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Tag: Nonfiction (1-10 of 114)

'OITNB': Hear the real-life Larry tell his side of the story

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Piper Kerman‘s story has become a familiar one over the past few years thanks to first her memoir, Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Woman’s Prison, and its subsequent, semi-fictionalized Netflix adaptation. But what does that tale sound like from the other side of the marital bed? We’ll find out on Dec. 16, when Kerman’s husband, Larry Smith, will release the audiobook My Life with Piper: From Big House to Small Screen, in which he describes what was like to have his partner be sent to prison—and what it is like to be portrayed by Jason Biggs on the TV show.

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On the Books: 'In Cold Blood' case files to be published

- Since its 1966 debut, Truman Capote’s chilling true-crime classic In Cold Blood has been regarded as the original “nonfiction novel”—a revelation in literature that combined the factuality of journalism with the literary finesse of fiction. But a recent claim made by the son of the man who investigated the real-life murder case indicates that Capote may have taken more artistic license in writing the account than previously thought. READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Insider Prince Charles bio coming next year

- Henry Holt and Company has inked a deal to buy Time magazine editor-at-large Catherine Mayer’s new biography of longtime heir-apparent Charles, Prince of Wales. Mayer spent a year doing research for Born to Be King: Prince Charles on Planet Windsor, spending time with friends of Charles, palace insiders and the royal himself. The book will be slightly pared down from the U.K./international edition from WH Allen. Born to Be King “reveals Prince Charles in all his complexity,” according to Holt, giving “fresh and fascinating insights into the first marriage that did so much to define him”—with Princess Diana, who died in a car accident in 1997, as well as his current wife, Duchess Camilla. The biography is set to be published in February 2015. [Publishers Weekly] READ FULL STORY

'Hi doggie!': Hear 'The Room' star Greg Sestero read from his memoir -- EXCLUSIVE AUDIOBOOK EXCERPT

When Entertainment Weekly first spoke to actor Greg Sestero back in 2008 the cult which surrounded his film The Room was still a small, mostly Los Angeles-based affair. Six years on, director-writer-star Tommy Wiseau’s fantastically awful film has become famous around the world and Sestero’s recent memoir The Disaster Artist – which concerns both the film’s production and his friendship with Wiseau — has been optioned by James Franco. READ FULL STORY

On The Books: Jimmy Carter talks biblical misogyny and an author imagines Hitler is a comedian

It’s a weird collection of book news this Monday. To start with, Jimmy Carter has a new book, A Call to Action: Women, Religion, Violence, and Power, which hits shelves tomorrow. The 39th President has published more than 25 books during his career, covering everything from history to politics to “The Virtues of Aging.” But his newest book is on the subjugation of women around the world, looking closely at how religion is used as a tool of oppression. NPR interviewed the former president this weekend and you can listen to an excerpt on their website.

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On The Books: join the Beat Generation with Ferlinghetti's travel journals

Lawrence Ferlinghetti, the Beat poet and co-founder of City Lights Bookstore in San Francisco, has sold the rights to his travel journals to Liveright Publishing. They plan to release the collection, titled Writing Across the Landscape: Travel Journals (1950-2013), in September 2015. It sounds like it will be a counterculture travel guide and a historical snapshot of the second half of the 20th century rolled into one. The New York Times reports:

The journal material, most of it being published for the first time, sheds as much light on Mr. Ferlinghetti’s political passions as on his relationships with the Beat writers. His itinerary takes him to Mexico, Haiti and North Africa, to Cuba in the throes of the Castro revolution, to Franco’s Spain, to Soviet Russia for the 1968 Writers’ Congress, and to Nicaragua under the Sandinistas. It also includes his frequent trips to Italy and to France, where he lived for four years while pursuing a doctorate at the Sorbonne in Paris. Along the way, he records his encounters with Pablo Neruda, Ezra Pound, Ernesto Cardenal, Yevgeny Yevtushenko and Andrei Voznesensky.

On April 18th, Haruki Murakami will publish his first collection of short stories in nine years. The title “Onna no Inai Otokotachi” translates to “Men Without Women” and will be a compilation of short novels that have previously appeared in magazines, as well as one new offering. Apparently there was some scandal around the story “Drive My Car — Men Without Women.” The town featured in the story was offended by Murakami’s portrayal. Supposedly he apologized, but then he went and named the whole collection after that story, so that’s confusing. I’ll chalk it up to “lost in translation.” [Yahoo]

Some post-grad student at Cambridge translated Lorem Ipsum, that swatch of dummy text that acts as a placeholder in the publishing biz. I love finding meaning in nonsense. It’s almost a superstition, when I walk down the street and I try to make sentences out of the snippets of words from graffiti, old posters, torn stickers–in case it’s a secret message for me. Like the little boy in Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. In this case, it paid off. The translated paragraph reads almost like e.e. cummings. The first sentence: “Rrow itself, let it be sorrow; let him love it; let him pursue it, ishing for its acquisitiendum.” This doesn’t come as a total surprise because the text was originally pasted together by a 16th-century printer who “got there by mangling Cicero’s ‘De finibus bonorum et malorum’, an exposition of Stoicism, Epicureanism and the Platonism of Antiochus of Ascalon.” [London Review of Books]
Over at the Guardian, Adrian McKinty has written a literary jaunt through the historical and futuristic settings of fantasy novels, all in service of the question: When and where is Game of Thrones set? Read it for a full explanation because he has some very interesting examples, but his final conclusion is that Game of Thrones is set “not in some canned version of our medieval past but in the far future when the continents have shifted and some humans have evolved extraordinary physical and mental abilities which, to paraphrase Arthur C. Clarke, are indistinguishable from magic…As the sun expands, Earth’s orbit becomes more eccentric and massive variations in climate are to be expected, resulting in stretched-out summers and long, deadly winters.”

On The Books: Murakami's new novel; plus, audiobooks with Neil Gaiman, Roald Dahl, Bill Bryson

Haruki Murakami’s new novel, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, will be published in the U.S. on August 12th. The book has been out in Japan since last April and sold more than a million copies in its first week. The Guardian writes that the story “hinges around Tsukuru Tazaki, an isolated 36-year-old man struggling to overcome the trauma of rejection by his high-school friends years earlier. Like its title, the novel’s opening line might not sound like obvious best-seller material: ‘From July of his sophomore year at college to January next year, Tsukuru Tazaki was living while mostly thinking about dying.'”

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'Good Morning America' anchor Amy Robach to chronicle living with breast cancer in upcoming book

Back in October 2013, ABC news correspondent Amy Robach, 40, discovered she had breast cancer after she underwent an on-air mammogram at the urging of her Good Morning America colleague Robin Roberts. In an as-yet-untitled memoir acquired by Ballantine Bantam Dell, Robach will chronicle her living with and treating her cancer while continuing her career at ABC News and raising a family with her husband Andrew Shue.

“This is completely unchartered territory for me. I have covered the tragedies and triumphs of others for nearly 20 years as a journalist, but never before have I faced such personal fear, humility and uncertainty,” said Robach in a press release. “I want to share this road that so many have traveled before, and help pave the way for those who unfortunately will follow. Nothing is the same, everything changes, but the fight to live joyfully has been ignited.”

Author David Grove talks 'On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th'

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Given the fulsome tributes which followed the recent death of Lou Reed many folks may now feel well informed about the rock icon. But did you know Reed lived right next to where director Sean Cunningham shot his horror film Friday the 13th?

“He did,” confirms author David Grove, whose new book On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th features this nugget of information, among many others. “They filmed at Camp No-Be-Bo-Sco in Blairstown, New Jersey, and the property was owned by a man called Fred Smith. He kept talking to the crew about his neighbor, Lou. And the crew said, ‘Who’s Lou?’ And they discovered it was Lou Reed. He came by during filming and he sometimes played some music.”

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'The Pike' wins Samuel Johnson nonfiction prize

A biography of Italian fascist Gabriele D’Annunzio has won Britain’s leading nonfiction book prize.

The Pike, by Lucy Hughes-Hallett, was awarded the 20,000 pound ($32,000) Samuel Johnson Prize on Monday. The book tells the story of D’Annunzio, a debauched Italian artist who became a national hero.

Martin Rees, who chaired the judging panel, praised Hughes-Hallett’s “intricate crafting” of the narrative and said readers will be transfixed by her portrayal of “repellent egotist” D’Annunzio.

“Her original experimentation with form transcends the conventions of biography,” Rees said.

Hughes-Hallett has written two other books: Cleopatra: Histories, Dreams and Distortions and Heroes: Saviours, Traitors and Supermen.
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