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Tag: Katniss Everdeen (1-10 of 11)

Katniss wears the crown: 'Hunger Games' supplants 'Harry Potter' as best selling-series on Amazon

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Move on over, Harry.  It’s Katniss’s turn to wear the crown.

In a statement released today, Amazon.com announced  that  The Hunger Games trilogy has supplanted Harry Potter as the best-selling series of all time on the website.

“Since debuting in 2008, Katniss Everdeen and the Hunger Games have taken the world by storm, much as Harry Potter did a decade before,” Sara Nelson, the editorial director of books and Kindle at Amazon, said.

In what is yet another testament to the immense popularity of Suzanne Collins’ post-apocalyptic novels, the three-part Hunger Games saga overtook the seven-book Harry Potter series in just four years.

The figures take both print and Kindle book sales into account.

Does this news have you itching for some Katniss? No need to fret, ‘The Hunger Games’ Blu-ray/DVD hits stores tomorrow.

Updated figures for 'The Hunger Games' books: More than 36.5M in print in the U.S. alone

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In explaining the phenomenon fueling The Hunger Games film’s massive $155 million opening, many box office prognosticators referred to the 24 million copies of Suzanne Collins’ trilogy printed in the U.S. alone. But now it seems we’ve all been aiming our arrows far too low. Scholastic released updated figures today, and it looks like there are more than 36.5 million copies of Katniss Everdeen’s saga available domestically. Publishers are notoriously cagey about releasing sales data, but when the numbers are this robust, there’s reason to brag. Here’s the breakdown by book: READ FULL STORY

'The World of the Hunger Games' movie tie-in book: A first look!

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The Gamemakers at Scholastic have been generous to fans hungry for more books about the movies. On Feb. 7, we got The Hunger Games: Movie Tie-in Edition, The Hunger Games: Official Illustrated Movie Companion, and The Hunger Games Tribute Guide.

Now, just in time for the movie, The World of the Hunger Games, the fourth and final tie-in book — at least until the Catching Fire movie comes out — has arrived today on a silver parachute. While the squeal-worthy Official Illustrated Movie Companion offered an incredible behind-the-scenes look at the real-life production of the film, World is an in-depth look at the fictional world of Panem — think of it as your Panem tour guide. (No, there’s still no official map!) READ FULL STORY

'Hunger Games': A great map of Panem -- PHOTO

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As a Bilbo Baggins fan can tell you, a detailed map can greatly enhance the enjoyment of reading a novel that takes place in another world. The Hunger Games takes place in Panem, a North America that has been ravaged by war and geological catastrophes. Suzanne Collins has never given readers an official map of Panem, although fans have generated plenty of their own ideas of what Katniss’ world should look like. I’ve perused a lot of the maps out there — and seriously, we could make a Panem World Atlas out of all the amazing fan-generated work — and this one, created by Livejournalers aimmyarrowshigh and badguys is perhaps the best one I’ve seen. It’s both creative and meticulously justified based on Collins’ text. Before you see Panem in living color tomorrow, does this rendering match your vision of District placement? Check out a larger version of the map below: READ FULL STORY

'Hunger Games' author Suzanne Collins wrote for 'Clarissa' -- what do Clarissa and Katniss have in common?

One’s a starving, militant rebel living in a post-apocalyptic world. The other is a fashion-forward teen thriving on a bright Orlando soundstage. What do they have in common? One clearly versatile writer: Suzanne Collins.

Ever since reading The Hunger Games, I’ve been intrigued by the fact that the same woman who wrote such a gritty, violent series also wrote for the fizzy, neon-colored sitcom Clarissa Explains It All (and also for The Mystery Files of Shelby Woo, which I think is sort of underrated). Collins didn’t create Clarissa, but I’m sure she lived and breathed Clarissa while she worked for the show, just as she lived and breathed Katniss while writing the novels. We’ll learn about Collins’ journey from Clarissa to Katniss in the upcoming comic book about the author’s life, but for now, it’s fascinating to see ways in which the 90’s Nickelodeon heroine could have inspired the very different teen who made Collins famous. Okay, all of this is a huge stretch, and it’s easier to think of ways they almost-might-be similar but are completely different, but here goes: READ FULL STORY

Fan-made 'Hunger Games' clip gives a taste of what might be

Tired of waiting for news on The Hunger Games movie? Anxious for a glimpse of Katniss in costume? Some people might tell you that patience is a virtue, but luckily the fans and aspiring actors behind this homemade, and surprisingly well done, mini-adaptation don’t believe that. Take a look below, but be forewarned: It’s the scene between Katniss and Rue and, even out of context, it packs an emotional wallop right to the most wallop-vulnerable part of your heart.

Sure, the actress playing Rue is fair-skinned and blond, but, other than that, I thought it was pretty impressive. What do you guys think?

'The Hunger Games': Jodelle Ferland dresses as Katniss for Halloween

jodellemicah/Twitpic.com

Jodelle Ferland had a tiny part in The Twilight Saga: Eclipse as Bree Tanner, but for her Halloween costume, she set her sights on a lead role. The actress tweeted a few images of herself dressed up as Katniss Everdeen, complete with a Mockingjay pin, a bow and arrow, and the District 12 tribute’s iconic braid. Was this a stealth audition for the upcoming movie? Ferland insisted that she’s just a Games fanatic, tweeting, “I thought Katniss would be a really fun costume. Don’t take it so seriously…I’m not trying to say, ‘Hey, look at me. I should be Katniss.’ It’s not a competition.”

True, it’s not a competition. But with rumors circulating about other actresses receiving the Hunger Games script, this is an intriguing new development. I was operating under the mistaken impression that Ferland was roughly 10 years old, but she’s actually 16…the same age as Katniss in the first book. What do you think, Shelf Lifers? Should Ferland’s name be thrown into the running for Katniss? Or do you think she looks too young for the part? Shouldn’t she at least get points for dressing as Katniss two years before everybody else does?

Why 'The Hunger Games' isn't the new 'Twilight'

It’s Twilight all over again.

How many times have I heard that in the two years since The Hunger Games came out? Too many too count. And I have to say, it continues to baffle me: These novels could not be more different. Stephenie Meyer’s is more of a traditional romance (populated, I grant you, by some pretty untraditional characters); while Suzanne Collins’ is a tale of war and survival.

Is it that both books star unforgettable women? I suppose you could say that in the most sweeping and general sense, Katniss Everdeen and Bella Swan are alike: Both have cores of steel. They know what they want, and they aren’t going to back down. But for me, any similarity ends there.

Forged by famine, disease, and unbelievable hardship, Katniss, 16, regularly slips beneath the electrified barbed wire fence to hunt and forage for her her family–a crime punishable by death. She’s not interested in romance. She’s not big on forgiveness (even when it comes to her own mother). And when her younger sister, Primrose, is selected by lottery to participate in the barbaric murder ritual called The Hunger Games, Katniss steps in and takes her place. Bella, on the other hand, has known sadness but not poverty or want.  Arriving in Forks to live with her dad, knowing no one, she’s the shy girl, the outcast, who’s suddenly plucked from obscurity by the ravishingly handsome Edward Cullen. Hers is the stuff of classic fairy tales; she’s a princess who must be rescued, time and time again, by her one of her two prince charmings, either the vampire or the werewolf. Frankly, compared to Katniss, Bella is simply the more passive character: For the most part, things happen to her. Katniss, on the other hand, copes with disaster by strategizing–and bulldozing–her way through the situation. Does she ever need to be rescued? Absolutely. But  she also rescues Peeta–a real or feigned love interest?–more than once along the way.

That brings me to the love triangle issue. Could it be that people compare the two books because their heroines must choose between two men? Again, I don’t find this valid. Bella, it seems to me, never wavers in her love for Edward, despite Jacob’s devotion. In contrast,  I’m left with the feeling that Katniss may very well not know what love is at all. She may have been too badly damaged by war, by deprivation, by emotional and physical torture to ever be able to love fully and normally. Whatever she feels for Peeta or for Gale, it isn’t the headlong devotion Bella has for Edward.  More importantly, the question of whom Katniss will end up with isn’t what drives the narrative.  In other words, the question isn’t, Which one will she marry? The question is, Will she live until the end of the book?

So weigh in, Shelf Lifers. Do you think Twilight and The Hunger Games tread the same territory?

EW Shelf Life Book Club: 'Mockingjay'

Like many of you, I’ve finished Mockingjay–tearing through it at top speed, just as I did The Hunger Games and Catching Fire. And I have to say that although I loved it, and thought it brought the whole trilogy to a perfect end, I know not everyone does. That’s what this book club will be about–not so much reviewing a particular book, but hashing it out, talking about things we liked and didn’t like, speculating on what an author really meant by a certain plot twist or development. I’m curious to know what all of you think.

So, with that in mind, here’s where I’m at, a few days after finishing Mockingjay. (Anyone who hasn’t finished the book, STOP HERE! There are SPOILERS below.)

There’s a lot out there in the media about the violence and brutality of the book. Sheryl Cotleur, who works for a California bookstore, wrote in an op-ed piece, “It seems to me [the books] go beyond the usual mayhem….Now we have not only children killing children, we have electrocution, drowning, burning, stabbing, being injected by virulent venom and more torture than I can recall in any young adult novel I’ve ever read.” For her part, Collins told Library Journal recently, “One of the reasons it’s important for me to write about war is I really think that the concept of war, the specifics of war, the nature of war, the ethical ambiguities of war are introduced too late to children. I think they can hear them, understand them, know about them, at a much younger age without being scared to death by the stories. It’s not comfortable for us to talk about, so we generally don’t talk about these issues with our kids. But I feel that if the whole concept of war were introduced to kids at an earlier age, we would have better dialogues going on about it, and we would have a fuller understanding.” She also says that she hopes readers will come away from the books with “questions about how elements of the books might be relevant in their own lives. And, if they’re disturbing, what they might do about them.” For my part, I think that yes, the brutality is graphic–it occasionally made me flinch–but I also think Collins would not have been able to make her point about the futility of war unless she described it honestly. And real war isn’t  guts and glory. It’s unspeakably horrible. People (often people you love) go out and kill other people.

So: your thoughts on the violence? Too much for the book? Were you ever bothered by Katniss’ ability to kill ruthlessly? How did you feel about the combat scenes?

I’m reading a lot–mostly on various blogs–about the outcome of the Katniss/Peeta/Gale love triangle. Some readers seem incredibly disappointed that Katniss ended up with Peeta, not Gale, and they think the book ended with a whimper. When I first read it, I thought it was a little flat. But it’s grown on me. For one thing, it’s realistic. In war, even the “winners” don’t really win; they’ve sacrificed so much and seen so much and lost so much. Both Katniss and Peeta are injured (both physically and emotionally) and worn down. In retrospect, Katniss’ quiet resignation in the final pages seems fitting to me. But let’s hear it: Who thought she should have ended up with Gale? Why? What did you all think of the ending itself?

Finally, taking the trilogy as a whole, I’m left not just with Collins’ powerful anti-war message but with an indelible image of Katniss in my head. I honestly think she’s a fictional character for the ages, that these books are going to be around for a long, long, time. You?

Cast your vote: Who should play Katniss (and Peeta, Gale, Haymitch, and Effie) in 'The Hunger Games'?

ronan-lovato-dobrev-watsonImage Credit: Albert L. Ortega/PR Photos; David Gabber/PR PhotosWhen we asked last week who’d make the perfect Katniss, we got inundated with responses. What’s more, lots of you cast the rest of the books as well. As for myself, I’m still dithering over Katniss since it’s the most critical role (and the one that would be easiest to screw up–get Katniss wrong and none of the movies will work). In my mind’s eye she’s like a young Lisbeth Salander, wiry, dark, and fierce.  Maybe Saoirse Ronan with dark hair? I’m less conflicted when it comes to Peeta (Lucas Till) and Gale (Drew Roy). But I have no idea how to choose among the actors suggested for Haymitch and Effie. In their own way, each one seems pitch-perfect.

So, Hunger Games fans, cast your votes! We’ll put up our results later in the week.

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