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Tag: Judy Blume (1-10 of 10)

New Judy Blume novel announced for 2015

Are You There, God? It’s all of us, thankful for another Judy Blume book.

A new Blume novel (for adults) will be released next year, EW has confirmed. Plot details about the book are scarce, but Carole Baron, Blume’s editor, told The New York Times: “It’s pure Judy Blume, writing about family and about friendships, about love, about betrayal. It’s quintessential Judy.”

This 2015 release will mark Blume’s first novel for adults since 1998′s Summer Sisters.

See new cover for Judy Blume's 'Then Again, Maybe I Won't' -- EXCLUSIVE

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Simon & Schuster are bringing Judy Blume to a whole new generation by repackaging some of the beloved author’s best-known novels. EW already revealed the other updated looks—check them out here and here. Today we’ve got a peek at the new cover for Then Again, Maybe I Won’t (above), featuring the tagline “Why can’t things stay the same?” What do you think of the, Shelf Lifers? These editions will be available beginning April 29.

See new covers for Judy Blume's 'Tiger Eyes' and 'Deenie' -- EXCLUSIVE

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Everyone from Lena Dunham to Mindy Kaling and Chelsea Handler have declared their love for Judy Blume, and now Simon & Schuster is bringing some of her classics to another generation of young readers. Two months ago we revealed updated editions of Forever and Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret, and now we have a sneak peek at Tiger Eyes and Deenie. (Available Apr. 29). Check them out below! READ FULL STORY

Lena Dunham interviews Judy Blume, 'Believer' to publish conversation in book -- EXCERPT

Lena Dunham and Judy Blume may seem like unlikely gal pals, but both have spoken in the past about their admiration for each other’s work: Dunham grew up with Blume’s novels (and even used Summer Sisters as an inspiration for her HBO show Girls), while Blume is a vocal fan of Dunham’s show.

Naturally, the duo had to meet each other and have a chat stat — and The Believer has made it happen. The magazine brought the two together for their first meeting, during which they discussed everything from the books they read as children, Blume’s tendency to make up books for book reports, and, of all things, horses.

Here’s an excerpt of their conversation, which will be published in full by Believer in a limited edition, 80-page book:

LENA DUNHAM: As a kid, what was popular? What were the books people read at school? Was it the Bobbsey Twins and Boxcar Children?
JUDY BLUME:
I never read the Bobbsey Twins or Boxcar Children, but—

Both boring.
My first favorite books were the ones in the Betsy-Tacy series. But they weren’t popular in school. I didn’t know anyone else who was reading them. I liked Nancy Drew, used my allowance to buy one every week at the Ritz Bookstore. In sixth grade I made up books to give book reports on.

You invented them?
I did.

You would report on a book that had never existed?
I did.

Were you ever caught?
Nope. I always got an A on those.

That’s incredible.
I just wasn’t interested in the kinds of books I thought I was meant to be reading. I wasn’t that interested in stories about prairie girls or horse stories. I never read a horse book in my life, but I thought that’s what my friends were reading and that’s what I should be reading—Dobbin does this and Dobbin does that.

That was the name of your series?
It was about a horse named Dobbin, yes. I made up the characters and the theme and I stood up in front of the class and I gave my report.

On the books you made up in your mind?
Yes.

That’s a literary hoax, basically.
I had never heard of a literary hoax then. Still, I knew it wasn’t right. The thing is, I was reading. I was reading from the bookshelves at home, but how could I report on those books? I tell teachers now, when I tell this story, I say, “How about just once during the school year, give your students the chance to invent books? See what they come up with.”

Did you ever say in the book report that you didn’t like it—that it wasn’t good?
I don’t think so.

That would be a whole other meta-layer.

The book, Judy Blume and Lena Dunham in Conversation, will be available for purchase by Believer subscribers only.

See new covers for Judy Blume's 'Forever' and 'Margaret' -- EXCLUSIVE

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Judy Blume is just as relevant today as she was two decades ago, so it makes sense that Simon & Schuster is re-packaging some of her best-known titles for today’s YA set. Now a whole new generation can hide Forever from their parents. See the updated covers of Forever and Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret. below: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Maya Angelou, Judy Blume sign open letter to Obama on standardized testing; Emily Dickinson manuscripts digitally archived

Today’s bevy of book news includes an open letter, another digital archive, and a retirement that’s up in the air. Read on for more top headlines: READ FULL STORY

Amy Poehler just wants Judy Blume to read to her

If you already love Amy Poehler, there might be room to love her even more. Just listen to the Parks and Recreation star singing the praises of the one-and-only Judy Blume:

“I am excited to see Judy Blume’s new movie, because she is a very special lady, and more movies should be produced with her name,” Poehler told Vulture about the film adaptation of Blume’s 1981 novel Tiger Eyes, out in limited release now. “Or she should just sit and read her books aloud and we should just gather at her feet.”

But every kid of Poehler’s generation loves Judy Blume, right? That might be true (let’s be honest, it is), but Poehler took her Judy IQ a step further when one of her PR reps suggested that the Ramona series belonged to Blume.
READ FULL STORY

Here's to you, Judy Blume: A toast to 'Tiger Eyes' and 'regular kid' lit

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Davey Wexler is not a witch. She’s not a skilled huntress, fighting for her life as a rapacious crowd watches her every move. She’s not even a clumsy, moody wallflower inadvertently drawn into a sexy world of immortal bloodsuckers.

Instead, Davey’s just, well… Davey, an average 15-year-old dealing with average teenage problems: the sudden death of a loved one, a big move to a new town and a new school, a best friend who drinks just a little too much. Nothing about her life is sensationalized, not even the bloody holdup that abruptly robs her of her father — which is probably why Davey resonated so deeply with me when I first met her in the late ’90s. (Her cool, androgynous name and relationship with a mysterious dude named Wolf didn’t hurt, either.)

And when Davey re-entered my life a few weeks ago — via Lawrence and Judy Blume’s new film adaptation of Tiger Eyes — I realized something else about her essential ordinariness: In a modern YA landscape glutted with fantastical dystopias, supernatural romances, brand-name-soaked glamoramas, and hyperbolic tragedy, what makes this heroine remarkable is the fact that she’s not very remarkable at all.

READ FULL STORY

Are you there Hollywood? It's me, Judy Blume

On the island of Key West, Fla., the tourists—in every shade of sunburn—line up to visit the Ernest Hemingway Home & Museum. But just a few blocks away from the shrine to Papa is the home of a writer who, for a large portion of the population, anyway, is the literary equivalent of a fairy godmother. Judy Blume, at 75, has guided countless kids through the terrors of adolescence with her books—including 1970’s Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret; 1972’s Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing; 1973’s Deenie; and 1975’s Forever—which have sold more than 82 million copies worldwide. READ FULL STORY

Judy Blume undergoes mastectomy for breast cancer

Young adult novelist Judy Blume has been privately struggling with breast cancer since June.

Doctors for the 74-year-old author, known for such titles as “Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret” and “Blubber,” discovered early stages of invasive ductal carcinoma during a routine ultrasound of dense breast tissue. Last month she underwent a mastectomy with reconstruction.

“Caught it just in time,” she wrote this morning on her blog. “No other treatment necessary.”

Invasive ductal carcinoma is the most common form of breast cancer, affecting 80% of those diagnosed. It is generally treated with a mastectomy, or with a lumpectomy and radiation. Blume opted for the former due to her age and physical shape. According to her blog, the surgery went smoothly and was relatively painless.

“Now it’s one month post surgery,” she wrote.  “I’m still in NY and feeling stronger every day.”

Read More:
Great Books for Kids 10-12
First Look at Judy Blume’s ‘Tiger Eyes’ movie — EXCLUSIVE
Judy Blume: A Classic Hits the Big Screen at Last

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