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Tag: John Green (1-8 of 8)

John Green to talk 'The Fault in Our Stars' at BookCon panel -- EXCLUSIVE

People of Nerdfighteria: You’re gonna want to read this.

EW can reveal exclusively that YA rock star John Green has been tapped to headline a panel at BookCon — which is sort of like Comic-Con, but for, you know, actual books — all about The Fault in Our Stars‘s journey from page to screen. The panel, scheduled for May 31, will also feature TFIOS‘s film team, including Fox 2000 Pictures president Elizabeth Gabler, director Josh Boone, producer Wyck Godfrey, and screenwriters Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber. EW’s own YA expert Sara Vilkomerson will moderate the event — which will also feature a sneak peek at footage from the upcoming film adaptation of TFIOS, which opens June 6.

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John Green's top 10 underrated books

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John Green, author of tearjerker The Fault in Our Stars, gave us his top 10 picks for favorite underrated books. See what the writer chose below:
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New Hollywood: John Green talks 'Fault in Our Stars' movie and his meeting with Obama

Including John Green in our New Hollywood issue was a no-brainer. Although a movie adaptation of his first novel Looking For Alaska never got off the ground, the upcoming big-screen version of his latest best-seller The Fault in Our Stars, starring Shailene Woodley and Ansel Elgort, has millions of Green’s fans in anticipation. Green talked to EW about his hopes for the film and his life sinces the publication of TFIOS. READ FULL STORY

Watch John Green's commencement speech: 'Do not worry too much about your lawn' -- VIDEO

Author John Green — famous for The Fault In Our Stars and for making you laugh and then cry — has joined David Foster Wallace, Toni Morrison, and many others on the long list of Authors Giving Commencement Speeches with his address to Butler’s graduating class. Like theirs, Green is mostly warning the audience to not grow up and be terrible. It also comes with advice, such as: “Do not worry too much about your lawn.” And: “Keep reading. Specifically, read my books, ideally in hardcover.” The address is heartfelt and conversational, peppered with asides and references to the Internet — just like Green’s novels. Except this time: no deaths!

The full text of the speech is over on Green’s Tumblr. Watch it in full starting at 1:01:08 (“12 minutes flat, 11:45 if you don’t laugh”) below.

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On the scene: 'An Evening of Awesome' with John Green at Carnegie Hall

I’ve never been to Carnegie Hall before, and I certainly never dreamed that my first visit to the iconic theater would be to see an author. As I navigated the swarms of squealing fans to find my seat, I heard a young couple gushing about their attendance at the event. You know, the kind of gushing usually reserved for boy bands or Justin Bieber. “Oh, my God! I cannot believe this is happening! I’m totally freaking out! Like, it hasn’t even set in yet that this is really happening.”

And that illustrates the power best-selling author John Green holds over his fans. Green came together with his brother, Hank, and a slew of guest stars to present “An Evening of Awesome,” a variety show of sorts that totally lived up to its name. But you don’t have to take my word for it. The sold-out event was broadcast live on YouTube (watch it here), and has since acquired more than 40,000 views. Additionally, Carnegie Hall was No. 1 trending topic worldwide on Twitter. The moral of the story? Never underestimate the power of book nerds. (And I say that with the utmost affection, because I am one of those nerds…or should I say nerdfighters?) READ FULL STORY

Goodreads users select best books of 2012 -- FIRST LOOK

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The annual Goodreads Choice Awards are basically the People’s Choice Awards of books. Users of the literary social network voted on their favorite books of the year in 20 categories, and this year, there were some surprises — J.K. Rowling’s The Casual Vacancy as best novel? — and some slam dunks (Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl for Best Mystery, John Green for Best Young Adult, and Cheryl Strayed’s Wild for Best Memoir). Once again, Veronica Roth proved that she’s pretty much unbeatable when it comes to reader-voted prizes, winning the Best Goodreads Author award for the first time and the Best Young Adult Fantasy award for the second time with Insurgent, sequel to Divergent.

The closest race occurred in Best Historical Fiction, with M.L. Stedman’s The Light Between Oceans narrowly beating out Man Booker-winner Bring up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel. J.K. Rowling’s first adult novel most likely benefited from a large and devoted fanbase, as Casual Vacancy only became a finalist due to write-in votes — its Goodreads user rating of 3.32 stars wasn’t originally high enough to qualify it — yet it won the biggest honor.

Susan Cain’s Nonfiction win for her best-seller Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking made me smile — partly because I could picture a bunch of Goodreads bookworms really relating to it, and also because introverts, a sizable but often ignored and misunderstood demographic, have had a big year in 2012 with the publication of Quiet, Sophia Dembling’s The Introvert’s Way, and a buzzed-about feature in The Atlantic.

See the entire list of winners below: READ FULL STORY

Goodreads Choice Awards 2012 finalists announced

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Book nerds, you have some hard choices to make. The folks at Goodreads, the social networking hub for bibliophiles, have whittled down the field to 200 finalists — with 10 titles in 20 categories — for the Goodreads Choice Awards, voted on by Goodreads users.

In the Fiction category are some of the most beloved novels of the year, including Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walter, Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan, This Is How You Lose Her by Junot Diaz, The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker … and The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling? Rowling’s foray into adult fiction didn’t originally qualify for the long-list because it didn’t get the required 3.5-star user rating, but it earned enough write-in votes to become a finalist.

Another category to watch is Romance. E L James’ reps point to last year’s Goodreads Choice Awards as the tipping point that gave Fifty Shades of Grey a new level of recognition that eventually led to the phenomenon we all know about. Fifty Shades Freed goes up against Sylvia Day’s Bared to You and J.R. Ward’s Lover Reborn.

You can always count on Young Adult literature to generate enthusiastic online engagement. In the YA fiction category, the front-runner is certainly John Green’s wonderful novel The Fault in Our Stars. The #DFTBA movement should give him the win handily, although the dark horse might be Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein, which won a lot of fans this year. (It’s terrific). In the YA fantasy category, it’ll be a battle between Veronica Roth and Cassandra Clare to see whose extremely devoted followings will turn out in droves.

Go vote!

Follow @EWStephanLee on Twitter.

Read more:
See the new paperback cover of ‘The Age of Miracles’ by Karen Thompson Walker — EXCLUSIVE
And the 2012 National Book Award winners are …
National Book Award winner Katherine Boo on ‘Behind the Beautiful Forevers’, ‘unsexy’ topics, and ‘American Idol’ recaps

'Harry Potter' tops NPR's poll of 100 best young-adult novels

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The Harry Potter series conjured its way to the No. 1 spot in an online poll of best teen novels of all time conducted by NPR. J. K. Rowling’s series edged out The Hunger Games in second place and Harper Lee’s 1960s classic To Kill a Mockingbird in third. Other required-reading titles in the top 10 include The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien, Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, and Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury.

The top 10 also includes some deserving, non-franchise contemporary best-sellers. John Green, who has one of the most fervent followings of any YA author out there, had two titles in the top 10 — The Fault in Our Stars at No. 4 and Looking For Alaska at No. 9 — and five total in the top 100. Marcus Zusak’s inventive 2006 Holocaust novel The Book Thief came in at No. 10.

It looks like the Twihards didn’t mobilize for this particular poll. READ FULL STORY

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