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Tag: Short Stories (1-10 of 20)

Short-story writer Mavis Gallant dies at 91

Mavis Gallant, the Montreal-born writer who carved out an international reputation as a master short-story author while living in Paris for decades, died Tuesday at age 91, her publisher said.

The bilingual Quebecois started out as a journalist and went on to publish well over 100 short stories in her lauded career, many of them in The New Yorker magazine and in collections such as The Other Paris, Across the Bridge, and In Transit.

Although she lived abroad, Gallant received several high-profile honors in Canada, including a Companion of the Order of Canada and a Governor General’s Literary Award for her story collection, Home Truths: Selected Canadian Stories.

Random House in Canada confirmed the death, saying she died in her Paris apartment Tuesday morning.

Although at least 120 of her pieces appeared in The New Yorker, her following in the United States remained small. Many of her books remain out of print, short stories tend not to be best sellers and as a Canadian living in Paris she often wrote about foreign cultures. READ FULL STORY

Jennifer Weiner writes another Halloween-themed eShort

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Although she might dread forced alone time with Jonathan Franzen more than ghosts or witches, author Jennifer Weiner taps into some more universal fears with her latest Halloween-themed eShort Story Disconnected (available today on on Amazon.com, iBooks, B&N.com, booksamillion.com, Bookish, and IndieBound). The story centers on Shannon Will (who will also appear in Weiner’s upcoming novel All Fall Down), a recovering drug abuser who begins getting mysterious — and extremely creepy — text messages once she leaves rehab.

Disconnected follows in the tradition of Weiner’s previous haunting eShorts like A Memoir of Grief and Recalculating.

B.J. Novak previews his new book, 'One More Thing' -- EXCLUSIVE

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Woody Allen. George Saunders. B.J. Novak?

That’s the vibe the ex-Office multihyphenate is going for in his first short story collection, One More Thing: Stories and Other Stories — the cover of which you’ll see for the first time above. “It’s a really great form — fiction with a sense of humor,” Novak tells EW. “It’s what I love to read, and it’s what I wanted to write.”

The book contains 60 stories, some short… and some shorter. “I didn’t want to write in the traditional  mold where you’d be constrained by anything,” Novak explains, noting that a few of his pieces are mere lines long –à la his pal Simon Rich, another writer Novak admires. “They’re all based around some idea played out to its limit, and no further,” he continues. “I think a lot of fiction tries to stretch — I was happy to go in new directions, but not if the story didn’t call for it.”

Novak has been testing some of those new directions in a series of live literary readings, an integral facet of his editing process. As he puts it, “A live audience really keeps you humble, and makes you desperate to entertain and keep their attention. I really wanted to be honest with myself; I didn’t want to be pretentious. I wanted to make sure these stories were captivating people.”

He’ll be testing those waters once again at New York Comic Con Friday. There, Novak will read some of his new material and sit for a conversation with Time Magazine’s Lev Grossman before signing a sampler of stories produced exclusively for the event. (The panel is at 1:30 p.m.; the signing begins at 3 p.m.) The sampler will include tales like “The Impatient Billionaire and the Mirror for Earth,” a piece about a wealthy but unfulfilled man that neatly summarizes the collection’s main motif: “Many or most of the stories are about someone who is doing fine, but becomes obsessed with the one thing that will make them complete,” Novak says. “And that was sort of an inadvertent theme I stumbled on as I wrote the book.”

One More Thing hits shelves Feb. 4.

See new covers for 7 Truman Capote books -- EXCLUSIVE

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Do shiny new covers make you want to re-read  old favorites? I’m not ashamed to admit that re-issues are one publishing marketing ploy that I’m entirely susceptible to, especially when they’re done with originality and care. Vintage Books recently released Breakfast at Tiffany’s and other Truman Capote classics as e-books, but these new editions, designed by Megan Wilson, might rekindle your loyalty to paperback. Like Capote himself, the updated covers (coming this July) are stylish and daring with an undertone of darkness. Click through to see the seven re-issued covers, and tell us your favorite in the comments. Mine is Answered Prayers.

NEXT: The Grass Harp

Listen to Stanley Tucci read from Etgar Keret's 'Suddenly, a Knock on the Door' - EXCLUSIVE AUDIO

Much-loved Israeli author Etgar Keret is a master of the very short story. In his latest collection Suddenly, a Knock on the Door, Keret delivers his signature blend of irony and pathos in portions typically digestible in 10-15 minutes. These “delicate wisps of narrative,” as EW’s Keith Staskiewicz called them, lend themselves well to a multi-track audio album of sorts, and all kinds of celebrities and A-list authors have offered their voices to the project. Here are just some of the notable individuals who will narrate stories for the audiobook, to be released April 24: Ira Glass, Josh Radnor, Jonathan Safran Foer, Willem Dafoe, Josh Charles, Neal Stephenson, George Saunders, Ben Foster, Mathieu Amalric, Aimee Bender, Miranda July, Ben Marcus, John Sayles, Gary Shteyngart, Stella Schnabel, Nathan Englander, Michael Chabon.

EW has obtained an exclusive clip of Hunger Games and Julie & Julia star Stanley Tucci reading Keret’s story “Creative Writing” in his distinctively warm, wry voice. Have a listen below! READ FULL STORY

'Oscar Wao' author Junot Diaz announces new book

It’s been five years since Junot Díaz’s first novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao and more than 15 since his first book of short stories Drown. Oscar Wao was a literary sensation upon its release in 2007, topping several year-end best lists and racking up major prizes, including the Pulitzer.

Díaz returns to the short story form and focuses on the topic of love in This Is How You Lose Her, scheduled for a Sept. 11 release. A description from Riverhead books: READ FULL STORY

Joseph Gordon-Levitt on 'The Tiny Book of Tiny Stories'

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Inception star Joseph Gordon-Levitt isn’t just a consummate actor-artist himself — he’s inspiring a worldwide community of artists to create together through his online production company hitRECord. The latest spin-off of his collaborative multimedia project is the ingeniously illustrated Tiny Book of Tiny Stories: Volume 1 (It Books), a print collection of works from the website. The title describes the book pretty accurately: Some of the stories inside are witty, some of them are meaningful, but all are very, very brief.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: For people who haven’t come into contact with hitRECord yet, explain what it is in your own words.
JOSEPH GORDON-LEVITT: It’s an open, collaborative production company. As much as I love acting, I also like telling stories, making little short films, music, art, writing, etc. Normally when an actor starts a production company, it’s sort of an insular, Hollywood thing, but I wanted to collaborate with all of these artists all over the world who are making beautiful art and don’t necessarily have the connections to work in Hollywood. That’s why we use the Internet and we put these projects that we do online, and anybody can contribute to them. I’m there directing, participating, curating, and editing, and we make things together. “Tiny Stories” is our most popular collaboration that we’ve ever had. It’s really easy to contribute to it. As it says on the back on the book, we had 8,000 contributions that came into this collaboration. From that we edited it down into this tiny book. READ FULL STORY

On the Books Aug. 25: Steve Jobs biography to be updated with resignation news, and more

++ Steve Jobs’ biography Steve Jobs: A Biography will include the Apple CEO’s point of view on last night’s announcement of his resignation. Biographer Walter Isaacson “speaks to Jobs regularly and is still working on final chapter of the book,” a Simon & Schuster rep told PCMag. This is the first biography with the famously closed-off Apple chief’s blessing, and we’re promised unprecedented access — Jobs didn’t even request a final review before the book goes to print. Steve Jobs will hit bookstores in November. READ FULL STORY

'Everything Must Go' director Dan Rush on adapting Raymond Carver

For his feature debut, director-screenwriter Dan Rush built Everything Must Go around the central concept of Raymond Carver’s 1977 story “Why Don’t You Dance.” But Carver’s story, as Rush puts it, is “pretty dang short,” so he had to make some bold creative choices to beef up the narrative. (Some other notable Carver adaptations: Robert Altman’s Shortcuts and Ray Lawrence’s Jindabyne). It’s a bold choice, generally, for any filmmaker to adapt Carver’s work. His stories typically center on disaffected, working class individuals in a gray-skied America; he writes with economical prose (kept even snappier with the help of editor Gordon Lish), and his characters rarely say what they mean. Rush spoke to me about the tall task of creating a cinematic arc out of a very short Carver story, and his decision to cast Will Ferrell in the main role of Nick Halsey. Everything Must Go is available on DVD Sept. 6. READ FULL STORY

'L.A. Noire' videogame inspires a crime fiction anthology featuring Joyce Carol Oates, Andrew Vachss, and more. PLUS: Read an exclusive excerpt

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Last year, Rockstar Games released the western saga Red Dead Redemption, a flat-out videogame masterpiece by bringing to life a particular time and place in American history with extraordinary detail and telling a rich, engrossing story that challenged the mind and engaged the emotions. Hopes are high among fans and critical admirers of Rockstar’s sophisticated, decidedly adult work that their next major title will prove equal to its Red Dead triumph: L.A. Noire, a murder-mystery adventure set in late '40s Los Angeles, a sprawling and stylish videogame iteration of the film noir and neo noir genres, typified by movies like
The Big Sleep (1946) and Chinatown (1974). Of course, vintage film noir owed a debt to crime fiction by the likes of Raymond Chandler (who wrote The Big Sleep) and Dashiell Hammett. To acknowledge the literary roots of its newest offering – and to expand L.A. Noire into a larger "transmedia" entertainment franchise – Rockstar commissioned several prominent authors to pen short stories inspired by the game and stand on their own as crime genre fun. An eBook compilation from Mulholland Books, entitled L.A. Noire: The Collected Stories, will be available June 6, about three weeks after the game’s scheduled May 17 release. "The concept behind L.A. Noire was to create a crime thriller that built on the classic tradition of noir, not just in film but also evoking the great body of crime fiction that exists within the genre," says Alex Moulle-Berteaux, Rockstar's VP of Marketing. "Chandler, [James] Ellroy, and Hammet were as much touchstones for the atmosphere and characters of the game as anything from cinema, so there was something appealing about [the]

idea of setting some of the genre’s finest contemporary writers loose within that world.”

Among the authors who’ve written original stories for the anthology: READ FULL STORY

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