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Tag: Nonfiction (31-40 of 111)

Lena Dunham shopping advice book -- What do you want to see in it?

For $1 million you can bid on Lena Dunham’s first book. But hurry, the bids are due by the end of the day tomorrow.

Dunham’s literary agents are currently shopping around an advice book penned by the Girls creator. According to Slate, the actress has written a detailed book proposal outlining the general content of the book, which will reportedly be in the format of essays. Some sample topics include Dunham’s first experience with sex, her attempts to eat healthily (including a diet journal) and her obsession with death. Overall, however, she hopes to help people avoid the mistakes she’s made in her life.

Since I do not readily have $1 million on hand, I’ve made a wish list for what I’d to see in Dunham’s advice book instead.

READ FULL STORY

Hollywood producer Brian Grazer lands book deal

Brian Grazer, a.k.a. the Hollywood mega-producer with the crazy hair, is moving into the publishing business. The New York Post reports that Grazer has landed a six-figure deal with Simon & Schuster for a book that will chronicle Grazer’s 27-year journey to meet a new and interesting person every day. Overall, the book will feature details of the producer’s most intriguing encounters (though surely not one as amazing as this one) and “examine how curiosity and the endless search for knowledge drive creativity.”

Grazer has produced a variety of films, including The Nutty Professor, The Da Vinci Code, Frost/Nixon,and Cowboys & Aliens. He has worked in the television industry as well, producing series such as Arrested Development and Friday Night Lights.

While we wait for Grazer’s forthcoming book, I suggest you enjoy this Oscar ad featuring William Fichtner as Grazer. He’s got the hair down to pat.

Read more:
Brian Grazer talks replacing Brett Ratner, hiring Billy Crystal, and why you should ‘give a s–––’ about the Oscars
Brian Grazer replacing Brett Ratner as new Oscar producer
New Oscar host: Who will Brian Grazer choose?

Film critic Richard Crouse talks about the controversial film 'The Devils' in his book 'Raising Hell'

The story of 1971′s The Devils is an unpleasant one. Based on Aldous Huxley’s book The Devils of Loudun and a play by John Whiting, the film details an episode of alleged demonic possessions and exorcisms — and the innocent priest who was executed for heresy — in 17th-century France. And that’s just the plot line.

The real story of The Devils took place behind the camera, in the movie’s production process and its reception among censors, critics, and audiences. The intensity of the shoot cost director Ken Russell his marriage and tested the nerves of its stars, British screen legends Oliver Reed and Vanessa Redgrave. Later, after facing numerous cuts from the British Board of Film Censors for material deemed inappropriate (or, according to the Catholic Church, blasphemous), The Devils received an abysmal response from critics, was banned in several countries, and basically vanished for three decades.

In recent years, though, the movie’s seen a bit of a resurgence. Fan sites are popping up and bootleg copies with fewer cuts have surfaced (Russell lamented that a fully uncensored version simply doesn’t exist); critics, for their part, have begun to see the film in a different light, hailing it as a provocative masterpiece in league with A Clockwork Orange.

In light of this renaissance, Canadian film critic Richard Crouse has written a book about The Devils, tracing it from conceptualization to its disastrous wide release to today’s renewed interest. With endorsements from a litany of notable directors — Terry Gilliam, David Cronenberg, Guillermo del Toro — and first-hand testimony from many of the principal players, Raising Hell offers a comprehensive look into the making of this brutally controversial film. In our conversation, Crouse (who has seen The Devils nearly 200 times) talked about Ken Russell’s blistering visual style and his never-ending battle with Warner Brothers, and why this movie could only have been made in 1971. READ FULL STORY

See the irreverent trailer for Jenny McCarthy's memoir 'Bad Habits' -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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The road from God-fearing Catholic schoolgirl to Playmate of the Year is always a complicated one, but it can also be quite funny. Jenny McCarthy has already written six best-selling books, but she’s never delved so deeply into her ultra-religious upbringing as she does in Bad Habits: Confessions of a Recovering Catholic (Oct. 2). Growing up, the former Playboy mainstay dreamed of becoming a nun rather than an actress/model, and the book chronicles the many twists along the way that took her life in a very different direction.

Check out the irreverent trailer for Bad Habits, which follows McCarthy as she attends a reading group for nuns. It looks to me like a preview for an actual reality show on Lifetime. READ FULL STORY

Mark Owen's 'No Easy Day': read EW's review of the much-discussed new Bin Laden book

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“We just killed the number one terrorist in the world,” writes ex-Navy SEAL Matt Bissonnette, using the pseudonym Mark Owen, in No Easy Day, his much anticipated first-hand account the May 2011 raid that resulted in Osama bin Laden’s death. “The last thing we needed was our names attached to it. We simply wanted to fade back into the shadows.” It’s hard to fathom, then, why he wrote this fascinating book. Within days of No Easy Day’s announcement, Owen’s true identity had been sniffed out, and he found himself in an intense swirl of excitement and controversy. (Key parts of his version differ from the White House’s.) The publisher, Dutton, upped the print run to 575,000 and moved up the release date a week, to Sept. 4. The Pentagon is less enthusiastic; a Defense Department lawyer reportedly sent a letter accusing the author of violating non-disclosure agreements. (Bissonnette’s lawyers deny he violated NDAs.)

But while the military might be unhappy, readers will probably be thrilled. The book is a stomach-twisting close-up look at that historic mission in Abbottabad, told from the point of view of a super-elite member of SEAL Team Six who fired a bullet into bin Laden and helped carry away the corpse. Written in clean, polished prose (with co-author Kevin Maurer), No Easy Day often reads like a gripping novel as the author recounts remarkably vivid details about the weeks of preparation, the agonizing wait as the go-moment grew near, the scary Black Hawk crash that almost ruined everything, and the eerie minutes in bin Laden’s bedroom as the lifeless body of the world’s most wanted man lay bleeding. “It was strange to see such an infamous face up close,” he writes. “Lying in front of me was the reason we had been fighting for the last decade.” No Easy Day puts you right there for every tense moment. A–

 

Navy SEAL writes firsthand account of Bin Laden raid

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A U.S. Navy SEAL who participated in the raid that killed Osama bin Laden has written an anonymous first-hand, blow-by-blow account of the operation to be released on Sept. 11.

No Easy Day: The Firsthand Account of the Mission That Killed Osama bin Laden is described by its author, writing under the pseudonym Mark Owen, as an effort “to set the record straight about one of the most important missions in US military history.”  Penguin, the book’s publisher, added that the work provides a “blow-by-blow narrative of the assault, beginning with the helicopter crash that could have ended Owen’s life to the radio call confirming Bin Laden’s death.”

The project had been top secret within Penguin — word had not even reached Washington before yesterday’s announcement. The US government was said to be surprised by news of the book’s release and admitted to not having had the opportunity to review the book for any potential security breaches.

Should it be deemed that there is classified information in the book, Owen could face criminal charges. READ FULL STORY

'Gangster Squad' book still to be released Aug. 7

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EW reported just last week that Warner Bros, as an act of respect in the aftermath of the Aurora shooting tragedy, had moved quickly to push back the release date of its action-drama Gangster Squad from its original date of Sept. 7 back to Jan. 11, 2013.  The delay was implemented, above all else, to allow director Ruben Fleischer the time to edit out footage in which a group of men shoot up a movie theater from behind the screen (the now certainly insensitive massacre scene was included in the film’s original trailer, and you can catch a quick, fragmented snippet of it by clicking here).

The studio did not, however, act quite swiftly enough to stop the publication of a book by the same name, journalist Paul Lieberman’s Gangster Squad: Covert Cops, the Mob, and the Battle for Los Angeles.  The nonfiction work, which was used as source material for the film and whose cover features art from the motion picture, is still scheduled to hit shelves on its original release date of August 7th. READ FULL STORY

Oprah Winfrey sits down with 'Wild' author Cheryl Strayed -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

Last month, Oprah Winfrey resurrected her defunct Book Club specifically for Wild, a terrific memoir by Cheryl Strayed. In an in-depth, two-hour interview airing this Sunday at 11 a.m., Strayed will be discussing Wild and the events that led her to hike the harrowing Pacific Coast Trail alone at the age of 26.

While the book details her grueling physical journey on the trail, it’s really about loss — how the death of her mother emotionally gutted Strayed, and how she set out to mend the broken pieces of her life.

In the exclusive clip below, Strayed discusses the difficulty of writing about her mother without romanticizing her. Catch the full interview July 22 on OWN as part of “Super Soul Sunday.” READ FULL STORY

Goodreads list: 'Not Bestsellers Yet, but Readers Think They Should Be' -- EXCLUSIVE

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Goodreads users — like most passionate readers — are an opinionated bunch, so it’s rare for them to come to a consensus about any book. But there are some under-the-radar titles that users of the literary social network widely agree are deserving of greater attention and acclaim. The editors at Goodreads have selected seven books that, according to user ratings and comments, should be on the verge of breaking out. Click through to learn more about these dark horses in the fiction, nonfiction, and young adult categories.

NEXT: A page-turner destined to become a classic?

'Tipping Point' author Malcolm Gladwell's next book announced

Best-selling author Malcolm Gladwell has made an art form — and not to mention a lucrative career — of making the counter-intuitive intuitive in books like Outliers, The Tipping Point and Blink. Little, Brown has announced that his next book, scheduled for 2013, will be called David and Goliath. It is partially inspired by a New Yorker article called “How David Beats Goliath” that Gladwell wrote in 2009. The article followed a girls basketball team that defied considerable odds to reach the California state championship by reinventing, in a sense, the way defense is played. The book  Here’s more information from an official press release: READ FULL STORY

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