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Tag: Tina Fey (1-8 of 8)

On The Books: BookExpo to feature Neil Patrick Harris, Lena Dunham, Amy Poehler

The annual publishing convention BookExpo America began Wednesday at New York City’s Javits Convention Center. The four-day-long event will feature appearances from Neil Patrick Harris, Lena Dunham, and Amy Poehler, all of whom are promoting their forthcoming memoirs: Neil Patrick Harris: Choose Your Own Autobiography (Oct. 14), Dunham’s Not That Kind of Girl (Oct. 7), and Poehler’s Yes Please (Oct. 28); other events include previews and discussions of film adaptations. EW’s YA expert Sara Vilokmerson is moderating The Fault in Our Stars event with author John Green and director Josh Boone, and EW’s Anthony Breznican  is moderating the This Is Where I Leave You panel with author Jonathan Tropper and actors Tina Fey and Jason Bateman. In addition to these star-studded events, the first-ever BookCon, modeled on ComicCon, will take place on the final day of BookExpo – organizers expect as many as 10,000 readers to attend. We can expect that the ongoing battle between Amazon and Hachette books will be a topic of discussion during BookExpo. [USA Today] READ FULL STORY

Tina Fey and Jason Bateman to headline 'This Is Where I Leave You' BookCon panel -- EXCLUSIVE

Reasons to get excited about this spring’s first annual BookCon, which is sort of like Comic-Con, but for, uh, actual books:

1. Panel headliners include Amy Poehler, Martin Short, R.L. Stine, Stan Lee, and Cassandra Clare.

2. EW can exclusively announce that Tina Fey and Jason Bateman will also headline a panel, which will serve as BookCon’s kickoff celebration.

3. Tina Fey!!!

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Tina Fey's foreword to Thom Filicia's 'American Beauty' -- EXCLUSIVE

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If your favorite member of the Queer Eye cast was the dapper, comparatively mellow interior designer Thom Filicia, you’re not alone. Tina Fey has written a foreword to Filicia’s new book, American Beauty: Renovating and Decorating a Beloved Retreat (out today), in a way only Fey can. The book contains more than 300 lush photos of Filicia’s rustic and tasteful rooms and chronicles his renovation of a classic upstate New York fixer-upper. Check out Fey’s ode to the sweetest member of the Fab Five, found in the beginning of American Beauty. READ FULL STORY

Tina Fey's 'Bossypants' sells over a million copies, proving she can do no wrong

BOSSYPANTSWhether it’s showing up to the Emmys looking like this only five weeks after giving birth, or personifying the 90’s a bit too well, Tina Fey has proven she can do anything. It’s no surprise she went platinum — by selling more than a million copies of Bossypants, not by dyeing her hair to play younger roles — despite her book cover’s off-putting (or fascinating) hairy man-arms. Since its release back in April, the book of funny essays has claimed the top spot on the New York Times best-seller list for five weeks, and has appeared on the list for 23 consecutive weeks in total. On the most recent chart, it appears at number six. Next thing you know, she’ll be EGOTting. Or PEGOTing, in case this whole book writing thing continues to work out for her.

The reasons for the book’s ongoing popularity are pretty easy to see. READ FULL STORY

On the Books Apr. 21: Kindle lending, remembering Tim Hetherington, Tina Fey's booksigning techniques, and more

Amazon announced yesterday that it will offer library lending capabilities for the Kindle, but is there a catch? Key details remain fuzzy, or pixilated: When will libraries roll out the program, and how long will the lending period be? Also, not all books may be available as part of the program.

Intrepid photojournalist and Restrepo co-director Tim Hetherington, who was killed in Libya yesterday, had published a book in 2009 called Long Story Bit by Bit: Liberia Retold. According to the publisher, the book “entwines documentary photography, oral testimony, and memoir to map the dynamics of power, tragedy and triumph in Liberia’s recent history. It depicts a past of rebel camps, rainforest destruction, Charles Taylor’s trial as a war criminal, and other happenings contrasted with the hope for the future.”

Funnylady Tina Fey has to keep herself entertained while on her Bossypants promotional tour, so she’s been mixing it up while signing book after book. As she mentioned on Tuesday night’s Conan, she sometimes signs entirely different names (like Ina Garten) in fans’ books and at least once has inscribed, “Help, I’m stuck in a Korean Tina Fey autograph factory!” Maybe by the time her book tour is over, she really will have those man arms.

Do you know what’s truly dead? Spouting off little soundbytes about how books and traditional publishing are dead. Check out these common 21st century nuggets on non-wisdom that really should be put to rest.

The Long Island mansion believed to have inspired F. Scott Fitzgerald in writing The Great Gatsby was demolished earlier this week, but not before writer Christine Lee Zilka snapped some final photos of the home that had been standing since 1902.

Two anthologies have been marketing classic poetry to children along gender lines. Are some poems for boys and others for girls?

Tina Fey's 'Bossypants': EW review

BOSSYPANTS

Tina Fey is allergic to bulls—. If she comes within five feet of a pile, the uncommonly sensible, reflexively funny comedy goddess in eyeglasses will gracefully sidestep the stuff. And all the while, she’ll make wise and hilarious observations about the stink, counting as friends those who smell it too. It’s Fey’s 
 custom-quality, handcrafted BS detector that makes Bossypants so irresistible.

In this genially jumbled memoir-esque collection of riffs, essays, laundry lists, true stories, fantasy scenarios, SNL script excerpts, and embarrassing photos from the wilderness years before she received the gift of a flattering haircut, the great Miz Fey puts on the literary equivalent of a satisfying night of sketch comedy. As a result, some of the bits are better than others. Many of the chapters link together as a more or less chronological account from the author’s girl-dork years in Upper Darby, Pa., to her days and long nights on SNL, to her creation of 30 Rock and Fey’s sitcom alter ego (and beacon of hope to working women), Liz Lemon. (There’s also stuff on her turn imitating that former governor from Alaska.)

But Fey remains notably selective about the information she shares; while making jokes at her own expense, she maintains an inviolable sense of privacy. It’s the more freewheeling, improvised chapters that capture Fey at her sharpest (and most influentially feminist). I love her list of beauty secrets. I’m grateful for her comparative charts on the experiences of being “very very skinny” and “a little 
 bit fat.” I plan to steal Fey’s imaginary response to a rude Internet commenter: “First let me say how inspiring it is that you have learned to use a computer.” Oh, and a note to those who would ask Fey, a working mother, “How do you juggle it all?”: Don’t ask! If she knew how to juggle it all, she wouldn’t be so funny. Or such an excellent Bossypants. Grade: A–

See more EW Book Reviews

On the Books Mar. 14: Tina Fey and Steve Martin's joint show, James Frey's controversial Messiah, and more

Tina Fey and Steve Martin are putting on a show together in Los Angeles April 19th to talk about their books. Unlike lower profile authors who often have to road-trip to near-empty bookstores to hock their tomes, Fey and Martin will be gracing the Nokia Theater stage for a paying audience (tickets are on sale for $29 to $119). Martin will be talking about his art world novel An Object of Beauty, and Fey will be promoting her highly anticipated Bossypants.

If he can survive a verbal beatdown from Oprah, he can survive anything: James Frey clearly isn’t afraid of controversy. His new book, The Final Testament of the Holy Bible, centers on the second coming of Christ, only his Messiah is a pot-smoking, prostitute-soliciting alcoholic from the Bronx. Yikes–let the firestorm begin!

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After a taste of Tina Fey's prose in 'The New Yorker', we want more!

BOSSYPANTSIf Tina Fey’s New Yorker essay “Confessions of a Juggler” is a taste of what’s to come in her upcoming book Bossypants, we’ll be getting what we’ve come to expect of her: razor-sharp observation delivered with trademark prickly wit. Her writing here isn’t quite what you’d expect of a typical comedian’s book—there are a number of joke-free paragraphs, and, like Liz Lemon, Fey the author isn’t afraid to pontificate. She covers a lot of ground in a few short pages: the trials of being an extraordinarily busy working mom; women over 40 in Hollywood; having children later in life. Individually, the topics are nothing groundbreaking, but the smart-girl humor and Fey’s relatable honesty makes the piece readable and laugh-out-loud funny. Her rundown of the types of roles Hollywood gives women of a certain age is the centerpiece of the story for me: a villainous boss; several different types of overworked women, a lesbian therapist in “Disregarding Joy,” a desperate cougar-type in “The Wedding Creeper” in which she falls in love with a handsome videographer played by Gerard Butler … Brilliant! The essay is a taste, but not enough. Come April 15th, I’ll be shelling out way too much money for the book, despite the scary cover.

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