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Tag: Neil Gaiman (1-10 of 17)

On The Books: Gillian Flynn takes a stab at writing comics

Gone Girl author Gillian Flynn takes a shot at writing a graphic short called “Masks,” and frankly, it’s a little terrifying. Illustrated by Dave Gibbons, the graphic story artist who drew Alan Moore’s Watchmen comic series, the comic is V for Vendetta except with masked moms who are exacting vigilante justice on high school bullies. In a masked frenzy, the well intentioned moms end up bludgeoning an innocent kid to death. This collaboration was part of a promotion for the upcoming comics exhibit at the British Library in London, so Flynn hasn’t forsaken her prose novels. But it would be cool if she got a taste for comics and did her next novel as a graphic! [Guardian]

Neil Gaiman is giving away free copies of Stardust on May 3rd! That got you excited right? Well, the fine print is that it’s only happening in Sainsbury’s, a UK grocery chain. Eff. When you pick up a copy of The Guardian in the grocery, you get a copy of Stardust to celebrate the paperback release of his newest book The Ocean at the End of the Lane. So Brits, get on that…and please send me one! [Guardian]

The Polish poet Tadeusz Różewicz passed away at 92. His poetry was deeply influenced by the European political turmoil of the 20th century: the insidious infiltration of fascism, the terrors of World War II, the rise and fall of the USSR. The Guardian reports that both he and his brother (also a poet) served in the Polish Underground, but his brother was killed by the Gestapo in 1944. His hard life led to his stripped down style of poetry, affecting and merciless. [Guardian]

I am an unabashed Celine Dion fan. Whether you love her or loathe her, Slate has an interesting essay by Mary Gaitskill, who wrote the story that became that movie Secretary (such a great flick). She picks apart why Dion is so polarizing (and it’s not because she’s Québécois!) and why our tastes in art can make us want to throttle artists sometimes. This is an excerpt from the upcoming book, Let’s Talk About Love: Why Other People Have Such Bad Taste. Need this. [Slate via NPR]

Rush over to The New Yorker because they have some new work by Rebecca Solnit! Solnit is both an avid environmental activist and a beautiful, philosphical writer. She’s written 16 books, including these amazing city guides where she layers old maps showing various forgotten and unusual aspects of city history, unfolding magical energy lines and mysteries. So far she’s done San Francisco and New Orleans. This essay in The New Yorker is an adaptation from her new collection Men Explain Things to Me. Brilliant title. [The New Yorker]

 

On The Books: Dr. Seuss' hats hit the road!

From there to here, from here to there, funny hats are everywhere! Dr. Seuss was a fiend for hats, which shouldn’t come as a surprise. But for the first time in history 26 of his hats will tour the world. These guys have rarely been outside of his house in La Jolla, and they’re pretty excited to visit six states in the next seven months. Can’t you just picture a Seuss book about his hats flying around the world? He used the hats as the basis for The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins. Reacquaint yourself with some of his art and design work here. You will not want to miss this exhibit. [NPR]

James Patterson, who’s sold a bajillion novels, is donating $1 million to 50 independent bookstores across the nation. A worthy cause supported by a man who is “one of the industry’s wealthiest writers.” [New York Times]

Wikipedia wants a book deal. Indiegogo wants to print the entire English Wikipedia in 1,000 books with 1,200 pages each. Trees around the world are shuddering. Even though they have proposed to use “sustainable paper,” this sounds like a total waste. Upshot: you could now reference Wikipedia as a legitimate bibliographic source. [The Guardian]

Neil Gaiman, the king of multimedia artistic endeavors, will be doing a live reading of The Truth Is a Cave in the Black Mountains backed by a string quartet playing music to accompany the tale of a search for hidden treasure. Illustrations by Eddie Campbell will  be projected during the performance. Shows will be at New York’s Carnegie Hall on June 27 and San Francisco’s Warfield on June 25. Stop it, Neil. We love you enough already! [SF Chronicle]

On The Books: Murakami's new novel; plus, audiobooks with Neil Gaiman, Roald Dahl, Bill Bryson

Haruki Murakami’s new novel, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, will be published in the U.S. on August 12th. The book has been out in Japan since last April and sold more than a million copies in its first week. The Guardian writes that the story “hinges around Tsukuru Tazaki, an isolated 36-year-old man struggling to overcome the trauma of rejection by his high-school friends years earlier. Like its title, the novel’s opening line might not sound like obvious best-seller material: ‘From July of his sophomore year at college to January next year, Tsukuru Tazaki was living while mostly thinking about dying.’”

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On the Books: Neil Gaiman's 'Neverwhere' removed from New Mexico school district

This weekend’s news featured a debate about the content of Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere, several upcoming anniversaries, and a philanthropic teenager. Read on for more of the top book headlines: READ FULL STORY

Comic-Con first look: New 'Sandman' cover by Dave McKean

Neil Gaiman’s Sandman gets an intense spotlight this week at Comic-Con International with a silver anniversary celebration and new details about Sandman: Overture No. 1, the October release that marks Gaiman’s first Morpheus story since 1996.

We’ve got two First Look images from that first issue below — the Dave McKean cover and the page one interior art by J.H. Williams III — but first a bit of background.

A whisper can be louder than a shout in the right setting at that was the case back in 1988 when Sandman No. 1 hit shelves and spinner racks with a Dave McKean cover that showed mixed-media ambitions, cryptic images, and a muted approach to color and text — all very strange in an era when the average DC Comics cover was about as subtle as an air-raid siren.

The story inside was worthy of the special treatment. In it writer Neil Gaiman introduced a pale, otherworldly figure: Morpheus, an imprisoned dream lord who yearns to break free and return to his kingdom.

Escape he did and that issue began the landmark 75-issue run that left fans dizzy with it’s breadth and imagination.  Now Gaiman is the one returning to his kingdom of imagination and McKean has another compelling cover to herald it. (Mouse over the image to get a magnified look.)

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Neil Gaiman on the spooky art of writing -- EXCLUSIVE

The same day Neil Gaiman’s The Ocean At the End of the Lane hit No. 1 on the New York Times bestseller list the author’s book tour made a stop at the Alex Theatre in Glendale, Ca., where he was joined onstage by Entertainment Weekly’s Geoff Boucher for a lively 80-minute conversation about the spooky art of writing.

Gaiman did a reading from the slender new release and (in a surprise) also from Fortunately, the Milk, an endearingly daft children’s book due in September.

The event, put on by Live Talks LA, is presented in its entirety below and reveals the unexpected path of The Ocean at the End of the Lane and the reason its protagonist resembles the author far more than the central characters in his best-known works, which include Coraline, The Graveyard Book, Stardust, Neverwhere, American Gods and The Sandman series for Vertigo and DC Comics.
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Neil Gaiman returns for new 'Sandman'

The Sandman is returning to Vertigo comics under the influence of writer Neil Gaiman.

Shelly Bond, executive editor of the imprint of DC Entertainment, said Monday that Gaiman is working with artist J.H. Williams III to tell stories of Morpheus’ world before he was captured. Titled The Sandman: Overture, the new series will appear bi-monthly starting Oct. 30 in comic shops and digitally, too.

Gaiman last penned stories in the realm of the Endless more than a decade ago. His telling of Sandman has sold more than 7 million copies in nine languages by combining epic story with mythology in a comic medium.
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Summer Must List: 10 books for your beach bag

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This summer, take some time to relax by the pool, in a hammock, or at the beach with these ten must-reads. From thrillers to tearjerkers to the undefinable Crazy Rich Asians, this list has it all. So if you’re stuck trying to decide what to download on your Kindle or buy at the local bookstore, click on for our must list of great summer reads.

NEXT: Claire Messud’s follow up to The Emperor’s Children

What we learned about Neil Gaiman's influences from his interview with NPR

When reading the wildly imaginative works of Neil Gaiman, one can’t help but wonder, “How does he think up this stuff?” The Coraline and American Gods author revealed a bit of what may be an answer to that question Monday when he chatted with Steve Inskeep on NPR’s Morning Edition.

The interview was part of the public radio station’s “Watch This” series, which has featured pop culture recommendations from the likes of Sherman Alexie, Kevin Smith and Lisa Kudrow. Read on for what Gaiman had to say about four favorites of his – and where EW can see these influences in his own works. READ FULL STORY

On the scene: 'An Evening of Awesome' with John Green at Carnegie Hall

I’ve never been to Carnegie Hall before, and I certainly never dreamed that my first visit to the iconic theater would be to see an author. As I navigated the swarms of squealing fans to find my seat, I heard a young couple gushing about their attendance at the event. You know, the kind of gushing usually reserved for boy bands or Justin Bieber. “Oh, my God! I cannot believe this is happening! I’m totally freaking out! Like, it hasn’t even set in yet that this is really happening.”

And that illustrates the power best-selling author John Green holds over his fans. Green came together with his brother, Hank, and a slew of guest stars to present “An Evening of Awesome,” a variety show of sorts that totally lived up to its name. But you don’t have to take my word for it. The sold-out event was broadcast live on YouTube (watch it here), and has since acquired more than 40,000 views. Additionally, Carnegie Hall was No. 1 trending topic worldwide on Twitter. The moral of the story? Never underestimate the power of book nerds. (And I say that with the utmost affection, because I am one of those nerds…or should I say nerdfighters?) READ FULL STORY

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