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Tag: Mysteries (1-10 of 21)

Agatha Christie's estate authorizes new Hercule Poirot mystery

Sacrebleu!

It’s been 38 long years since eccentric detective Hercule Poirot last starred in his very own page-turner — and 37 years since Poirot’s storied creator, Agatha Christie, died under mysterious circumstances of natural causes. But that won’t stop HarperCollins imprint William Morrow from publishing a brand-new Poirot next fall — one that “will feature Hercule Poirot in a diabolically clever murder mystery sure to baffle and delight Christie’s fans, and those who have never read her work,” in the words of a press release.

Best-selling British author Sophie Hannah (The Carrier; Kind of Cruel) has stepped into Christie’s formidable shoes to pen the upcoming novel, which has been fully authorized by the Christie estate. “It is almost impossible to put into words how honored I am to have been entrusted with this amazing project — in fact, I still can’t quite believe that this is really happening! I hope to create a puzzle that will confound and frustrate the incomparable Hercule Poirot for at least a good few chapters,” she said in a statement.

The novel will be published worldwide in September 2014. In the meantime, let’s speculate about what to expect — and wonder whatever happened to Disney’s proposed Miss Marple movie, starring Jennifer Garner.

Signed copy of J.K. Rowling book could mean big money

Not many people owned a copy of The Cuckoo’s Calling before word leaked out over the weekend that author Robert Galbraith was, in fact, J.K. Rowling. But a handful who did have a signed edition.

And that could mean a lot of money.

Rowling spokeswoman Nicky Stonehill told The Associated Press on Tuesday that Rowling, the “Harry Potter” author, signed “a few copies” of her detective novel as “Robert Galbraith.” Wishing to keep her identity secret, Rowling made no promotional appearances for the book, published quietly in April, and Stonehill declined to say how any reader obtained a signed copy.

Bids for a signed first edition have topped $1,000 on eBay.

“Yes, those books will have value,” said Angel Webster of Bauman Rare Books in Manhattan. “The first edition is already a scarce commodity and she only signed a handful of them under vague circumstances.”
READ FULL STORY

If you find Dennis Lehane's lost dog, he'll name a character after you in his new book

The bad news: Novelist/screenwriter Dennis Lehane’s beloved dog has gone missing.

The good news: If you find her, the author of Mystic River and Shutter Island will name a character after you in his next book. There’s no guarantee that character will be sane and/or safe from a grisly death, though.

Lehane posted his unusual offer on Facebook Tuesday, explaining that the pooch — a black-and-tan beagle who answers to the name ‘Tessa’ — had jumped the fence at his Brookline, Mass. home 24 hours previously. “She’s smart, fast, and immeasurably sweet,” the Edgar Award winner wrote. “She doesn’t have a mean bone in her body. She’s micro-chipped, but her tags were off when she was let out into the yard.

READ FULL STORY

'Gone Girl' author Gillian Flynn talks murder, marriage, and con games

GONE-GIRL-FLYNN

With her latest novel Gone Girl, Gillian Flynn — former EW TV critic and author of previous books Sharp Objects and Dark Places — has written the book of the summer. Yesterday, Amazon named Gone Girl the best novel of 2012 so far, and last month, EW predicted it would be the novel that would make her a star. Flynn talked to me about the thought process behind her disturbing psychological thriller. (Mild spoiler alert: No big secrets revealed, but it’s best to know as little about Gone Girl as possible before reading it).

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: How did you come up with the premise for Gone Girl?
GILLIAN FLYNN: I wanted to write about marriage. In my first two books, my protagonists were single almost to the point of not having much attachment to anyone else in the world. I wanted to explore the opposite — when you willingly yoke yourself to someone for life, and what happens when it starts going wrong. I’m playing with the idea of courtship as a con game: You want this other person to like you, so you’re never going to show them your worst side until it’s too late. READ FULL STORY

Read an excerpt of James Patterson's new YA novel -- EXCLUSIVE

confessions

Best-selling author James Patterson will end his sci-fi series Maximum Ride this August, but he has a new teen-oriented series that’s just getting started. Confessions of a Murder Suspect, co-written with Maxine Paetro, comes out Sept. 24 and will stick to the mystery-thriller genre that made him famous. It centers on Tandy Angel, who comes from a wealthy but seriously shady family. When her parents are murdered, she and her siblings are the only suspects — and to clear their names, Tandy must dig into her family’s dealings. She doesn’t like what she learns.

Intrigued? Check out the first three chapters below! READ FULL STORY

By Our Staff: An excerpt from 'Green River Killer: A True Detective Story'

Ten years ago this month, my dad caught a serial killer.

From 1984 to 2001, my father, Detective Tom Jensen, hunted one of the worst mass murderers in history, Seattle’s so-called Green River Killer, responsible for the strangulation slayings of over 48 women. At first, my father was a member of a task force of detectives. Eventually, and by choice, he became the only detective working the case full-time. He privately referred to the investigation as “The Quest” – the choice of words inspired by the song “The Impossible Dream” from the musical The Man of La Mancha. “Privately,” because Dad rarely talked about the case with the family, never told us what it truly meant to him – not until it was over. In September of 2001, my father, using DNA technology, put a proper name on the Green River Killer: Gary Leon Ridgway, a seemingly mild mannered painter of commercial trucks. Ridgway was arrested in December 2001, and  my father and his colleagues believed they had brought the Green River Killer to justice and brought an end to a nightmare that haunted Seattle for nearly 20 years. But a bizarre endgame still awaited them.

In 2008, I asked my father if I could dramatize his story in a slightly unusual fashion. I love comic books. My father, in fact, introduced me to comics when I was kid. So I wanted to write a graphic novel. The result is called Green River Killer: A True Detective Story, published by Dark Horse Comics. READ FULL STORY

Dress made of crime novel covers hits the runway -- you be the judge!

Photo credit: Chip Miller

This looks like the result of an “unconventional” Project Runway challenge. Hard Case Crime is known for publishing pulpy novels with scantily clad or naked women on the covers. This summer, its books inspired an unusual combination of reading and public nudity. So it’s a little ironic that designer Hally McGehean used hundreds of Hard Case jacket designs to cover a woman up (albeit barely).

So Shelf Lifers, use your critical reading skills to fashion-police this unusual garment: best-seller or crime against fashion? What do you think of the weird girdle-type thing around the waist (clearly I’m not used to writing about style)? READ FULL STORY

'L.A. Noire' videogame inspires a crime fiction anthology featuring Joyce Carol Oates, Andrew Vachss, and more. PLUS: Read an exclusive excerpt

LA-noire-shortstories
Last year, Rockstar Games released the western saga Red Dead Redemption, a flat-out videogame masterpiece by bringing to life a particular time and place in American history with extraordinary detail and telling a rich, engrossing story that challenged the mind and engaged the emotions. Hopes are high among fans and critical admirers of Rockstar’s sophisticated, decidedly adult work that their next major title will prove equal to its Red Dead triumph: L.A. Noire, a murder-mystery adventure set in late '40s Los Angeles, a sprawling and stylish videogame iteration of the film noir and neo noir genres, typified by movies like
The Big Sleep (1946) and Chinatown (1974). Of course, vintage film noir owed a debt to crime fiction by the likes of Raymond Chandler (who wrote The Big Sleep) and Dashiell Hammett. To acknowledge the literary roots of its newest offering – and to expand L.A. Noire into a larger "transmedia" entertainment franchise – Rockstar commissioned several prominent authors to pen short stories inspired by the game and stand on their own as crime genre fun. An eBook compilation from Mulholland Books, entitled L.A. Noire: The Collected Stories, will be available June 6, about three weeks after the game’s scheduled May 17 release. "The concept behind L.A. Noire was to create a crime thriller that built on the classic tradition of noir, not just in film but also evoking the great body of crime fiction that exists within the genre," says Alex Moulle-Berteaux, Rockstar's VP of Marketing. "Chandler, [James] Ellroy, and Hammet were as much touchstones for the atmosphere and characters of the game as anything from cinema, so there was something appealing about [the]

idea of setting some of the genre’s finest contemporary writers loose within that world.”

Among the authors who’ve written original stories for the anthology: READ FULL STORY

Can't get enough of AMC's 'The Killing'? You'll love these books

AMC’s excellent new mystery series The Killing is set in the Pacific Northwest, but it’s based on a Danish show and the scenery, atmosphere, and quiet vibe are all pure Nordic noir. So if you’ve found yourself sucked in and are eager for more chilly Scandinavian-style suspense, here’s a recommendation: Swedish crime novelist Henning Mankell, whose new (and final) Kurt Wallander mystery, The Troubled Man, recently hit bookstores.

Mankell has been beaten by French police and arrested by Israeli commandos. He’s worked on a Swedish merchant ship, at a Paris musical-instrument shop, and as the artistic director of an African theater company. He spent years living in the middle of a long, bloody civil war in Mozambique. And he’s managed to find time to write some 40 books, which are available in 41 languages and have sold almost 40 million copies around the world. “I have been accused of many things in my life,” he says in a feature in this week’s Entertainment Weekly. “But never of being lazy.”

Mankell is best known for his 11 books featuring Wallander, an overweight, middle-aged, diabetic police inspector who fights bad guys and personal demons in a small town at the desolate southern tip of Sweden. Fans of The Killing will love the Wallander books’ precise procedural detail, thoughtful pace, and well-drawn characters. So if you find yourself getting antsy while waiting a whole week to find out what happens next on the show, pick up one of Mankell’s books (they’re all good, but start with the first one, Faceless Killers). And be sure to check out our story on Mankell in the latest issue, on newsstands now.

James Bond and Sherlock Holmes both have new novels coming soon. Which Brit-lit hero are you more excited for?

Quantum-of-SolaceImage Credit: Susie AllnuttSir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes solved crimes in Victorian London. Ian Fleming’s James Bond fought villains across the globe during the Cold War. Both iconic Brit heroes appear to have a never-ending hold on the world’s population: The 007 movies have been a box office force for half a century, while the detective from Baker Street has recently inspired a new movie franchise and a thrilling new TV series. Now, both heroes will return to their original medium: READ FULL STORY

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