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Tag: J.K. Rowling (21-30 of 75)

J.K. Rowling muses on 'Harry Potter' character Gilderoy Lockhart for Pottermore -- EXCLUSIVE

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We are able to reveal new information from J.K. Rowling about one of the most colorful characters from the Harry Potter books: Gilderoy Lockhart.

Played by Kenneth Branagh in the films, the vain one-time Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher’s birthday falls on January 26th, and J.K. Rowling has recorded three short audio clips for Pottermore.com – the digital platform for the Harry Potter stories and the world described within them. These clips are being revealed today at A Celebration of Harry Potter at Universal Orlando Resort in Florida and will be released on Pottermore.com soon.

In the three clips, J.K. Rowling discusses her flamboyant creation’s family background, a failed business idea and where the Sorting Hat nearly put him during his time at Hogwarts. The audio reveals her mischievous sense of humour, and a penchant for poking fun at the excesses of celebrity, with echoes of today’s celebrity endorsement culture. READ FULL STORY

On the Books: British Harry Potter box set gets makeover with new artist chosen by J.K. Rowling

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The British edition of the Harry Potter series has gotten a visual makeover for its latest complete set, Bloomsbury has announced. The new editions have been redesigned with art by Jim Kay, an artist chosen by J.K. Rowling, and The Telegraph has a look. [The Telegraph]

Following Nelson Mandela’s death, NPR revisits his books, the autobiography Long Walk to Freedom and Conversations with Myself. Among all the coverage, there are also standout pieces from The New York Times, which published an extensive interactive graphic outlining his speeches and memorable quotes, and The New Yorker, which revisited the power of Mandela’s words through verse.

The Blue Peter Book Awards has announced its 2014 shortlist. The award celebrates children’s books in fiction and non-fiction categories, with the two winning books to be announced on March 6, 2014. [The Telegraph]

On to some must-reads: New poems by John Ashbery have been published in The American Reader. [The American Reader]

Susannah Jacob examines the life of Rose Williams, Tennessee Williams’ schizophrenic sister and the inspiration for The Glass Menagerie‘s Laura Wingfield. [The Paris Review]

Megan Garber predicts birds will be the primary enemy of Amazon’s delivery drones. [The Atlantic]

USA Today has a roundup of the best cookbooks for the holidays. [USA Today]

And ICYMI: Lena Dunham interviewed Judy Blume for Believer magazine. [EW]

On the Books: Debut novel bought by Scott Rudin finds publisher for a $2 million contract

A first-time novelist struck gold with a staggering publishing deal, as well as a film in the works. Meanwhile, Malala Yousafzai’s book has unsurprisingly been banned in Pakistan, and stateside, the U.S. Postal Service worked out a deal with Amazon to deliver packages on Sundays. Read on for more book news:

Knopf has won the rights to Garth Risk Hallberg’s debut novel, City on Fire, for a whopping nearly $2 million. The novel, which already scored a film deal with The Social Network producer Scott Rudin, comes in at 900 pages and ignited a furious battle between dozens of publishers. [New York Times]

Malala Yousafzai’s I Am Malala has been banned in Pakistan’s private schools for “content which is against our country’s ideology and Islamic values,” Kashif Mirza, chairman of All Pakistan Private Schools Federation, told the AFP. [NPR]

The U.S. Postal Service is partnering with Amazon to deliver packages on Sundays. The deal is limited to Los Angeles and New York, but service will expand to other cities next year.  [New York Times]

Threshold Editions announced Friday it is halting publication of Dylan Davies’ The Embassy House: The Explosive Eyewitness Account of the Libyan Embassy Siege by the Soldier Who Was There, a book about last year’s attack in Benghazi, Libya, after doubts emerged about whether Davies had witnessed the raid. [AP]

J.K. Rowling says she will “never top Harry Potter” in an interview. “As far back as 2000 I knew perfectly well that I would never top Harry Potter. I knew that before the series ended,” she says. “But what do I love doing? I love writing, so clearly I’m going to continue to write.” [The Telegraph]

S.E. Hinton has been known to be private and media-averse, but the Outsiders author is on Twitter, happily tweeting her thoughts. Jon Michaud explores what it means for the author to participate in the “Twitter age.” [The New Yorker]

Publishers Weekly unveiled its list of the Best Children’s Books of 2013. [Publishers Weekly]

Here’s a no-guilt guide to putting down a bad book. [The Globe and Mail]

On the Books: J.K. Rowling talks single parenthood; National Book Foundation unveils nonfiction longlist

J.K. Rowling pens an essay on life as a single parent, while Jeff Lindsay takes a look at what Dexter Morgan would keep on his bookshelves. In other news, which authors signed new deals? Is poetry useless? Scroll for more of today’s top books headlines below:

In a revealing piece for Gingerbread, a charity supporting single parents, J.K. Rowling writes that she’s “prouder of my years as a single mother than of any other part of my life.” [The Telegraph]

Jeff Lindsay, the mind behind Dexter, talks what a serial killer reads in an interview for Bookish. [Bookish]

The National Book Foundation continues its rollout of longlists. Today’s installment features nonfiction authors, with nine of the 10 authors receiving NBA recognition for the first time. [NBF]

Fangirl author Rainbow Rowell says parents in the Minneapolis area asked that her YA novel Eleanor & Park to be removed from library shelves. [The Toast]

Jamaican singer, actress and model Grace Jones is writing a memoir to be published by Gallery Books. “I wrote a song called ‘Art Groupie.’ First line said, ‘I’ll never write my memoirs'; that was a long time ago,” Jones says in a press release. “Since then, I thought, if I don’t do it, somebody else will.” The memoir is set to hit shelves in fall 2014.

Vikram Seth found a new publisher for his novel A Suitable Girl, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, which will publish the novel in 2016, after Seth’s deal with Penguin fell through. [New York Times]

In other deal-related news, best-selling fantasy author Terry Pratchett struck a 10-book, seven-figure one with Doubleday and Anchor Books. The first book in the series, Raising Steam, to be released in March. [New York Times]

Meanwhile, the media world’s revolving door continues to spin, as Nancy Gibbs is named the first-ever woman editor of Time magazine, succeeding Rick Stengel for the job. [TIME]

Today’s must-read essay: Noah Berlatsky tackles the question, “Is poetry useless?” [The Atlantic]

…And today’s must-read list: USA Today asked Twitter followers to share their favorite underrated female sleuths in literature. Among the winners: Lucy Pym, Flavia de Luce, Trixie Belden. [USA Today]

Lastly, check out the trailer for the latest adaptation of Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations, starring Helena Bonham-Carter as Miss Havisham. [LA Times]

On the Books: National Book Foundation picks '5 Under 35' honorees; judge rules on Lance Armstrong memoirs

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What’s J.K. Rowling’s next project? Who are the chosen ones for the National Book Foundation’s annual 5 Under 35 awards? Is Lance Armstrong really going to lie in his memoir?

Read on for all of today’s books headlines: READ FULL STORY

J.K. Rowling accepts charitable donation for identity revelation

Author J.K. Rowling accepted an apology and a charitable donation Wednesday from a law firm which revealed she wrote a crime novel under a pseudonym.

The Harry Potter author was exposed by a newspaper earlier this month as the author of The Cuckoo’s Calling, a thriller ostensibly written by former soldier and first-time novelist Robert Galbraith. READ FULL STORY

Robert Galbraith offered TV deals and other details from J.K. Rowling's FAQ section

J.K. Rowling may not be happy to have been outed as the true author behind pseudonym Robert Galbraith and his detective novel debut The Cuckoo’s Calling. But with increased sales and a barrage of media attention, Rowling decided to speak out about her latest work, releasing a new Frequently Asked Questions section on Robert Galbraith’s official website.

Here are five of the most interesting tidbits to come out of Rowling/Galbraith’s FAQ answers: READ FULL STORY

Law firm admits leaking J.K. Rowling alter ego

The mystery has been solved.

A British law firm admitted Thursday that one of its partners inadvertently revealed that J.K. Rowling had authored a mystery novel, The Cuckoo’s Calling.

The Sunday Times newspaper revealed over the weekend that the Harry Potter author had penned the book under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith.

The newspaper said it had received a tip-off on Twitter, and there was speculation that Rowling or her publisher were behind the revelation — which has sent sales of the thriller skyrocketing.

But law firm Russells said Thursday that one of its partners, Chris Gossage, had let the information slip to his wife’s best friend, Judith Callegari — the woman behind the tweet. Her Twitter account has now been deleted.

A phone message left for Callegari was not immediately returned.
READ FULL STORY

Signed copy of J.K. Rowling book could mean big money

Not many people owned a copy of The Cuckoo’s Calling before word leaked out over the weekend that author Robert Galbraith was, in fact, J.K. Rowling. But a handful who did have a signed edition.

And that could mean a lot of money.

Rowling spokeswoman Nicky Stonehill told The Associated Press on Tuesday that Rowling, the “Harry Potter” author, signed “a few copies” of her detective novel as “Robert Galbraith.” Wishing to keep her identity secret, Rowling made no promotional appearances for the book, published quietly in April, and Stonehill declined to say how any reader obtained a signed copy.

Bids for a signed first edition have topped $1,000 on eBay.

“Yes, those books will have value,” said Angel Webster of Bauman Rare Books in Manhattan. “The first edition is already a scarce commodity and she only signed a handful of them under vague circumstances.”
READ FULL STORY

J.K. Rowling revealed to be the author of debut mystery 'The Cuckoo's Calling'

Beloved Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling is no slacker. Less that a year after publishing her first novel for adults, The Casual Vacancy, she rushed out a mystery novel called The Cuckoo’s Calling. But unlike the much-hyped Vacancy, she published The Cuckoo’s Calling this spring under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith — a secret that has only just come to light this weekend.

In a statement to The Sunday Times of London, which followed up an anonymous tip with some literary sleuthing, Rowling fessed up that she is indeed Galbraith: “I had hoped to keep this secret a little longer, because being Robert Galbraith has been such a liberating experience. It has been wonderful to publish without hype or expectation, and pure pleasure to get feedback under a different name.”

Despite some sterling reviews (Publisher’s Weekly declared it a “stellar debut”), the book has barely made a sales ripple either in the U.K. or the U.S. It was published stateside in late April by Muholland Books, a three-year-old imprint of Little, Brown (which released The Casual Vacancy). One expects sales to explode now that Rowling has been revealed as the true author.

The Cuckoo’s Calling introduces a London private investigator named Cormoran Strike, an Afghanistan war veteran with an artificial lower leg, and his inquisitive office temp, Robin Ellacott, as they look into the supposed suicide of a high-profile supermodel named Lula Landry. One thing is certain: Strikingly original character names continue to be a Rowling hallmark.

Little, Brown publisher Reagan Arthur said in a statement that the company is planning to reprint the book with a revised author biography that reads: “Robert Galbraith is a pseudonym for J.K. Rowling.” In addition, she announced, “We are really looking forward to publishing the second book in the Strike series next summer.”

Follow Thom on Twitter: @Thom Geier

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