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Tag: Lena Dunham (1-10 of 13)

What We're Reading Now: 'Not That Kind of Girl' by Lena Dunham

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Another week, another handful of days spent pacing the halls and circling the conference rooms asking everyone if they were finished with their copy of Lena Dunham’s Not That Kind of Girl. They all said variations of “no” and “stop asking” until Matt finally asked me a question I wasn’t really ready for: “Why don’t you go buy it at the store?”

No good answer there, so I went and picked one up.

Then, rather than tear into it, I just stared at it for days. I’d go over, grab it, sit down, read the dedication and then pull up Lena on Instagram, which would lead to scrolling through Jack Antonoff’s life, which would somehow result in being on Kendall Jenner’s page, and then it’d be time for bed. Or, I’d go over, read the quotes on the back cover and turn on HBOGo (and not watch Girls, which I had never actually seen prior to this week). READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Amazon reportedly opening its first brick-and-mortar store

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- Amazon is coming to Midtown. The The Wall Street Journal reports that the online giant is set to open its first brick-and-mortar store at 7 W. 34th St. in Manhattan, directly across the street from the Empire State Building. Herald Square, Madison Square Garden, Penn Station—major hubs for locals and tourists alike—are all a block or two away from the retailer-savvy location. In addition to the nearby stores (like the Macy’s flagship location, Forever 21, and H&M)—as well as a smartly timed opening just in time for the holiday shopping season—Amazon’s first serious venture into face-to-face consumer interaction is poised to bring in a lot of foot traffic. (They experimented with a popup Kindle shop in San Francisco last year.) In August, a peak number of about 6,000 people per hour passed in front of the H&M on the same block. Amazon has declined to comment on the story. [The Wall Street Journal]

- Girls actress and creator Lena Dunham is the kind of girl to top bestsellers lists with her debut book. Dunham’s collection of personal essays, is currently second on The New York Times bestsellers list for nonfiction, print and ebook sales combined—and No. 1 on the ebook-only nonfiction list. The book sold about 38,000 hardcovers in the week following its release on Sept. 30, according to Nielsen Bookscan (whose data covers approximately 85 percent of all book sales). READ FULL STORY

After criticism, Lena Dunham will pay opening acts on her book tour

After the New York Times reported that the warm-up acts on Lena Dunham’s book tour would perform for free and Gawker took aim, Dunham announced on Twitter that she would indeed be paying those performers.  READ FULL STORY

Lena Dunham's here to give you advice (and persuade you to buy her book)

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In anticipation of the release of her upcoming book, Lena Dunham is doling out advice in a series of YouTube videos, which feature an Eloise-esque backdrop and cameos from her dog, Lamby. Dunham’s book, Not That Kind of Girl, is a collection of personal essays presented as something of an advice book—as Michiko Kakutani writes in her positive New York Times review it’s “a kind of memoir disguised as an advice book, or a how-to-book (as in how to navigate the perilous waters of girlhood) in the guise of a series of personal essays”—hence the videos fit the theme.  READ FULL STORY

'The New Yorker' premieres excerpt from Lena Dunham's upcoming book

In the second season of HBO show Girls, Lena Dunham’s Hannah Horvath struggles with OCD. She counts everything, she forces herself to picture sexual images in a loop, she can only do certain things in sets of eight. And in a new excerpt from her coming book Not That Kind of Girl, Dunham reveals that her character’s struggles were very similar to her own. READ FULL STORY

Lena Dunham's book tour features spectacular roster of guests

The hype for Lena Dunham’s first book Not That Kind of Girl might be even louder than we expected — this will be the bookstore equivalent of a Beyonce and Jay-Z stadium concert tour. Dunham announced the dates for Not That Kind of Tour today, and the lineup of special guests is absurdly amazing. Certain stops will feature local talent (you can apply to an open call on Dunham’s website), but others will feature well-known women, including fellow Apatow collaborator Amy Schumer, poet and memoirist Mary Karr, Portlandia star Carrie Brownstein, filmmaker Miranda July, and novelist Zadie Smith.

See below for a full list of stops for Not That Kind of Tour: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Lena Dunham discovers Alice Munro

Lena Dunham wrote an essay about discovering Alice Munro for Zoetrope, the literary journal run by Francis Ford Coppola. “I came to Alice Munro after her Nobel Prize win, like a girl discovering Maroon 5 circa 2014 and deciding they are an indie band,” she wrote. “Because, new as I am to her, and sure as we all are that she is the queen of her form, I still feel that Alice Munro is mine. I am the perfect audience for her brand of quiet, seething feminism.” The essay is titled “Hateship, Loveship, Viewership, Readership,” riffing on the title of the Munro’s classic story “Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage,” which is reprinted in the magazine. [Zoetrope All-Story]

Barnes and Noble is splitting its retail and Nook operations into two separate companies. Though there’s no guarantee that the split will be successful, the company hopes to complete the process by the first quarter of 2015. As it is, Barnes & Noble isn’t doing to0 well—retail sales are down 6 percent this year, Nook hardware sales are down 45 percent, and digital content sales are down 21 percent. Earlier this year, Barnes & Noble announced that it would invest fewer of the company’s own resources into the Nook division and would instead partner with Samsung to develop a tablet. Hopefully, one of the companies will be called “Barnes” and the other “Noble.” [Publishers Weekly] READ FULL STORY

On The Books: BookExpo to feature Neil Patrick Harris, Lena Dunham, Amy Poehler

The annual publishing convention BookExpo America began Wednesday at New York City’s Javits Convention Center. The four-day-long event will feature appearances from Neil Patrick Harris, Lena Dunham, and Amy Poehler, all of whom are promoting their forthcoming memoirs: Neil Patrick Harris: Choose Your Own Autobiography (Oct. 14), Dunham’s Not That Kind of Girl (Oct. 7), and Poehler’s Yes Please (Oct. 28); other events include previews and discussions of film adaptations. EW’s YA expert Sara Vilokmerson is moderating The Fault in Our Stars event with author John Green and director Josh Boone, and EW’s Anthony Breznican  is moderating the This Is Where I Leave You panel with author Jonathan Tropper and actors Tina Fey and Jason Bateman. In addition to these star-studded events, the first-ever BookCon, modeled on ComicCon, will take place on the final day of BookExpo – organizers expect as many as 10,000 readers to attend. We can expect that the ongoing battle between Amazon and Hachette books will be a topic of discussion during BookExpo. [USA Today] READ FULL STORY

Lena Dunham interviews Judy Blume, 'Believer' to publish conversation in book -- EXCERPT

Lena Dunham and Judy Blume may seem like unlikely gal pals, but both have spoken in the past about their admiration for each other’s work: Dunham grew up with Blume’s novels (and even used Summer Sisters as an inspiration for her HBO show Girls), while Blume is a vocal fan of Dunham’s show.

Naturally, the duo had to meet each other and have a chat stat — and The Believer has made it happen. The magazine brought the two together for their first meeting, during which they discussed everything from the books they read as children, Blume’s tendency to make up books for book reports, and, of all things, horses.

Here’s an excerpt of their conversation, which will be published in full by Believer in a limited edition, 80-page book:

LENA DUNHAM: As a kid, what was popular? What were the books people read at school? Was it the Bobbsey Twins and Boxcar Children?
JUDY BLUME:
I never read the Bobbsey Twins or Boxcar Children, but—

Both boring.
My first favorite books were the ones in the Betsy-Tacy series. But they weren’t popular in school. I didn’t know anyone else who was reading them. I liked Nancy Drew, used my allowance to buy one every week at the Ritz Bookstore. In sixth grade I made up books to give book reports on.

You invented them?
I did.

You would report on a book that had never existed?
I did.

Were you ever caught?
Nope. I always got an A on those.

That’s incredible.
I just wasn’t interested in the kinds of books I thought I was meant to be reading. I wasn’t that interested in stories about prairie girls or horse stories. I never read a horse book in my life, but I thought that’s what my friends were reading and that’s what I should be reading—Dobbin does this and Dobbin does that.

That was the name of your series?
It was about a horse named Dobbin, yes. I made up the characters and the theme and I stood up in front of the class and I gave my report.

On the books you made up in your mind?
Yes.

That’s a literary hoax, basically.
I had never heard of a literary hoax then. Still, I knew it wasn’t right. The thing is, I was reading. I was reading from the bookshelves at home, but how could I report on those books? I tell teachers now, when I tell this story, I say, “How about just once during the school year, give your students the chance to invent books? See what they come up with.”

Did you ever say in the book report that you didn’t like it—that it wasn’t good?
I don’t think so.

That would be a whole other meta-layer.

The book, Judy Blume and Lena Dunham in Conversation, will be available for purchase by Believer subscribers only.

Lena Dunham's $3.7M book proposal leaks online

Lena Dunham, creator of the HBO show Girls and overachiever about town, can barely do anything these days without an onslaught of criticism and snark from pretty much everywhere. A few days ago she made an offhand comment about how writing for money was “weird” at the Glamour Women of the Year Awards. It didn’t go over well.

Today, Gawker got a hold of her 66-page, illustrated book proposal that landed her that now-infamous $3.7 million deal with Random House back in October.

READ FULL STORY

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