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Tag: YA (51-60 of 322)

Cassandra Clare's 'City of Heavenly Fire': Read an excerpt -- EXCLUSIVE

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The final installment of Cassandra Clare’s Mortal Instruments series doesn’t hit shelves until May 27. The good news? That’s only a few months away. The bad news? City of Heavenly Fire is veiled in all kinds of secrecy. I can only assume the manuscript is being guarded by lock and key somewhere in Idris. Fortunately, Cassandra Clare was nice enough to share a few non-spoilery details about the much-anticipated sixth book. (The cover was revealed earlier this month.) To sweeten the pot, she gave us an exclusive excerpt from City of Heavenly Fire. So, by the angel, read on!
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See the cover for Amelia Kahaney's 'The Invisible' -- EXCLUSIVE

The Invisible, Amelia Kahaney’s follow-up to The Brokenhearted, doesn’t hit shelves until Oct. 17, but we’ve got a first look at the cover today along with an exclusive excerpt. The book jacket features an illustration of a mechanical hummingbird, created by Nathan Collins of Bose Collins. “I love, love, love this steampunk hummingbird soaring across the city sky. It’s as if the designers reached inside my dreamscape and plucked out exactly the right pieces of the story, then made something beautiful out of them,” said Kahaney. “The bird is so strong and constructed with such amazing precision, but there’s also a sense of fragility and delicacy in the way the parts come together. I can’t imagine a better image to represent Anthem Fleet, the girl with the hummingbird heart who, though she’s fast and powerful, isn’t always as unbreakable as she appears to be. The Invisible finds her fighting to save her city while trying to protect her heart as she unearths long-buried family secrets that will change everything about who she thought she was. I’m so excited to bring this story to readers, now more than ever.”

Excerpted from The Invisible by Amelia Kahaney with permission from HarperTeen/HarperCollins. Copyright © 2014 by Alloy Entertainment and Amelia Kahaney. All rights reserved.

UP NEXT: See more images of the hummingbird!

Laurie Halse Anderson shares her personal connection to PTSD and teenage love in 'The Impossible Knife of Memory'

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Laurie Halse Anderson is most well known for her debut YA novel, Speak. Published in 1999, at a time when sexual assault, the focus of the central narrative, was truly beginning to become a part of the social consciousness, Speak is still considered one of the best YA novels of its time, and has even been incorporated into high school curricula all over the country. In the year of Speaks‘s 15th anniversary. Anderson is releasing her fifth, and perhaps most personal, YA novel yet, The Impossible Knife of Memory, which approaches the question many young people encounter when their parents go into active military duty: What happens when they come home?

The Impossible Knife of Memory is in stores now, and Anderson sat down with EW to talk about her own experience with veterans, Secondary PTSD, and finally writing a love story.
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See the trailer for Tonya Hurley's 'Passionaries' -- EXCLUSIVE

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Passionaries, the second book in Tonya Hurley’s Blessed series hits shelves today. In honor of the novel’s release, we’ve got an exclusive look at the trailer! Here’s the official description, then check out the video after the jump. “In Precious Blood, Agnes, Cecelia, and Lucy watched as Sebastian sacrificed himself for what he believed in, and now they have choices to make of their own. Will the girls trust in their destinies as saints and martyrs and perform the miracles as Sebastian instructed? Or will they lose faith in themselves and each other in his absence? Time is running out for them to make a decision, and the fate of the world lies in the balance.” READ FULL STORY

'The Ring and the Crown': See the cover for Melissa de la Cruz's newest novel -- EXCLUSIVE

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‘Twas the day before Christmas, so Shelf Life has decided to give you the greatest present of all: an exclusive cover reveal! How gorgeous is the cover for Melissa de la Cruz’s newest novel, The Ring and the Crown? The book doesn’t hit shelves until April 1, but judging by the cover—which I realize is not what I’m supposed to do—Crown looks really promising.  READ FULL STORY

'It's Kind of a Funny Story' author Ned Vizzini dies at 32

Ned Vizzini, the author of YA favorites It’s Kind of a Funny Story and Be More Chill, died Thursday in New York City. According to the Los Angeles Times, Vizzini committed suicide. He was 32.

Vizzini, a Brooklyn native, began writing professionally for New York City newspapers as a teenager in the late ’90s. His first book, a “quasi-autogiobraphy” called Teen Angst? Naaah…, collected several of Vizzini’s columns for the New York Press and shared its title with an essay Vizzini had published in the New York Times Magazine when he was still a junior at Manhattan’s prestigious Stuyvesant High School. The book hit shelves in 2000. His first novel, Be More Chill, was published in 2004.

That same year, Vizzini experienced depression and suicidal thoughts, which prompted him to call a suicide hotline. Vizzini subsequently spent a week in the psychiatric ward of Brooklyn’s Methodist Hospital. Vizzini would later fictionalize this experience in his acclaimed second novel, It’s Kind of a Funny Story, published in 2006. The novel was adapted into a film starring Keir Gilchrist, Zach Galifianakis, and Emma Roberts in 2010.
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See the cover of Maggie Stiefvater's 'Sinner' -- EXCLUSIVE

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YA fans, rejoice! Scholastic has plans to publish a companion book to Maggie Stiefvater’s best-selling Shiver trilogy. Sinner (which is slated to hit shelves on July 1) follows Cole St. Clair, an important Shiver character. From the official description: “Everybody thinks they know Cole’s story. Stardom. Addiction. Downfall. Disappearance. But only a few people know Cole’s darkest secret—his ability to shift into a wolf. One of these people is Isabel. At one point, they may have even loved each other. But that feels like a lifetime ago. Now Cole is back. Back in the spotlight. Back in the danger zone. Back in Isabel’s life. Can this sinner be saved?”

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Read an excerpt from Lisa M. Stasse's 'The Defiant' -- EXCLUSIVE

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The final installment of The Forsaken trilogy won’t hit shelves until July 8, 2014, but you can read an exclusive excerpt of The Defiant today! This series has been one of my under-the-radar YA favorites, and I can’t wait to read the sure-to-be-epic conclusion. Author Lisa M. Stasse emailed us a few thoughts about the cover and book: “Lizzy Bromley designed the covers for The Forsaken and The Uprising as well. I am totally in love with her work. It’s so unusual, eye-catching, and futuristic,” she said. “The cover for The Defiant has a lot of secret meanings hidden in it—including the color choices, and the two figures on the front. This is the last book in the trilogy, so all the mysteries get answered, but at the same time, there are some new twists and surprises. The characters have to decide what sides they must take, even if it goes against their instincts.” READ FULL STORY

The Best YA Novel of All Time? EW Staff Pick: 'The Outsiders' by S.E. Hinton

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As our “Best YA Novel of All Time” bracket continues, we’re unveiling our picks, which didn’t advance as far as we would like. Here’s the case for S.E. Hinton’s The Outsiders.

The Outsiders taught us that nothing gold can stay. And since it was eliminated from our bracket game, I guess the adage is true. But it seems like Robert Frost and S. E. Hinton failed to consider the staying power of a highly influential YA novel. The Outsiders was published more than 45 years ago, but it’s still gold in my eyes. READ FULL STORY

The Best YA Novel of All Time? EW Staff Pick: 'A Wrinkle in Time' by Madeleine L'Engle

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As our “Best YA Novel of All Time” bracket continues, we’re unveiling our picks, which didn’t advance as far as we would like. Here’s the case for Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time.

First of all, I’ve got to level with you — I never really thought of A Wrinkle in Time as being a YA book. That’s mainly because I read Madeleine L’Engle’s masterpiece for the first time when I was in fourth grade, a few years before becoming a young adult myself.

More specifically: It was recess. I was on the playground. All around me, fellow elementary schoolers were shrieking and running and learning the basics of social interaction, but I didn’t care — because it was a dark and stormy night at the Murry family’s 200-year-old Connecticut farmhouse, which was pretty much the coolest thing I could possibly imagine.

Given that last sentence, you can probably gather why I was immediately captivated by Wrinkle‘s charming misfit of a heroine: awkward, irritable, smart-but-underachieving Meg Murry. Like me, Meg wore glasses; like me, she felt like she never quite fit anywhere, neither among the dreadfully normal kids at school nor among her uncommonly gifted family. (As her child genius younger brother Charles Wallace puts it, Meg is “not one thing or the other, not flesh or fowl nor good red herring.” I had absolutely no idea what that meant, but I loved the way it sounded anyway.)

What I didn’t understand back then is that at some point, everyone feels like an outsider. Ironically enough, alienation is one of the most universal emotions there is — especially for adolescent girls.  READ FULL STORY

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