judy Blume may seem like unlikely gal pals, but both have spoken in the past about their admiration for each other’s work: Dunham grew up with Blume’s novels (and even used Summer Sisters as an inspiration for her HBO show Girls), while Blume is a vocal fan of Dunham’s show.

Naturally, the duo had to meet each other and have a chat stat — and The Believer has made it happen. The magazine brought the two together for their first meeting, during which they discussed everything from the books they read as children, Blume’s tendency to make up books for book reports, and, of all things, horses.

Here’s an excerpt of their conversation, which will be published in full by Believer in a limited edition, 80-page book:

LENA DUNHAM: As a kid, what was popular? What were the books people read at school? Was it the Bobbsey Twins and Boxcar Children?
JUDY BLUME:
I never read the Bobbsey Twins or Boxcar Children, but—

Both boring.
My first favorite books were the ones in the Betsy-Tacy series. But they weren’t popular in school. I didn’t know anyone else who was reading them. I liked Nancy Drew, used my allowance to buy one every week at the Ritz Bookstore. In sixth grade I made up books to give book reports on.

You invented them?
I did.

You would report on a book that had never existed?
I did.

Were you ever caught?
Nope. I always got an A on those.

That’s incredible.
I just wasn’t interested in the kinds of books I thought I was meant to be reading. I wasn’t that interested in stories about prairie girls or horse stories. I never read a horse book in my life, but I thought that’s what my friends were reading and that’s what I should be reading—Dobbin does this and Dobbin does that.

That was the name of your series?
It was about a horse named Dobbin, yes. I made up the characters and the theme and I stood up in front of the class and I gave my report.

On the books you made up in your mind?
Yes.

That’s a literary hoax, basically.
I had never heard of a literary hoax then. Still, I knew it wasn’t right. The thing is, I was reading. I was reading from the bookshelves at home, but how could I report on those books? I tell teachers now, when I tell this story, I say, “How about just once during the school year, give your students the chance to invent books? See what they come up with.”

Did you ever say in the book report that you didn’t like it—that it wasn’t good?
I don’t think so.

That would be a whole other meta-layer.

The book, Judy Blume and Lena Dunham in Conversation, will be available for purchase by Believer subscribers only.

Literary Review unveils shortlist for 2013 Bad Sex Awards

Eat your heart out, Fifty Shades of Grey.

Literary Review revealed its shortlist for this year’s Bad Sex in Fiction Awards — a prize that, as the name suggests, goes to the worst, most embarrassing literary passage about sex. Founded in 1993, the award is used “to draw attention to the crude, badly written, often perfunctory use of redundant passages of sexual description in the modern novel, and to discourage it.”

This year’s eight candidates include authors Woodie Guthrie, Matthew Reynolds, and Susan Choi, who all included unfortunately awkward-sounding sex scenes in their writings this year. The books, though devoid of pornographic literature, had enough cringe-worthy paragraphs to merit the, er, honor of being shortlisted.

Check out the full shortlist — and some (possibly NSFW) excerpts — below: READ FULL STORY

See 7 Halloween-themed 'Awkward Family Holiday Photos'

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Awkward family portraits can be scarier than chainsaw-wielding killers and tainted candy — especially if your family goes all out for Halloween. From Mike Bender and Doug Chernack, the masterminds behind Awkward Family Photos, comes a holiday edition that will keep you laughing and cringing for the rest of the year. Check out a few ghoulish selections here!

See James Franco star in the book trailer for 'Actors Anonymous': 'I Am The Actor' -- EXCLUSIVE

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James Franco writes what he knows in his offbeat first novel Actors Anonymous (Oct. 15), which follows his debut short story collection Palo Alto (2010). The structure of the novel is based partly on the Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous, in that members of an actor’s support group make wild confessions from the trenches of their profession in each chapter.

In this exclusive book trailer, Franco and his fellow actors recite some of the maxims, confessions, observations found in the book, like “I’m a good actor, but sometimes I look like a bad actor,” and “I used to care about how I looked. Now I don’t care so much. Maybe it’s because I’m so handsome.”

See the video below: READ FULL STORY

See the cover of 'Grasshopper Jungle' by Andrew Smith -- EXCLUSIVE

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In a young-adult literature landscape that can sometimes feel generically dystopian, author Andrew Smith has always delivered something wildly different. Smith’s The Marbury Lens followed a boy whose magic glasses allowed him to see an almost unbearably grotesque other-world; his most recent, Winger, gave us an uncommonly funny, envelope-pushing teen narrator. His seventh YA novel, Grasshopper Jungle (out Feb. 20, 2014), goes far into the absurd but promises to run as deep as this other novels. Seriously, check out the official plot description: READ FULL STORY

Read an excerpt from 'William Shakespeare's Star Wars: Verily, A New Hope' -- EXCLUSIVE

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“Darth Vader, only thou couldst be so bold.”

Carrie Fisher may inexplicably have a bit of a British accent during the beginning of Star Wars: A New Hope, but this latest genre mash-up puts the epic space opera in the hands of the Bard himself. Debut author Ian Doescher blends protocol droids with iambic pentameter in William Shakespeare’s Star Wars: Verily, A New Hope.

Tapping into the vein of Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, William Shakespeare’s Star Wars follows the basic structure of the original Star Wars film but molds it according to the style of a Shakespearean play. Lord Vader still seizes the spaceship of Princess Leia of Alderaan in search of the Rebellion’s plans against the Galactic Empire. C-3PO still cries and complains about everything. R2-D2 still beeps and buzzes — but this time in flowing verse.

So if you’re a fan of Stormtroopers and/or soliloquies, check out Act I, scenes 1-4 of William Shakespeare’s Star Wars below: READ FULL STORY

5 facts you didn't know about air travel from 'Cockpit Confidential' -- EXCLUSIVE

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No modern convenience is safe from a tell-all book: Kitchen Confidential and Waiter Rant lifted the veil on the restaurant biz; Heads in Beds taught you how to play the hotel industry; and now Cockpit Confidential (out today) by pilot Patrick Smith, author of Ask the Pilot, exposes facts you didn’t know you wanted to know about commercial airlines. In the book, he covers all the mysterious ins and outs of flying today, including where your airfare dollars go, the secrets behind airport security, the truth about cockpit automation, the real story on what causes delays… and what about that in-flight customer service (or lack thereof)? Everyone loves to complain about flying, so you might as well be informed about your complaints! See a few facts from the book below: READ FULL STORY

Jane Goodall's new book delayed amid alleged plagiarism scandal

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Less than a week after The Washington Post first claimed that Jane Goodall’s latest book, Seeds of Hope: Wisdom and Wonder From the World of Plants, contained multiple passages that were lifted from other sources, Grand Central Publishing has postponed the book’s release.

The primatologist, who is most famous for her work with chimpanzees and the creation of the Jane Goodall Institute, wrote Seeds of Hope with freelance writer Gail Hudson. The book was originally scheduled to be released next month, before a total of 12 passages were called into question for plagiarism. Word-for-word copy appeared to be lifted from a website for Choice Organic Teas, as well as others, including several passages that appeared to be lifted from Wikipedia.

In an email to The Washington Post, Goodall issued an apology and stated that, “This was a long and well researched book, and I am distressed to discover that some of the excellent and valuable sources were not properly cited, and want to express my sincere apologies.”

We’re not so sure we would call Wikipedia an “excellent and valuable source,” but perhaps that’s one of the many things Goodall will work on now that the book’s released has been pushed back.

Read more: 
Pick the cover of ‘Eat, Pray, Love’ author Elizabeth Gilbert’s new novel
Take a sneak peek at the Twilight ‘New Moon’ graphic novel — EXCLUSIVE
The British crown ‘Goblinproofing One’s Chicken Coop’ as weirdest book title of the year

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