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Tag: National Book Foundation (1-9 of 9)

Iraq war veteran Phil Klay wins National Book Award

Phil Klay, an Iraq war veteran, won the National Book Award for fiction on Nov. 18 for his debut collection of short stories, Redeployment.

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On the Books: Whoopi Goldberg penning a book about the 'downsides of marriage'

- Hachette has acquired a “provocative, witty, and heartfelt book on the downsides of marriage” by the thrice-married actress and The View co-host Whoopi Goldberg, according to a press release from Tuesday. In the untitled book, set to be published in hardcover, ebook, and audio versions in September 2015, the personality “will speak openly, and with her trademark wit and wisdom about why marriage isn’t for everyone, how being alone can be satisfying, and how what’s ultimately most important is understanding who you are and what in life makes you happy.”

Goldberg is one of the few celebrities in the prestigious “EGOT” club—having won an Emmy, Golden Globe (twice), Oscar, and Tony over the course of her three-decade career. The winner of the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor is also the author of children’s Sugar Plum Ballerinas series, as well as Is It Just Me?, her humorous take on the decline of modern society.

She said in the press release: “I get to hear from a lot of different people about relationships and this got me trying to figure out why the divorce rate is SO high. It occurred to me that as one who has done it badly often, I might have some insight into why a person might not put her best foot forward in a relationship… It’s hard to really know the other person’s agenda, but if someone says ‘you complete me’…RUN!!!”

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On the Books: Authors United warns Amazon, watch your reputation

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The 1,100 member group Authors United posted a letter of direct appeal to Amazon’s board of directors—urging them to end their book-pricing standoff with publisher Hachette, which has hurt some authors’ book sales.

The letter warns the board that their reputation may be at stake: “[I]f this is how Amazon continues to treat the literary community, how long will the company’s fine reputation last?” The appeal continues, noting similar disputes “have a long and ugly history,” and asking, “Do you, personally, want to be associated with this?” For months, Amazon has delayed shipments of books by Hachette authors and removed the preorder option for those titles in an attempt to force Hachette to lower its e-book prices. [NPR] READ FULL STORY

Ursula Le Guin honored with National Book Foundation award

Every year, the National Book Foundation awards the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters to an author “who has enriched our literary heritage over a life of service, or a corpus of work.” Since the medal’s inception, authors spanning all genres have been honored, from David McCullough’s historical nonfiction to Ray Bradbury’s science fiction and everything in between.

This year, the foundation has awarded the medal to Ursula Le Guin, whose body of sci-fi and fantasy work spans dozens of novels, short stories, and poems.

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On the Books: Eleanor Catton wins Man Booker Prize; National Book Award finalists announced

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Awards dominate today’s book news, with the youngest winner of the Man Booker Prize announced Tuesday night and the National Book Award finalists revealed this morning. Below, more of today’s top headlines and must-reads: READ FULL STORY

National Book Awards unveils fiction longlist

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The National Book Foundation released today its longlist in Fiction for this year’s National Book Award. Among the authors are former National Book Award winners and finalists, a Pulitzer Prize winner and a debut novelist.

Below is the complete list: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Authors feud over Jonathan Franzen essay; Man Booker Prize goes global

Double the feuds, double the fun essays, with the Man Booker Prize and Jonathan Franzen stirring up literary controversies left and right. But even without the fighting, Thursday’s headlines include appearances by Junot Diaz and James Franco. Find out more below on today’s top books news: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: J.K. Rowling talks single parenthood; National Book Foundation unveils nonfiction longlist

J.K. Rowling pens an essay on life as a single parent, while Jeff Lindsay takes a look at what Dexter Morgan would keep on his bookshelves. In other news, which authors signed new deals? Is poetry useless? Scroll for more of today’s top books headlines below:

In a revealing piece for Gingerbread, a charity supporting single parents, J.K. Rowling writes that she’s “prouder of my years as a single mother than of any other part of my life.” [The Telegraph]

Jeff Lindsay, the mind behind Dexter, talks what a serial killer reads in an interview for Bookish. [Bookish]

The National Book Foundation continues its rollout of longlists. Today’s installment features nonfiction authors, with nine of the 10 authors receiving NBA recognition for the first time. [NBF]

Fangirl author Rainbow Rowell says parents in the Minneapolis area asked that her YA novel Eleanor & Park to be removed from library shelves. [The Toast]

Jamaican singer, actress and model Grace Jones is writing a memoir to be published by Gallery Books. “I wrote a song called ‘Art Groupie.’ First line said, ‘I’ll never write my memoirs'; that was a long time ago,” Jones says in a press release. “Since then, I thought, if I don’t do it, somebody else will.” The memoir is set to hit shelves in fall 2014.

Vikram Seth found a new publisher for his novel A Suitable Girl, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, which will publish the novel in 2016, after Seth’s deal with Penguin fell through. [New York Times]

In other deal-related news, best-selling fantasy author Terry Pratchett struck a 10-book, seven-figure one with Doubleday and Anchor Books. The first book in the series, Raising Steam, to be released in March. [New York Times]

Meanwhile, the media world’s revolving door continues to spin, as Nancy Gibbs is named the first-ever woman editor of Time magazine, succeeding Rick Stengel for the job. [TIME]

Today’s must-read essay: Noah Berlatsky tackles the question, “Is poetry useless?” [The Atlantic]

…And today’s must-read list: USA Today asked Twitter followers to share their favorite underrated female sleuths in literature. Among the winners: Lucy Pym, Flavia de Luce, Trixie Belden. [USA Today]

Lastly, check out the trailer for the latest adaptation of Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations, starring Helena Bonham-Carter as Miss Havisham. [LA Times]

On the Books: Tina Brown pens memoir; Man Booker Prize to include American writers

Shaking up the literary world today: big-name memoirs, book-award announcements and an essay by Jonathan Franzen. Read on for more book news:

The National Book Foundation announced this year’s Young People’s Literature Longlist for the National Book Award; finalists will be unveiled on October 16. [Full list at the National Book Awards website.]

In more controversial awards news, the Man Booker Prize — the most prestigious British literature honor — announced Sunday that it will consider American writers starting next year. [The Independent]

Jonathan Franzen is stirring up controversy with an essay titled “What’s Wrong with the Modern World.” In it, he targets Jeff Bezos of Amazon for the site’s self-publishing and promotion. [The Guardian] Here’s an excerpt:

In my own little corner of the world, which is to say American fiction, Jeff Bezos of Amazon may not be the antichrist, but he surely looks like one of the four horsemen. Amazon wants a world in which books are either self-published or published by Amazon itself, with readers dependent on Amazon reviews in choosing books, and with authors responsible for their own promotion. The work of yakkers and tweeters and braggers, and of people with the money to pay somebody to churn out hundreds of five-star reviews for them, will flourish in that world. But what happens to the people who became writers because yakking and tweeting and bragging felt to them like intolerably shallow forms of social engagement? What happens to the people who want to communicate in depth, individual to individual, in the quiet and permanence of the printed word, and who were shaped by their love of writers who wrote when publication still assured some kind of quality control and literary reputations were more than a matter of self-promotional decibel levels?

Speaking of “the quiet and permanence of the printed word,” we’re sure Franzen would have a lot to comment about this next item: A bookless public library opened in Texas on Saturday, offering about 10,000 free e-books and audio books. [NPR]

Moving on to book releases, recently outed Tina Brown announced Friday she’ll be writing Media Beast, a memoir “of her years at the top of the media world,” says publisher Henry Holt in a press release. The book will be published in 2016.

Joining Brown in memoir-writing is former U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates. His book, Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War will cover his time as the only defense secretary to serve under a Republican president — George W. Bush — and a Democratic one — Barack Obama. “This is a book about my more than four and a half years at war,” Gates writes in his introduction. “But this book is also about my political war with Congress each day I was in office and the dramatic contrast between my public respect, bipartisanship, and calm, and my private frustration, disgust, and anger.” The book is slated for release January 14.

Meanwhile, Ricky Martin will also be penning a book, but in this case, a picture book for children titled Santiago the Dreamer in ‘Land Among the Stars,’ about a young boy who dreams of performing on stage. “I hope this book inspires young readers to believe that dreams woven from their imaginations can become reality,” Martin says in a press release. The book, which will be simultaneously published in English and in Spanish, hits shelves on November 14.

Finally, Nicholas Sparks is launching a home decor collection. Yes, you read that right — beginning Tuesday, his “hand-picked decor collection inspired by his most memorable story plots” will be available for sale through home site Joss and Main for The Nicholas Sparks Curate for a Cause Event, with proceeds benefitting The Nicholas Sparks Foundation, according to a press release. We’re betting the collection includes some decorative tissue boxes.

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