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Tag: Science Fiction (21-30 of 66)

'Girls' guest star Bob Balaban really has written a best-selling series of books about a bionic dog. No, really...

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One of the best jokes on last night’s Girls involved Hannah’s therapist, played by guest star Bob Balaban, mentioning he had written a bestselling series of children’s books about a bionic dog.

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'Battling Boy': Paul Pope's epic creative quest to create a new generation superhero -- Exclusive Excerpt!

“What is the Superman we need for today?” The question haunts Paul Pope, and the comic book artist’s long-awaited opus Battling Boy, which publisher First Second Books will release on October 8. The graphic novel — the first of two volumes which combined will exceed 400 pages — represents the first major work from this leading light of independent comics since his mainstream breakthrough in 2006, the Eisner winning Batman: Year 100, a future-punk take on the dark knight rendered in his distinctive Kirby-strong storytelling that mixes kinetic Manga energy with expressive lines often associated with European comics. Battling Boy will arrive about three years behind schedule, and following a creative journey as epic as the saga itself, involving such larger-than-life characters as Oscar-winning producer Scott Rudin, acclaimed novelist Michael Chabon, and superstar Brad Pitt. Says Pope: “It’s been a strange couple years.”

More about Pope’s adventure through the Hollywood looking-glass in a bit. First: The book. Battling Boy is set on an alternate Earth – there are countless within this Lovecraftian multiverse — that’s having of a crisis moment: Monsters from another realm are terrorizing the dystopian sprawl of Arcopolis. When the ghouls assassinate the city’s high flying protector, a stern and gadgety Batman-meets-Iron Man type named Haggard West (he has a jet pack; drives a “Westmobile”), the suffering masses receive a new hero from the interdimensional mystical mothership from which all heroes come from: A haughty yet naïve superboy, the scrapping son of a war god. (You’ll meet both father and son in our exclusive excerpt from the book, which begins on page three.)  READ FULL STORY

See Beth Revis' 'Shades of Earth' launched into space -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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Before the holidays, author Beth Revis announced an out-of-this-world campaign to promote the release of the third and final book in her Across the Universe series: If fans pre-ordered more copies of Shades of  Earth (out today) than they did for books one and two combined, Revis and Penguin would launch a copy of Across the Universe into space. Today, we can reveal that fans rose to the challenge. After the jump, watch the book as it makes its trek to the great beyond (set to the music from 2001: A Space Odyssey, natch). READ FULL STORY

'Doctor Who' to be celebrated by LGBTQ fans in new essay anthology 'Queers Dig Time Lords'

The longrunning British science fiction show Doctor Who has repeatedly portrayed gay, lesbian, and bisexual characters in a positive light — even when the character in question happens to be a green lizard-lady. Now the LGBTQ community is reciprocating that affection in book form.

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The End of 'Sweet Tooth': A deep dive with Jeff Lemire about wrapping up his acclaimed comic book saga

Jeff Lemire isn’t just one of the most acclaimed talents in comics, he’s also one of the most prodigious. In 2012, the Toronto-based writer/artist’s illustrious output included the monthly serials Animal Man, Frankenstein: Agent of S.H.A.D.E and Justice League Dark for DC Comics (all of which earned Lemire an Eisner nomination for Best Writer), and the much-praised graphic novel The Underwater Welder published by Top Shelf Productions. But this week, Lemire’s workload officially becomes one title lighter when DC’s Vertigo imprint releases the last issue of his epic fantasy, Sweet Tooth. READ FULL STORY

'The Whistling Skull' review: One of the best comic books of 2012

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One of the best comic books of 2012 slides right in under the wire with today’s release of The Whistling Skull #1 (DC Comics). The first of a six-part miniseries written by B. Clay Moore and drawn by Tony Harris, The Whistling Skull is at once a throwback to pulp fiction of the 1930s and ‘40s (think Doc Savage and Sax Rohmer’s Fu Manchu novels) and a beautiful, witty new piece of comic-book art. READ FULL STORY

Geek Deep Dive: Writing the 'Star Trek' history book, 'Federation: The First 150 Years'

In my half-dozen years at Entertainment Weekly, I have never received an object as deliciously deep-dish geeky as David A. Goodman’s Federation: The First 150 Years. (Sorry, two-volume, 12 pound graphic novelization of Stephen King’s The Dark Tower. You had a really good run there.)

As any Trekkie has likely ascertained already, Federation (out now) is a history of Star Trek‘s United Federation of Planets — the grand interstellar organization at the heart of Gene Roddenberry’s wagon train to the stars — written as if it really happened, from life on a war-ravaged Earth in the 1990s through the death of James T. Kirk. The book comes with translated historical documents, rare archival artifacts, and a light-up pedestal that features the voice of George Takei as Admiral Hikaru Sulu, commander-and-chief of Starfleet, introducing the reader to the tome before them.

Like I said: Deep. Dish. Geeky. READ FULL STORY

'The Walking Dead': First taste of 'The Road to Woodbury' prequel -- EXCLUSIVE

Last year, Walking Dead creator Robert Kirkman began to flesh out the backstory for the most notorious character from his comic books with a novel titled Rise of the Governor (co-written by Jay Bonansinga). Now, that prequel backstory continues with the duo’s follow-up book — The Walking Dead: The Road to Woodbury. In the story (which will be released in print, digital and audio versions on Oct. 16), a struggling survivor named Lilly Caul (also from the comics) stumbles upon a fortress of a town called Woodbury, Ga. It’s a town being run by a man called Philip Blake. Only Blake has recently begun to call himself something else entirely: the Governor. Tensions rise when Lilly takes on the man in charge. READ FULL STORY

An extraterrestrial interview with 'Rise of Nine' author Pittacus Lore -- EXCLUSIVE

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When Lorien elder Pittacus Lore called me earlier this week, I had a hard time understanding him at first. Of course it was due to the voice-changer he was using to hide his identity, as he is in the midst of a high-stakes, intergalactic battle against the Mogadorians. At great personal risk, Lore spoke to EW about his new book Rise of Nine (Aug. 21) in the Lorien Legacies series. He also shared his thoughts on the I Am Number Four movie and what Loriens like to read and watch. Also read on for news of Lore’s possible book signing appearances in the future.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Your books have been widely read since I Am Number Four. Are you loving the author’s life?
PITTACUS LORE: I don’t live an author’s life. I live the life of a general at war. While I have been writing the books during moments of peace, my full-time job is hunting and killing Mogadorians. That being said, I appreciate all the support we have gotten from readers around the world. READ FULL STORY

'Star Wars: X-Wing Mercy Kill': An exclusive excerpt of Aaron Allston's long-awaited return to the starfighter series

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As a diehard fan of the Star Wars Expanded Universe — the books, comics, and videogames that tell stories far beyond the events of George Lucas’ cinematic saga — there was a line of novels published by Del Rey Books in the 1990s that was my absolute favorite: the X-Wing series. This magnificent nine-volume yarn set in the years immediately after Return of the Jedi focused on a quirky lineup of starfighter pilots fighting the good fight for the New Republic (formerly the Rebel Alliance) against the remnants of the Empire. It appealed to the deepest level of my Star Wars fandom. Why? Other than hotshot ace Wedge Antilles, these books didn’t feature any of the characters or plotlines from the movies. The X-Wing books are Exhibit A for how that galaxy far, far away is such a rich repository of storytelling beyond what’s on the big screen. Focusing just on the pilots, authors Michael A. Stackpole and Aaron Allston imagined Star Wars as a razor-sharp military procedural: think Horatio Hornblower meets Top Gun.

Since the ninth and last X-Wing novel, Allston’s Starfighters of Adumar, was published in 1999, the series’ stature has only continued to grow. Finally, after a 13-year wait, Allston’s tenth installment, X-Wing: Mercy Kill, is due in stores tomorrow. Check out an exclusive excerpt of Mercy Kill, which jumps ahead 30 years after the events of the last X-Wing novel, after the break. READ FULL STORY

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