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Tag: The Fault in Our Stars (1-8 of 8)

On the Books: John Green, Veronica Roth have bestselling books of 2014 (so far)

We’re halfway through the year, and Publishers Weekly has commemorated the occasion by tallying up the bestselling books so far. Divergent by Veronica Roth topped the list, while Insurgent and Allegiant came it at No. 3 and No. 4, respectively. Different editions of The Fault in Our Stars by John Green filled out the rest of the top six. Both Fault and Divergent were made into movies starring Shailene Woodley and Ansel Elgort earlier this year—so if you work in publishing and want to make sure your book is a bestseller, try to secure a movie deal with those two. [Publishers Weekly]

The Wall Street Journal calculates the summer’s least-read books with the Hawking Index, named after Stephen Hawking’s often-unread A Brief History of Time. It’s calculated with the following formula: “Take the page numbers of a book’s five top highlights, average them, and divide by the number of pages in the whole book. The higher the number, the more of the book we’re guessing most people are likely to have read.” Turns out, no one actually read Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century. [The Wall Street Journal]

Two years ago, a new edition of A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway was published with 39 different endings. Later this month, a new edition of The Sun Also Rises with an alternate opening chapter will be released. [The New York Times]

Looking for something to read in the next six months? The Millions publishes “The Great Second-Half 2014 Book Preview,” covering the rest of 2014′s notable fiction, and a little beyond. [The Millions]

You can buy John Cheever’s home in Ossining for $525,000. [Page Six]

John Green to talk 'The Fault in Our Stars' at BookCon panel -- EXCLUSIVE

People of Nerdfighteria: You’re gonna want to read this.

EW can reveal exclusively that YA rock star John Green has been tapped to headline a panel at BookCon — which is sort of like Comic-Con, but for, you know, actual books — all about The Fault in Our Stars‘s journey from page to screen. The panel, scheduled for May 31, will also feature TFIOS‘s film team, including Fox 2000 Pictures president Elizabeth Gabler, director Josh Boone, producer Wyck Godfrey, and screenwriters Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber. EW’s own YA expert Sara Vilkomerson will moderate the event — which will also feature a sneak peek at footage from the upcoming film adaptation of TFIOS, which opens June 6.

READ FULL STORY

On the Books: 'Allegiant' outselling 'Hunger Games' preorders; two new 'Captain Underpants' books

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Divergent wins this week’s round in dystopian YA novel sales against Hunger Games, while Captain Underpants will be returning to shelves with two new installments. Read on for more today’s books headlines:

Veronica Roth’s Allegiant, the third title in her Divergent series, is outselling the Hunger Games in its first month of preorders at Amazon. [LA Times]

Scholastic announced two new Captain Underpants books by author Dav Pilkey: Captain Underpants and the Tyrannical Retaliation of the Turbo Toilet 2000 will be released Aug. 26, 2014 and Captain Underpants and the Sensational Saga of Sir Stinks-A-Lot will be published August 2015. [USA Today]

Google’s executive chairman Eric Schmidt and senior vice president Jonathan Rosenberg partnered on a book deal with Grand Central Publishing’s business imprint to release No Adult Supervision Required: How to Build Successful 21st Century Companies. [Mediabistro]

Authors Jill Brooke and Emily Liebert are packaging merchandise including apparel, mugs and nail polish with their books to help unlock book sales on the retail level. [New York Post]

Here’s an update on the Nobel Prize in Literature: Writers are chiming in on why more Americans don’t win the Nobel Prize. Ian Crouch blames European snobbery, while Radhika Jones writes that she’s “baffled by the chorus that rises with every autumnal equinox, of American critics lobbying for American writers.”

Some adaptations news: The Fault in Our Stars announced its release date, and Leo Tolstoy’s classic War And Peace will be adapted into a six-part BBC series to be released in the U.K. in 2015.

On to some bad news and, well, more bad news: American adults’ reading skills are below average compared to adults in several other developed countries, and those reading skills are declining, according to a study of 160,000 people by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. [LA Times]

To help take your mind of that, check out author Mark Forsyth’s list of top 10 lost words, including sprunt and wamblecropt. [The Guardian]

Or give author Sarah Hall’s short story “Mrs Fox” a listen. The piece just won the BBC short story prize, garnering her £15,000 in award money. [BBC4]

New Hollywood: John Green talks 'Fault in Our Stars' movie and his meeting with Obama

Including John Green in our New Hollywood issue was a no-brainer. Although a movie adaptation of his first novel Looking For Alaska never got off the ground, the upcoming big-screen version of his latest best-seller The Fault in Our Stars, starring Shailene Woodley and Ansel Elgort, has millions of Green’s fans in anticipation. Green talked to EW about his hopes for the film and his life sinces the publication of TFIOS. READ FULL STORY

On the scene: 'An Evening of Awesome' with John Green at Carnegie Hall

I’ve never been to Carnegie Hall before, and I certainly never dreamed that my first visit to the iconic theater would be to see an author. As I navigated the swarms of squealing fans to find my seat, I heard a young couple gushing about their attendance at the event. You know, the kind of gushing usually reserved for boy bands or Justin Bieber. “Oh, my God! I cannot believe this is happening! I’m totally freaking out! Like, it hasn’t even set in yet that this is really happening.”

And that illustrates the power best-selling author John Green holds over his fans. Green came together with his brother, Hank, and a slew of guest stars to present “An Evening of Awesome,” a variety show of sorts that totally lived up to its name. But you don’t have to take my word for it. The sold-out event was broadcast live on YouTube (watch it here), and has since acquired more than 40,000 views. Additionally, Carnegie Hall was No. 1 trending topic worldwide on Twitter. The moral of the story? Never underestimate the power of book nerds. (And I say that with the utmost affection, because I am one of those nerds…or should I say nerdfighters?) READ FULL STORY

Goodreads users select best books of 2012 -- FIRST LOOK

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The annual Goodreads Choice Awards are basically the People’s Choice Awards of books. Users of the literary social network voted on their favorite books of the year in 20 categories, and this year, there were some surprises — J.K. Rowling’s The Casual Vacancy as best novel? — and some slam dunks (Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl for Best Mystery, John Green for Best Young Adult, and Cheryl Strayed’s Wild for Best Memoir). Once again, Veronica Roth proved that she’s pretty much unbeatable when it comes to reader-voted prizes, winning the Best Goodreads Author award for the first time and the Best Young Adult Fantasy award for the second time with Insurgent, sequel to Divergent.

The closest race occurred in Best Historical Fiction, with M.L. Stedman’s The Light Between Oceans narrowly beating out Man Booker-winner Bring up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel. J.K. Rowling’s first adult novel most likely benefited from a large and devoted fanbase, as Casual Vacancy only became a finalist due to write-in votes — its Goodreads user rating of 3.32 stars wasn’t originally high enough to qualify it — yet it won the biggest honor.

Susan Cain’s Nonfiction win for her best-seller Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking made me smile — partly because I could picture a bunch of Goodreads bookworms really relating to it, and also because introverts, a sizable but often ignored and misunderstood demographic, have had a big year in 2012 with the publication of Quiet, Sophia Dembling’s The Introvert’s Way, and a buzzed-about feature in The Atlantic.

See the entire list of winners below: READ FULL STORY

Goodreads Choice Awards 2012 finalists announced

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Book nerds, you have some hard choices to make. The folks at Goodreads, the social networking hub for bibliophiles, have whittled down the field to 200 finalists — with 10 titles in 20 categories — for the Goodreads Choice Awards, voted on by Goodreads users.

In the Fiction category are some of the most beloved novels of the year, including Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walter, Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan, This Is How You Lose Her by Junot Diaz, The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker … and The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling? Rowling’s foray into adult fiction didn’t originally qualify for the long-list because it didn’t get the required 3.5-star user rating, but it earned enough write-in votes to become a finalist.

Another category to watch is Romance. E L James’ reps point to last year’s Goodreads Choice Awards as the tipping point that gave Fifty Shades of Grey a new level of recognition that eventually led to the phenomenon we all know about. Fifty Shades Freed goes up against Sylvia Day’s Bared to You and J.R. Ward’s Lover Reborn.

You can always count on Young Adult literature to generate enthusiastic online engagement. In the YA fiction category, the front-runner is certainly John Green’s wonderful novel The Fault in Our Stars. The #DFTBA movement should give him the win handily, although the dark horse might be Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein, which won a lot of fans this year. (It’s terrific). In the YA fantasy category, it’ll be a battle between Veronica Roth and Cassandra Clare to see whose extremely devoted followings will turn out in droves.

Go vote!

Follow @EWStephanLee on Twitter.

Read more:
See the new paperback cover of ‘The Age of Miracles’ by Karen Thompson Walker — EXCLUSIVE
And the 2012 National Book Award winners are …
National Book Award winner Katherine Boo on ‘Behind the Beautiful Forevers’, ‘unsexy’ topics, and ‘American Idol’ recaps

Read your way across the USA with this handy YA map!

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Young adult fiction may seem to be all about dystopias today, but there are plenty of books still taking place in the good ol’ US of A.

An Epic Reads user known as EpicGirl has put together this gorgeous map featuring a YA book for every state in the US. For example, Rosemary Clement-Moore’s The Splendor Falls takes place in Alabama, Jean Craighead George’s Julie of the Wolves takes place in Alaska, and so on and so forth. We can’t post the image in question here, but click on the link above to check out the map, then come back here to share your thoughts!

My top ten highlights:
Bloodlines (California)
The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer (Florida)
Divergent (Illinois)
The Fault in Our Stars (Indiana)
Ashfall (Iowa)
The Diviners (New York)
The Truth About Forever (North Carolina)
Beautiful Creatures (South Carolina)
Everneath (Utah)
The Raven Boys (Virginia)

How many states are you at? I’m only at 17, but I’m looking forward to a YA road trip, with my first stop being Shattered Souls. (What can I say? I’m a sucker for a cover with a flowy dress.) What are your favorites on the list? Can you think of any other suggestions? Perhaps we can inspire EpicGirl to create a part two!

Read more:
Amazon picks its 10 best books of 2012
Five reasons Shailene Woodley could make a great Tris in ‘Divergent’
Love ‘Divergent’ by Veronica Roth’? 10 other teen reads you can’t miss: ‘Warm Bodies,’ ‘Tempest’ and more

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