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Tag: Haruki Murakami (1-8 of 8)

Haruki Murakami's 'Strange Library' to arrive in December

Known for a large body of work including 1Q84 and Norwegian Wood, Japanese author Haruki Murakami is set to release an English-language translation of his story The Strange Library on Dec. 2. READ FULL STORY

Trailer Released for Haruki Murakami's New Novel

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Today, Knopf released an online trailer for Haruki Murakami’s Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage via YouTube. 

Like Murakami’s writing, the trailer is poetic and unusual—and deceivingly captivating for its visual simplicity. The graphics, consistent with the book’s cover, are simple and striking: Bold black text and colorful geometric shapes set against a white screen, often producing after-images that linger for just a moment. READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Book about Reagan's rise stirs controversy

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Chris Ashby, a lawyer representing Reagan’s Revolution author Craig Shirley, has cited 19 instances of duplicated wording and insufficient or incomplete attribution from Shirley’s text in Rick Perlstein’s The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan, the new 856-page third volume in Perlstein’s history of politics in the 1960s and 1970s, The New York Times reports. According to the Times, Shirley’s lawyer has asked for a public apology and $25 million in damages, and has requested that revisions be made to digital editions and that all physical copies of the book be destroyed. Shirley said he has since found almost 50 instances of his work being used without credit.

Perlstein, however, told The New York Times that he cited Shirley’s book 125 times on his website, where he posted his source notes. “These are paraphrases,” Perlstein said. “I’m reverent toward my sources. History is a team sport, and references are how you support your teammates.”

Perlstein and his publisher published endnotes online instead of at the back of the book, because an in-print endnote section would have ballooned the book’s page count to more than 1,000, and because online endnotes can be more extensive than print ones. “My notion is that people will read this book with their iPhones open,” Perlstein said. Other publishers and academics remain apprehensive about publishing sources online, saying that the documentation can be lost, or that the URL may no longer work in the future. [The New York Times]

Patti Smith reviews Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami. “This is a book for both the new and experienced reader. It has a strange casualness, as if it unfolded as Murakami wrote it; at times, it seems like a prequel to a whole other narrative. The feel is uneven, the dialogue somewhat stilted, either by design or flawed in translation. Yet there are moments of epiphany gracefully expressed, especially in regard to how people affect one another.” [The New York Times]

Libraries are struggling with ebook lending, according to a report from the International Federation of Library Associations. Many publishers have inconsistent licensing practices, so libraries have trouble keeping many of them consistently available. Furthermore, they face competition from growing commercial ebook subscription services like Kindle Unlimited, Oyster, and Scribd. [Publishers Weekly]

The market for anti-Hillary Clinton books is booming, which might be a good sign for Clinton. [The Christian Science Monitor]

On the Books: There are too many poets laureate in the U.S.

The New York Times examines the rampant wave of poets laureate in the United States. “‘I’ve been to places where there is a poet laureate for every ZIP code,’ Billy Collins, a former United States and New York State laureate, said. ‘The country is crawling with them. I think it’s out of control.'” [The New York Times]

An excerpt from Haruki Murakami’s upcoming book, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, and an interactive introduction to the novel. [Slate]

Diamond, a comic book distribution company, released its mid-2014 state-of-the-industry report. Comic book merchandise sales are up, but actual comic book sales are down. [Publishers Weekly]

Andrew Crofts, one of the most successful writers you’ve never heard of, speaks about his ghostwriting career. He’s written 80 books in 40 years, and his books have sold over 10 million copies. He earns more than most professional writers, and charges an average of six figures (in pounds) for his books. [The Guardian]

Reviewing three new books about banned literature (UlyssesDoctor Zhivago, and The Satanic Verses), Leo Robinson digs into the history of literary censorship. “An often heard literary argument against censorship is that—as well as misrepresenting novels—it dominates their reputations.” [The New Statesman]

In a wide-ranging interview, The Rumpus talks to novelist and Authors Guild co-vice president Ricard Russo about the Amazon-Hachette dispute, a career in writing fiction, and the future of publishing. [The Rumpus]

The New Yorker highlights five pieces from its archive about New York City. [The New Yorker]

On the Books: Reviews are in for Hillary Clinton's new memoir

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Reviews are pouring in for Hillary Clinton’s new memoir Hard Choices, and they’re all over the map. Robin Abcarian at the Los Angeles Times writes that the book “leaves no room for doubt about how she might conduct foreign policy (pragmatically), how she will defend herself against charges that she mishandled the attack on the American compound in Benghazi, Libya (robustly) and about how much she regrets giving President George W. Bush carte blanche to wage war against Iraq (deeply and eternally).” Michiko Kakutani over at the New York Times calls it “a subtle, finely calibrated work that provides a portrait of the former secretary of state and former first lady as a heavy-duty policy wonk” and compares it favorably to Clinton’s 2003 book, Living History. On the other hand, Isaac Chotiner at The New Republic refutes Kakutani, saying her review is filled with generalizations. He writes, “if Kakutani is going to make claims for the book’s merits, she must follow through on her generic praise, and offer some sense of what is valuable in the book, or at least some sense of what she enjoyed about it.” And at Slate, critic John Dickerson says it’s filled with “safe, methodical writing.” In keeping with tradition, Clinton doesn’t reveal whether she’s running for president in 2016. Okay, Hillary; whatever you say. READ FULL STORY

On The Books: join the Beat Generation with Ferlinghetti's travel journals

Lawrence Ferlinghetti, the Beat poet and co-founder of City Lights Bookstore in San Francisco, has sold the rights to his travel journals to Liveright Publishing. They plan to release the collection, titled Writing Across the Landscape: Travel Journals (1950-2013), in September 2015. It sounds like it will be a counterculture travel guide and a historical snapshot of the second half of the 20th century rolled into one. The New York Times reports:

The journal material, most of it being published for the first time, sheds as much light on Mr. Ferlinghetti’s political passions as on his relationships with the Beat writers. His itinerary takes him to Mexico, Haiti and North Africa, to Cuba in the throes of the Castro revolution, to Franco’s Spain, to Soviet Russia for the 1968 Writers’ Congress, and to Nicaragua under the Sandinistas. It also includes his frequent trips to Italy and to France, where he lived for four years while pursuing a doctorate at the Sorbonne in Paris. Along the way, he records his encounters with Pablo Neruda, Ezra Pound, Ernesto Cardenal, Yevgeny Yevtushenko and Andrei Voznesensky.

On April 18th, Haruki Murakami will publish his first collection of short stories in nine years. The title “Onna no Inai Otokotachi” translates to “Men Without Women” and will be a compilation of short novels that have previously appeared in magazines, as well as one new offering. Apparently there was some scandal around the story “Drive My Car — Men Without Women.” The town featured in the story was offended by Murakami’s portrayal. Supposedly he apologized, but then he went and named the whole collection after that story, so that’s confusing. I’ll chalk it up to “lost in translation.” [Yahoo]

Some post-grad student at Cambridge translated Lorem Ipsum, that swatch of dummy text that acts as a placeholder in the publishing biz. I love finding meaning in nonsense. It’s almost a superstition, when I walk down the street and I try to make sentences out of the snippets of words from graffiti, old posters, torn stickers–in case it’s a secret message for me. Like the little boy in Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. In this case, it paid off. The translated paragraph reads almost like e.e. cummings. The first sentence: “Rrow itself, let it be sorrow; let him love it; let him pursue it, ishing for its acquisitiendum.” This doesn’t come as a total surprise because the text was originally pasted together by a 16th-century printer who “got there by mangling Cicero’s ‘De finibus bonorum et malorum’, an exposition of Stoicism, Epicureanism and the Platonism of Antiochus of Ascalon.” [London Review of Books]
Over at the Guardian, Adrian McKinty has written a literary jaunt through the historical and futuristic settings of fantasy novels, all in service of the question: When and where is Game of Thrones set? Read it for a full explanation because he has some very interesting examples, but his final conclusion is that Game of Thrones is set “not in some canned version of our medieval past but in the far future when the continents have shifted and some humans have evolved extraordinary physical and mental abilities which, to paraphrase Arthur C. Clarke, are indistinguishable from magic…As the sun expands, Earth’s orbit becomes more eccentric and massive variations in climate are to be expected, resulting in stretched-out summers and long, deadly winters.”

On The Books: Murakami's new novel; plus, audiobooks with Neil Gaiman, Roald Dahl, Bill Bryson

Haruki Murakami’s new novel, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, will be published in the U.S. on August 12th. The book has been out in Japan since last April and sold more than a million copies in its first week. The Guardian writes that the story “hinges around Tsukuru Tazaki, an isolated 36-year-old man struggling to overcome the trauma of rejection by his high-school friends years earlier. Like its title, the novel’s opening line might not sound like obvious best-seller material: ‘From July of his sophomore year at college to January next year, Tsukuru Tazaki was living while mostly thinking about dying.'”

READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Pat Conroy wants film adaptation of memoir; World Book Night to give away Stephen Chbosky's 'Perks'

Who does Pat Conroy have in mind to star in a film adaptation of his memoir? Which books will be given away for World Book Night? Who’s on all the shortlists? Answers to those and more top headlines below:

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