Shelf Life Book news, reviews, trends, and talk

Tag: James Franco (1-10 of 10)

On the Books: 'New Yorker' archives available for free online, for now

the-new-yorker

The New Yorker has relaunched its website with a swanky new design (no more pagination!). In the fall, the magazine will introduce a new paywall system that’s similar to that of The New York Times. But for now, everything in its archives since 2007 are available to the public. To highlight those archives, they’ll be posting collections of different journalistic genres; profiles and love stories are already up. [The New Yorker]

David Orr reviews James Franco’s new poetry collection, Directing Herbert White, in the New York Times Book Review, taking his celebrity and academic credentials into account. “I’m obliged here to note that this actor is well acquainted with the educational system, having apparently attended graduate programs at Yale, Columbia, New York University, Brooklyn College, Warren Wilson College, the Rhode Island School of Design, Le Cordon Bleu, Quantico, Hogwarts (Ravenclaw), the Vaganova School of Russian Ballet and the Jedi Academy.” [The New York Times] READ FULL STORY

'Hi doggie!': Hear 'The Room' star Greg Sestero read from his memoir -- EXCLUSIVE AUDIOBOOK EXCERPT

When Entertainment Weekly first spoke to actor Greg Sestero back in 2008 the cult which surrounded his film The Room was still a small, mostly Los Angeles-based affair. Six years on, director-writer-star Tommy Wiseau’s fantastically awful film has become famous around the world and Sestero’s recent memoir The Disaster Artist – which concerns both the film’s production and his friendship with Wiseau — has been optioned by James Franco. READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Wendy Davis to release memoir; study finds more writers self-censoring

Today’s news features a memoir in the works, a study focusing on self-censoring over surveillance concerns, and literary real estate that’s worth millions. Read on for more headlines: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Eleanor Catton wins Man Booker Prize; National Book Award finalists announced

The-Luminaries.jpg

Awards dominate today’s book news, with the youngest winner of the Man Booker Prize announced Tuesday night and the National Book Award finalists revealed this morning. Below, more of today’s top headlines and must-reads: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Neil Gaiman's 'Neverwhere' removed from New Mexico school district

This weekend’s news featured a debate about the content of Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere, several upcoming anniversaries, and a philanthropic teenager. Read on for more of the top book headlines: READ FULL STORY

See James Franco star in the book trailer for 'Actors Anonymous': 'I Am The Actor' -- EXCLUSIVE

Actors-Anonymous.jpg

James Franco writes what he knows in his offbeat first novel Actors Anonymous (Oct. 15), which follows his debut short story collection Palo Alto (2010). The structure of the novel is based partly on the Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous, in that members of an actor’s support group make wild confessions from the trenches of their profession in each chapter.

In this exclusive book trailer, Franco and his fellow actors recite some of the maxims, confessions, observations found in the book, like “I’m a good actor, but sometimes I look like a bad actor,” and “I used to care about how I looked. Now I don’t care so much. Maybe it’s because I’m so handsome.”

See the video below: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Authors feud over Jonathan Franzen essay; Man Booker Prize goes global

Double the feuds, double the fun essays, with the Man Booker Prize and Jonathan Franzen stirring up literary controversies left and right. But even without the fighting, Thursday’s headlines include appearances by Junot Diaz and James Franco. Find out more below on today’s top books news: READ FULL STORY

Amazon Publishing to release James Franco novel

In a move that should surprise no one, James Franco is set to release his first novel, courtesy of the ever-expanding Amazon Publishing. The book, tentatively titled Actors Anonymous will reportedly be based — loosely — on the life of the actor/artist/writer/director/producer/host/perpetual student/clothing-optional magazine cover boy.

Franco released a collection of short stories, titled Palo Alto, in 2010 to mixed reviews and is currently involved in several book-to-screen adaptations. READ FULL STORY

James Franco talks poetry, 'Broken Tower,' and a whole lot of higher learning

James-FrancoImage Credit: Jon Furniss/WireImage.comJames Franco sat down with the Poetry Foundation to sound off on his latest poetry obsessions, including gay modernist poet Hart Crane, who he played in the upcoming biopic The Broken Tower (he also directed). Reading Franco’s lengthy, detailed responses, you can detect not only the caffeine that he undoubtedly needs in order to function—the man has a lot going on—but also a deep knowledge and genuine geek-fandom of his poetry heroes.

While Franco’s proves himself a discriminating poetry connoisseur, he seems equally opinionated on the finer points of the many institutions of higher learning he’s attended. Naysayers might have taken issue with his admission to Yale’s English PhD program, but the Ivy League doesn’t bow to his every wish just because he’s a movie star—Columbia wouldn’t even let him take poetry and fiction classes at the same time. But at this point, we know there’s so stopping this guy from getting educated:

James Franco: When I was at Columbia there were some great poets there, and I wanted to study with Richard Howard. I was in one of his lectures, but I wanted to take a poetry workshop with him, but they just said no [laughs]. You can cross over in the lectures and seminars, but fiction writers are not allowed to go to the poetry workshops. So I asked this guy named Ian R. Wilson, who taught me at UCLA Extension, what I should do. I had gone to UCLA when I was 18 to get my bachelor’s in English, and then I left after a year to act. I went back eight years later to finish, but before I re-enrolled, I took some classes through UCLA Extension. And I took a couple of writing classes with this guy named Ian R. Wilson.

It’s funny because the UCLA Extension writing classes have a great history—Michael Cunningham taught there, and John Rechy and Janet Fitch—so I took some classes there, and this guy Ian R. Wilson was my teacher. He wrote both fiction and poetry, and so when Columbia told me that I couldn’t take the poetry classes, I was pissed off. So I asked him, “Where should I go? I want a place so I can study poetry seriously.” Even though I am at Yale now, sure there are some classes on contemporary poetry, but not in the way that it’s studied at Warren Wilson.

At Yale, you study the Romantics, you study Whitman, but not contemporary poetry. Ian said, “For my money, Warren Wilson is the best poetry program in the country as far as the faculty goes and the way the program is run and the attention you get. You should go there.” And so I applied and they let me in.

Yeah. And he hasn’t even named all the schools he’s attended or taught at. It’s all very admirable, but is there a word for an addiction to education—maybe pedantiphilia?

Latest Videos in Books

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP