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Tag: J.K. Rowling (21-30 of 72)

On the Books: J.K. Rowling talks single parenthood; National Book Foundation unveils nonfiction longlist

J.K. Rowling pens an essay on life as a single parent, while Jeff Lindsay takes a look at what Dexter Morgan would keep on his bookshelves. In other news, which authors signed new deals? Is poetry useless? Scroll for more of today’s top books headlines below:

In a revealing piece for Gingerbread, a charity supporting single parents, J.K. Rowling writes that she’s “prouder of my years as a single mother than of any other part of my life.” [The Telegraph]

Jeff Lindsay, the mind behind Dexter, talks what a serial killer reads in an interview for Bookish. [Bookish]

The National Book Foundation continues its rollout of longlists. Today’s installment features nonfiction authors, with nine of the 10 authors receiving NBA recognition for the first time. [NBF]

Fangirl author Rainbow Rowell says parents in the Minneapolis area asked that her YA novel Eleanor & Park to be removed from library shelves. [The Toast]

Jamaican singer, actress and model Grace Jones is writing a memoir to be published by Gallery Books. “I wrote a song called ‘Art Groupie.’ First line said, ‘I’ll never write my memoirs'; that was a long time ago,” Jones says in a press release. “Since then, I thought, if I don’t do it, somebody else will.” The memoir is set to hit shelves in fall 2014.

Vikram Seth found a new publisher for his novel A Suitable Girl, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, which will publish the novel in 2016, after Seth’s deal with Penguin fell through. [New York Times]

In other deal-related news, best-selling fantasy author Terry Pratchett struck a 10-book, seven-figure one with Doubleday and Anchor Books. The first book in the series, Raising Steam, to be released in March. [New York Times]

Meanwhile, the media world’s revolving door continues to spin, as Nancy Gibbs is named the first-ever woman editor of Time magazine, succeeding Rick Stengel for the job. [TIME]

Today’s must-read essay: Noah Berlatsky tackles the question, “Is poetry useless?” [The Atlantic]

…And today’s must-read list: USA Today asked Twitter followers to share their favorite underrated female sleuths in literature. Among the winners: Lucy Pym, Flavia de Luce, Trixie Belden. [USA Today]

Lastly, check out the trailer for the latest adaptation of Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations, starring Helena Bonham-Carter as Miss Havisham. [LA Times]

On the Books: National Book Foundation picks '5 Under 35' honorees; judge rules on Lance Armstrong memoirs

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What’s J.K. Rowling’s next project? Who are the chosen ones for the National Book Foundation’s annual 5 Under 35 awards? Is Lance Armstrong really going to lie in his memoir?

Read on for all of today’s books headlines: READ FULL STORY

J.K. Rowling accepts charitable donation for identity revelation

Author J.K. Rowling accepted an apology and a charitable donation Wednesday from a law firm which revealed she wrote a crime novel under a pseudonym.

The Harry Potter author was exposed by a newspaper earlier this month as the author of The Cuckoo’s Calling, a thriller ostensibly written by former soldier and first-time novelist Robert Galbraith. READ FULL STORY

Robert Galbraith offered TV deals and other details from J.K. Rowling's FAQ section

J.K. Rowling may not be happy to have been outed as the true author behind pseudonym Robert Galbraith and his detective novel debut The Cuckoo’s Calling. But with increased sales and a barrage of media attention, Rowling decided to speak out about her latest work, releasing a new Frequently Asked Questions section on Robert Galbraith’s official website.

Here are five of the most interesting tidbits to come out of Rowling/Galbraith’s FAQ answers: READ FULL STORY

Law firm admits leaking J.K. Rowling alter ego

The mystery has been solved.

A British law firm admitted Thursday that one of its partners inadvertently revealed that J.K. Rowling had authored a mystery novel, The Cuckoo’s Calling.

The Sunday Times newspaper revealed over the weekend that the Harry Potter author had penned the book under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith.

The newspaper said it had received a tip-off on Twitter, and there was speculation that Rowling or her publisher were behind the revelation — which has sent sales of the thriller skyrocketing.

But law firm Russells said Thursday that one of its partners, Chris Gossage, had let the information slip to his wife’s best friend, Judith Callegari — the woman behind the tweet. Her Twitter account has now been deleted.

A phone message left for Callegari was not immediately returned.
READ FULL STORY

Signed copy of J.K. Rowling book could mean big money

Not many people owned a copy of The Cuckoo’s Calling before word leaked out over the weekend that author Robert Galbraith was, in fact, J.K. Rowling. But a handful who did have a signed edition.

And that could mean a lot of money.

Rowling spokeswoman Nicky Stonehill told The Associated Press on Tuesday that Rowling, the “Harry Potter” author, signed “a few copies” of her detective novel as “Robert Galbraith.” Wishing to keep her identity secret, Rowling made no promotional appearances for the book, published quietly in April, and Stonehill declined to say how any reader obtained a signed copy.

Bids for a signed first edition have topped $1,000 on eBay.

“Yes, those books will have value,” said Angel Webster of Bauman Rare Books in Manhattan. “The first edition is already a scarce commodity and she only signed a handful of them under vague circumstances.”
READ FULL STORY

J.K. Rowling revealed to be the author of debut mystery 'The Cuckoo's Calling'

Beloved Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling is no slacker. Less that a year after publishing her first novel for adults, The Casual Vacancy, she rushed out a mystery novel called The Cuckoo’s Calling. But unlike the much-hyped Vacancy, she published The Cuckoo’s Calling this spring under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith — a secret that has only just come to light this weekend.

In a statement to The Sunday Times of London, which followed up an anonymous tip with some literary sleuthing, Rowling fessed up that she is indeed Galbraith: “I had hoped to keep this secret a little longer, because being Robert Galbraith has been such a liberating experience. It has been wonderful to publish without hype or expectation, and pure pleasure to get feedback under a different name.”

Despite some sterling reviews (Publisher’s Weekly declared it a “stellar debut”), the book has barely made a sales ripple either in the U.K. or the U.S. It was published stateside in late April by Muholland Books, a three-year-old imprint of Little, Brown (which released The Casual Vacancy). One expects sales to explode now that Rowling has been revealed as the true author.

The Cuckoo’s Calling introduces a London private investigator named Cormoran Strike, an Afghanistan war veteran with an artificial lower leg, and his inquisitive office temp, Robin Ellacott, as they look into the supposed suicide of a high-profile supermodel named Lula Landry. One thing is certain: Strikingly original character names continue to be a Rowling hallmark.

Little, Brown publisher Reagan Arthur said in a statement that the company is planning to reprint the book with a revised author biography that reads: “Robert Galbraith is a pseudonym for J.K. Rowling.” In addition, she announced, “We are really looking forward to publishing the second book in the Strike series next summer.”

Follow Thom on Twitter: @Thom Geier

See the official 15th anniversary cover of 'Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone' -- FIRST LOOK

It seems like just yesterday we got all the Harry Potter books in digital form, but now we have another reason to collect another set of physical copies. Scholastic is releasing a new set of trade paperbacks in Sept. 2013 — which will also be available in a box set — to celebrate the 15th anniversary of the release of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling. Kazu Kibuishi, the artist behind the best-selling graphic novel series Amulet, has created the cover art for the new editions. See Sorcerer’s Stone below! READ FULL STORY

Goodreads users select best books of 2012 -- FIRST LOOK

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The annual Goodreads Choice Awards are basically the People’s Choice Awards of books. Users of the literary social network voted on their favorite books of the year in 20 categories, and this year, there were some surprises — J.K. Rowling’s The Casual Vacancy as best novel? — and some slam dunks (Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl for Best Mystery, John Green for Best Young Adult, and Cheryl Strayed’s Wild for Best Memoir). Once again, Veronica Roth proved that she’s pretty much unbeatable when it comes to reader-voted prizes, winning the Best Goodreads Author award for the first time and the Best Young Adult Fantasy award for the second time with Insurgent, sequel to Divergent.

The closest race occurred in Best Historical Fiction, with M.L. Stedman’s The Light Between Oceans narrowly beating out Man Booker-winner Bring up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel. J.K. Rowling’s first adult novel most likely benefited from a large and devoted fanbase, as Casual Vacancy only became a finalist due to write-in votes — its Goodreads user rating of 3.32 stars wasn’t originally high enough to qualify it — yet it won the biggest honor.

Susan Cain’s Nonfiction win for her best-seller Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking made me smile — partly because I could picture a bunch of Goodreads bookworms really relating to it, and also because introverts, a sizable but often ignored and misunderstood demographic, have had a big year in 2012 with the publication of Quiet, Sophia Dembling’s The Introvert’s Way, and a buzzed-about feature in The Atlantic.

See the entire list of winners below: READ FULL STORY

'Harry Potter: Page to Screen: The Complete Filmmaking Journey': The $1,000 box set for die-hard fans -- EXCLUSIVE

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You’ve already made a gift of the $500 complete set of films, so what can you offer a Harry Potter fan that would possibly top that? Never fear, readers: Amazon is releasing a $1,000 collector’s edition chronicling Harry’s journey from page to film just in time for the holidays — and we’ve got an exclusive first look at it.

Harry Potter: Page to Screen: The Complete Filmmaking Journey includes eight volumes, each of which is designed to resemble a book from the library shelves at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Six of the books focus on the workings of the creative departments behind the films — wardrobe, props, special effects, and the like — while the seventh is a commemorative keepsake offering an intimate look at the relationships that developed between the cast and crew over the decade it took to produce all eight films. But the best part by far is the eighth book: a scale replica of The Monster Book of Monsters (don’t worry, it doesn’t bite — I hope). So if your loved ones really love Harry Potter and you really love them, then you’ll consider purchasing this limited edition box set. Check it out below:

Harry Potter: Page to Screen: The Complete Filmmaking Journey doesn’t go on sale until Dec. 4, but you can pre-order it now on Amazon at a 40% discount. Don’t delay — there’s only 3,000 copies worldwide and unfortunately you can turn back time if you miss out on one of them. Happy Christmas!

Read more:
J.K. Rowling’s ‘The Casual Vacancy': 10 NSFW lines you would NEVER see in a Harry Potter book
J.K. Rowling says you can’t have sex near unicorns and other interesting facts about the ‘Harry Potter’ author
It’s Harry Potter’s Birthday. Celebrate by buying a just-announced $500 complete set

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