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Tag: Interview (81-90 of 143)

'The Golden Lily': A brand new excerpt and Q&A with author Richelle Mead -- EXCLUSIVE

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Last year, author Richelle Mead graduated from her popular Vampire Academy books and released Bloodlines, the first volume in a new six-part spin-off series. We got our hands on the first chapter of The Golden Lily (out June 12) and spoke to Mead about Sydney’s future in the series — and why fans might be throwing the new book across the room (in delight?) when they finish reading it. Read on for the exclusive excerpt!

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Did you know that the last line of Bloodlines would create such a stir?
RICHELLE MEAD: I kind of hoped it would, but some of the reactions surprised me! I had a few people say they threw the book across the room in happiness when they read that line, which is funny since a lot of people also threw Shadow Kiss across their rooms in frustration when they read the last line of that book. I guess my books are just destined to take a beating… but hopefully it’s a compliment. Something tells me The Golden Lily may see a few walls.

What can you tell us about Dimitri’s role in the second book? READ FULL STORY

Kevin Smith talks about his memoir 'Tough Sh*t' and Liam Neeson's nether regions

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Those who have perused the current issue of Entertainment Weekly know it features a Q&A with director Kevin Smith in which he talks about his troubled working relationship with Bruce Willis on Cop Out, the 2010 incident where he was removed from a Southwest Airlines flight because of his weight, and his new memoir-cum-self-help book, Tough Sh*t: Life Advice From a Fat, Lazy Slob Who Did Good (out tomorrow).

But is that all the voluble Clerks auteur had to say for himself? Not even close. Below, Smith ruminates further on his new tome, why he hasn’t spoken to Harvey Weinstein for over a year, and the person he would most love to have read a Liam Neeson penis joke.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: You’ve published books before that collected your articles and blog entries and podcast ruminations. This is the first time you sat down and wrote a “book” book. What was that process like?
KEVIN SMITH: Honestly? A true pain in the a–. It sounded so much easier when I pitched it. Once again, I blame Twitter. I love Twitter and I blame Twitter for everything. I was online on Twitter for maybe a couple of months doing these things called “Smonologues.” People would ask questions like, “I hate myself. I’m fat. What the f— am I supposed to do?” I just wrote this monologue by way of Twitter, 140 characters at a time. Eventually, I compiled it and put it into a blog. I had about 10 of them and they were pretty popular and I said, “You could actually compile these into a book.” Once again I was thinking, I’ve already done the work, let me just publish it. READ FULL STORY

Kristen Johnston talks about her drug addiction, her life-threatening illness, her recovery, and her new memoir, 'Guts.'

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In the new issue of Entertainment Weekly there is a lengthy Q&A with actress Kristen Johnston in which she talks about how her addiction to Vicodin caused her stomach to explode, her subsequent recovery, and her new memoir, Guts. But the 3rd Rock from the Sun star had far more to say than we could fit in the pages of the magazine. Below, Johnston talks further about her travails, her time on 3rd Rock, and why James Frey is not completely “full of s—.”

READ FULL STORY

Brad Goreski sounds off on Rachel Zoe, his battle with addiction, and his new memoir 'Born to Be Brad'

Brad Goreski emerged as the quotable breakout star of Bravo’s The Rachel Zoe Project, in which he served as an assistant to the celebrity stylist. Since parting with Zoe on bad terms, Goreski has become a big name in fashion in his own right, and his own Bravo spinoff It’s a Brad, Brad World finished airing its first season. In his new book Born to Be Brad, Goreski imparts fashion advice while talking candidly about his childhood and battles with addiction, as well as his time working for Zoe and his rise to fame. Goreski dishes on the details below: READ FULL STORY

Erin Duffy on her Wall Street roman a clef 'Bond Girl'

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After she was laid off from Merrill Lynch in 2008, Erin Duffy decided not to jump back into the Wall Street game. Instead, she used what she saw in the workplace to write Bond Girl, a roman à clef that reveals the behind-the-scenes story of a young woman working in a male-dominated industry. Just before the 2008 financial collapse, 22-year-old Alex Garrett joins the bond sales team at Cromwell Pierce, where she encounters unwanted sexual advances, office pranks, and the type of truly odd behavior that can only be found on Wall Street (wheeling a $1,000 block of cheese across New York; a secretary who throws weekend slumber parties in the office). EW’s Sara Vilkomerson wrote, “Bond Girl is a sparkling debut, smart and snappy but never weighed down by financial terminology. Who knew Wall Street could be this much fun?” Read below for Duffy’s thoughts on the book and women in finance. READ FULL STORY

Vinny Guadagnino of 'Jersey Shore' to 'Control the Crazy' in upcoming book -- EXCLUSIVE

In the most recent episode of Jersey Shore, the usually laid-back Vinny Guadagnino walked out of the shore house after a bout of anxiety. It was a sad night for MVP — or RVP? — fans, but Vinny’s decision to leave partially inspired his upcoming book, Control the Crazy: My Plan to Stop Stressing, Avoid Drama and Maintain Your Inner Cool (April 17). Joining the ranks of published authors and cast mates Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi, Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino, and Jenni “JWOWW” Farley, the book will be a “prescriptive memoir” that doles out advice on how to handle anxiety as well as behind-the-scenes stories from Guadagnino’s life. Read on for Vinny’s tips on how to get out of a funk, his explanation for why he left the house, and which of his Jersey Shore cast mates may need to read his book.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: What drove you to write Control the Crazy?
VINNY GUADAGNINO: I’ve been writing this book and putting this program together in my head for a while now. I’ve always wanted to help people that have been through the same thing I have or been through anything hard in their lives. It helps me when I help people. I’ve been putting it together for a long time, and making an outline and putting the small pieces together but then it wasn’t until I realized when I was going to have this moment when I left and everyone would actually see what I’m going through. Once it was put in the spotlight I said, “You know what? Now’s a great opportunity.” People get it, they’ll relate to it, and they know if they want to seek help or read a self-help book that they can relate to, then now’s the perfect time to let it out. READ FULL STORY

John Irving on sexual identity and why he hates being asked if his work is autobiographical

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John Irving, who turns 70 this year, will publish his latest novel on May 8. In One Person tells the story of Billy Abbott, a bisexual man who struggles with his identity and attraction to men, women, and transgendered individuals as the world changes around him. EW spoke to Irving to find out what we can expect of his highly anticipated novel, and you can find more from the interview in the current issue of the magazine, which is on stands tomorrow. In the meantime, see below for a single response from that interview about a question that gets him riled up. He sounds off about the limited imagination of today’s reading audience and his own complicated sexual history. READ FULL STORY

'Walking Dead' creator Robert Kirkman talks about his new comic, 'Thief of Thieves'

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When Shelf Life points out to Robert Kirkman that he is best known for writing comics about zombies, superheroes, and dinosaurs, the scribe guffaws. Why? “I’m laughing at the absurdity of my life,” says the man responsible for penning Invincible, Super Dinosaur, and, yes, a little post-apocalyptic zombie series called The Walking Dead.

Kirkman’s new project, Thief of Thieves, is an attempt to make his life a little less absurd. “It’s going to be very grounded in the real world,” he says of the comic, which hits shelves Feb. 8. “No zombies, no space aliens, no superheroes. It’s just going to be real human characters doing somewhat horrible things to each other.”

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: So what else can you tell us about Thief of Thieves?
ROBERT KIRKMAN: Well, it’s a fine comic book, if I do say so myself. It’s somewhat of a crime-caper comic about a professional thief named Conrad Paulson. He is one of the greatest thieves who’s ever lived, but he’s gotten to a point in his life where he realizes that he’s chosen his professional life over his family life and greatly regrets that. He’s got an adult son who is kind of following in his footsteps but doing a horrible job, and he has an estranged wife that he is still very much in love with. Our story picks up when he is trying to turn his back on his profession and rekindle his relationship with his wife and trying to fix his son’s horrible predicament. READ FULL STORY

Caroline Kepnes (a.k.a. Audrey Hart) on her new YA novel 'The Dig'

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Recently, Backlit Fiction released a series of teen ebooks, including The Dig by author and television writer Caroline Kepnes (writing under the pen name Audrey Hart). The Dig, the first installment of the Zoe and Zeus trilogy, centers on a smart, savvy teenager named Zoe Calder who finds a portal to the world of teenage Greek gods — Mount Olympus is like a high school, where there are mean girls and Zeus is the hottest guy around — while exploring an archaeological excavation site. Kepnes took the time to chat with EW about her new YA novel and the idea behind modernizing Greek mythology. READ FULL STORY

Sloane Crosley on her new Kindle Single and how bad experiences make for funny stories

Book publicist turned best-selling author Sloane Crosley doesn’t have a new book coming out any time soon, but for those of us who are eager for more of her hilarious, perceptive observations, it’s lucky she’s gotten into the digital publishing game. Up the Down Volcano, Crosley’s first full-length essay since the publication of her second collection How Did You Get This Number, is available exclusively on Amazon as a Kindle Single. This hilarious yet harrowing account of summiting the Ecuadorian stratovolcano Cotopaxi — Crosley-style — reads more like an epic than her previous works, yet it retains her signature brand of intelligent humor, which stems from keen observation and honest self-assessment. EW caught up with this busy writer to talk about her new Single, the ways digital publishing can resemble the music industry, Arrested Development, and a lot more.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: I laughed out loud while reading “Up the Down Volcano,” but I was also very conscious of the fact that your experience couldn’t have been funny when you were going through it. Are many of the experiences you write about only funny in retrospect?
SLOANE CROSLEY: Yes. Those generally make for better stories. I think that if you can see the humor while it’s happening – this is cliché – you’re tempted to not live in the moment, or it’s already fermenting into a story in your mind as it’s happening. You start mentally taking notes; that doesn’t necessarily mean it won’t come out as funny or a worthwhile story on the other side, but for me personally, it’s more rewarding if there’s something [deeper] going on. Part of me thinks that it’s a defense mechanism that takes the pressure off of just trying to be funny, but most of me thinks that’s where people need humor the most, both as readers and as writers. READ FULL STORY

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