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Tag: Nonfiction (1-10 of 110)

On The Books: Jimmy Carter talks biblical misogyny and an author imagines Hitler is a comedian

It’s a weird collection of book news this Monday. To start with, Jimmy Carter has a new book, A Call to Action: Women, Religion, Violence, and Power, which hits shelves tomorrow. The 39th President has published more than 25 books during his career, covering everything from history to politics to “The Virtues of Aging.” But his newest book is on the subjugation of women around the world, looking closely at how religion is used as a tool of oppression. NPR interviewed the former president this weekend and you can listen to an excerpt on their website.

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On The Books: join the Beat Generation with Ferlinghetti's travel journals

Lawrence Ferlinghetti, the Beat poet and co-founder of City Lights Bookstore in San Francisco, has sold the rights to his travel journals to Liveright Publishing. They plan to release the collection, titled Writing Across the Landscape: Travel Journals (1950-2013), in September 2015. It sounds like it will be a counterculture travel guide and a historical snapshot of the second half of the 20th century rolled into one. The New York Times reports:

The journal material, most of it being published for the first time, sheds as much light on Mr. Ferlinghetti’s political passions as on his relationships with the Beat writers. His itinerary takes him to Mexico, Haiti and North Africa, to Cuba in the throes of the Castro revolution, to Franco’s Spain, to Soviet Russia for the 1968 Writers’ Congress, and to Nicaragua under the Sandinistas. It also includes his frequent trips to Italy and to France, where he lived for four years while pursuing a doctorate at the Sorbonne in Paris. Along the way, he records his encounters with Pablo Neruda, Ezra Pound, Ernesto Cardenal, Yevgeny Yevtushenko and Andrei Voznesensky.

On April 18th, Haruki Murakami will publish his first collection of short stories in nine years. The title “Onna no Inai Otokotachi” translates to “Men Without Women” and will be a compilation of short novels that have previously appeared in magazines, as well as one new offering. Apparently there was some scandal around the story “Drive My Car — Men Without Women.” The town featured in the story was offended by Murakami’s portrayal. Supposedly he apologized, but then he went and named the whole collection after that story, so that’s confusing. I’ll chalk it up to “lost in translation.” [Yahoo]

Some post-grad student at Cambridge translated Lorem Ipsum, that swatch of dummy text that acts as a placeholder in the publishing biz. I love finding meaning in nonsense. It’s almost a superstition, when I walk down the street and I try to make sentences out of the snippets of words from graffiti, old posters, torn stickers–in case it’s a secret message for me. Like the little boy in Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. In this case, it paid off. The translated paragraph reads almost like e.e. cummings. The first sentence: “Rrow itself, let it be sorrow; let him love it; let him pursue it, ishing for its acquisitiendum.” This doesn’t come as a total surprise because the text was originally pasted together by a 16th-century printer who “got there by mangling Cicero’s ‘De finibus bonorum et malorum’, an exposition of Stoicism, Epicureanism and the Platonism of Antiochus of Ascalon.” [London Review of Books]
Over at the Guardian, Adrian McKinty has written a literary jaunt through the historical and futuristic settings of fantasy novels, all in service of the question: When and where is Game of Thrones set? Read it for a full explanation because he has some very interesting examples, but his final conclusion is that Game of Thrones is set “not in some canned version of our medieval past but in the far future when the continents have shifted and some humans have evolved extraordinary physical and mental abilities which, to paraphrase Arthur C. Clarke, are indistinguishable from magic…As the sun expands, Earth’s orbit becomes more eccentric and massive variations in climate are to be expected, resulting in stretched-out summers and long, deadly winters.”

On The Books: Murakami's new novel; plus, audiobooks with Neil Gaiman, Roald Dahl, Bill Bryson

Haruki Murakami’s new novel, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, will be published in the U.S. on August 12th. The book has been out in Japan since last April and sold more than a million copies in its first week. The Guardian writes that the story “hinges around Tsukuru Tazaki, an isolated 36-year-old man struggling to overcome the trauma of rejection by his high-school friends years earlier. Like its title, the novel’s opening line might not sound like obvious best-seller material: ‘From July of his sophomore year at college to January next year, Tsukuru Tazaki was living while mostly thinking about dying.’”

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'Good Morning America' anchor Amy Robach to chronicle living with breast cancer in upcoming book

Back in October 2013, ABC news correspondent Amy Robach, 40, discovered she had breast cancer after she underwent an on-air mammogram at the urging of her Good Morning America colleague Robin Roberts. In an as-yet-untitled memoir acquired by Ballantine Bantam Dell, Robach will chronicle her living with and treating her cancer while continuing her career at ABC News and raising a family with her husband Andrew Shue.

“This is completely unchartered territory for me. I have covered the tragedies and triumphs of others for nearly 20 years as a journalist, but never before have I faced such personal fear, humility and uncertainty,” said Robach in a press release. “I want to share this road that so many have traveled before, and help pave the way for those who unfortunately will follow. Nothing is the same, everything changes, but the fight to live joyfully has been ignited.”

Author David Grove talks 'On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th'

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Given the fulsome tributes which followed the recent death of Lou Reed many folks may now feel well informed about the rock icon. But did you know Reed lived right next to where director Sean Cunningham shot his horror film Friday the 13th?

“He did,” confirms author David Grove, whose new book On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th features this nugget of information, among many others. “They filmed at Camp No-Be-Bo-Sco in Blairstown, New Jersey, and the property was owned by a man called Fred Smith. He kept talking to the crew about his neighbor, Lou. And the crew said, ‘Who’s Lou?’ And they discovered it was Lou Reed. He came by during filming and he sometimes played some music.”

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'The Pike' wins Samuel Johnson nonfiction prize

A biography of Italian fascist Gabriele D’Annunzio has won Britain’s leading nonfiction book prize.

The Pike, by Lucy Hughes-Hallett, was awarded the 20,000 pound ($32,000) Samuel Johnson Prize on Monday. The book tells the story of D’Annunzio, a debauched Italian artist who became a national hero.

Martin Rees, who chaired the judging panel, praised Hughes-Hallett’s “intricate crafting” of the narrative and said readers will be transfixed by her portrayal of “repellent egotist” D’Annunzio.

“Her original experimentation with form transcends the conventions of biography,” Rees said.

Hughes-Hallett has written two other books: Cleopatra: Histories, Dreams and Distortions and Heroes: Saviours, Traitors and Supermen.
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Has Fox News fought criticism with fake commenter accounts?

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In a new book called Murdoch’s World: The Last of the Old Media Empires, author David Folkenflik — who is an NPR media reporter — writes that in the mid- to late-aughts, Fox’s PR team was tasked with countering “not just negative and even neutral blog postings but the anti-Fox comments beneath them.”

According to a book excerpt posted Sunday on progressive site Media Matters, Folkenflik even found one former Fox staffer who “recalled using 20 different aliases to post pro-Fox rants.”

“Another,” Folkenflik adds, “had one hundred.”

Allegedly, the authors of these fake comments went to great lengths to conceal their true identities. “Several employees had to acquire a cell phone thumb drive to provide a wireless broadband connection that could not be traced back to a Fox News or News Corp account,” Folkenflik explains. “Another used an AOL dial-up connection, even in the age of widespread broadband access, on the rationale it would be harder to pinpoint its origins.”

And the directive to fight criticism with comments apparently came from on high: “Old laptops were distributed for these cyber operations,” according to Murdoch’s World.

Folkenflik cites “four former Fox News employees” as his sources; he does not claim that current staffers are still utilizing these tactics.

Fox News has not yet responded to EW’s request for comment.

Shopping tips from 'Bargain Fever' by Mark Ellwood

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For the bad shoppers among us, journalist Mark Ellwood has examined the history of shopping and the current state of savvy consumers who consider paying full price passé. In his meticulously researched book Bargain Fever: How to Shop in a Discounted World, Ellwood goes everywhere from upscale department store Bergdorf Goodman to the crowded aisles of a Turkish bazaar to outlet malls in Pennsylvania. Along the way, he also imparts insider tips to scoring deep discounts. Here’s just a small sample: READ FULL STORY

Greg 'The Room' Sestero's 'Disaster Artist' memoir -- EXCLUSIVE TRAILER

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What do you do when you’ve appeared in one of the worst films ever made? Why, write a book about it, of course!

Okay, so that’s not what usually happens. But there is very little which could be considered “usual” about the infamous, so-bad-it’s-amazing 2003 film The Room, one of whose stars, Greg Sestero (“Oh, hi Mark!”), has now penned a book called The Disaster Artist: My Life Inside The Room, the Greatest Bad Movie Ever Made. Published by Simon & Schuster on Oct. 1 and cowritten with noted pop culture scribe Tom Bissell, the tome tracks Sestero’s involvement with The Room and his friendship with the film’s prime creative force-cum-onscreen love machine, the mercurial Tommy Wiseau.

Is it tearing you apart that you have to wait a couple of weeks before getting your hands on a copy? Then feel free to check out the trailer for The Disaster Artist below.
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Amazon announces its best books of 2013 so far

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2013 is about half over, and the books editors at Amazon have already chosen their top 10 books of the year so far, just in time for you to make a few additions to your beach bag. Unlike the film industry, there isn’t a clearly defined “prestige” season for book releases, so it wouldn’t be surprising if a lot of these titles popped up on year-end best lists as well — although there are still many highly touted titles yet to come in the fall, including ones from Donna Tartt, Amy Tan, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Marisha Pessl. Check out Amazon’s picks and snippets from EW reviews below: READ FULL STORY

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