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Tag: Kindle (1-4 of 4)

On the Books: Publishing industry lacks diversity, female executives

An annual Publishers Weekly survey of industry employees found that 89 percent of respondents identified as white/caucasian, while 61 percent believe that there is little diversity in publishing. The study found that respondents recognize the direct impact of this racial discrepancy on the industry, agreeing that “[t]he dearth of minority employees directly affects the types of books that are published,” and that to resolve the issue, “there need to be more advocates for books involving people of color throughout the business.”

The survey also re-confirmed the perennial pay gap between men and women in publishing houses, a staggering $25,000 difference— even though women comprise 74 percent of the workforce. Part of this gap is due to unequal pay for similar titles, while part is explained by men’s dominance in higher-salaried management and executive positions. READ FULL STORY

Amazon appears to be testing unlimited ebook subscription service

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On Wednesday, a webpage for Kindle Unlimited—a subscription service where users can “enjoy unlimited access to over 600,000 titles and thousands of audiobooks on any device for just $9.99 a month,” according to the page—went live and then was quickly made unavailable. Google cache is hosting a copy of the webpage, however, and Gigaom posted a copy of what they claim is Kindle Unlimited’s advertisement video on YouTube.

Amazon has not yet officially announced Kindle Unlimited, and Amazon did not immediately reply to EW‘s request for comment, so many details are still unclear—but the webpage’s existence suggests Amazon may have an unlimited ebook subscription service on the way.

The service would rival Scribd and Oyster, two other ebook subscription companies. Oyster boasts more than 500,000 titles at $9.95 per month, while Scribd advertises over 400,000 titles for $8.99 per month. These services function like Netflix for ebooks, where subscribers can access an unlimited amount of ebooks from the website’s limited offerings at a flat monthly rate. Just as Netflix was a game-changer in the movies and television industries, Scribd and Oyster have been making waves in publishing—so it’s not surprising to note that Amazon has expressed interest.

Many of the books Amazon appeared to be offering before the Kindle Unlimited webpage was taken down were titles from their own publishing imprint, according to Gigaom. However, none of the titles featured in Gigaom’s video or on the website were from the five biggest publishers—HarperCollins, Simon & Schuster, Penguin Random House, Macmillan, or, of course, Hachette. The webpage, however, has titles from some of the bigger independent houses, like the Harry Potter books from Bloomsbury. HarperCollins and Simon & Schuster are both on board with Oyster and Scribd. It appears Kindle Unlimited could also, like both other active services, offer self-published work.

Amazon already offers a sort of book subscription service for Amazon Prime members, the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library. Through that, Prime users can borrow one book per month from a selection of more than 600,000 books for no additional cost. Kindle Unlimited appears to be a separate service that won’t be included with Amazon Prime, which costs $99 per year.

On the Books: Indie bookstores reject Amazon Kindle exchange program

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Amazon’s latest effort to push Kindles through indie bookstores has not been well-received. Meanwhile, NaNoWriMo is in full swing, with a new take by grammar site Grammarly. Read on for more of today’s top books headlines: READ FULL STORY

Amazon announces Kindle Matchbook, service offering cheap digital versions of purchased print books

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For readers looking to expand their digital libraries, but are wary of paying full price for titles they already own, Amazon today unveiled a solution: the Kindle Matchbook. Through the program, Amazon users can buy discounted versions of print books they had purchased new from the site.

Depending on the title, electronic copies on Kindle Matchbook will cost $2.99 or less (some are even free). The option works for all print purchases dating back to 1995–when Amazon first opened its online bookstore — and offers users the option to review their order history.

“If you logged onto your CompuServe account during the Clinton administration and bought a book like Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus from Amazon, Kindle Matchbook now makes it possible for that purchase–18 years later–to be added to your Kindle library at a very low cost,” Russ Grandinetti, vice president of Kindle Content, said in a press release. “In addition to being a great new benefit for customers, this is an easy choice for publishers and authors who will now be able to earn more from each book they publish.” READ FULL STORY

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