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Tag: Harry Potter (11-20 of 64)

More Potter on Pottermore! 'History of Quidditch' Part 2 now available!

More Potter! More Potter! Fridays are so much better with Harry Potter stories. The second installment of The History of the Quidditch World Cup, the follow up to last week’s story on Pottermore, has gone up online today. This section covers “amusing recaps of some notable recent matches that have been held every four years since 1990.” Let’s get a Kickstarter campaign together to beg J.K. Rowling to release chapters from the wizard-verse every week. I know that she already has all the money she could want, but there must be something we could offer her as encouragement…any ideas?

In other book news, the author and journalist Khushwant Singh passed away at age 99. The Guardian says that “he held a particular place in Indian life as a critic of the establishment and a challenger of hypocrisy.” His mosaic ethnic background helped make him a keen observer of India’s modern history, especially its violent division into Muslim and Hindu countries: “Though his mother tongue was Punjabi and his cultural language was Urdu – he loved the Urdu poets and knew the Persian script – he chose to write in English, and soaked himself in Punjabi, Urdu and English and other European literature. Intellectually independent, he never took himself too seriously, and despite his Sikh background was an unrepentant agnostic. He made quite a success out of poking fun at pomposity, self‑righteousness, religiosity and his country’s myriad gods.”

Sounds like we could all take a page from his book. Speaking of ripping out pages, a publisher of Immanuel Kant’s essays on reason and judgement placed a “political correction” notice on its version of Kant’s Critiques. It reads: “This book is a product of its time and does not reflect the same values as it would if it were written today. Parents might wish to discuss with their children how views on race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and interpersonal relations have changed since this book was written before allowing them to read this classic work.” Since when do we need to add a caveat to one of the western world’s greatest philosophers? [Open Culture]

Holy Quidditch Cup! More stories from J.K. Rowling on Pottermore

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Attention Potter Fans! (That’s the same as saying “attention everyone.”) J.K. Rowling has written a 2,400 word story on the “History of the Quidditch World Cup” and she’s given it exclusively to Pottermore to post in two parts, half today and half next Friday, March 21st.

Part one, which is going up today, provides historical background about the tournament, information about how the tournament works, and examples of controversial tournaments, including the infamous 1877 match played in Kazakhstan’s Ryn Desert now known as the Tournament that Nobody Remembers. READ FULL STORY

J.K. Rowling admits Hermione didn't really belong with Ron

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Seven years after putting the finishing touches on her Harry Potter books, J.K. Rowling is having second thoughts about romantically pairing Hermione with Ron. Some fans of the books never warmed to the idea that the bookish girl and the clumsy but loyal red-head were meant to be — especially since Harry and Hermione always seemed so perfect for each other. Now, in an upcoming interview with Emma Watson in Wonderland magazine (and teased in today’s Sunday Times), Rowling admits that she might have done things differently. “If I’m absolutely honest, distance has given me perspective on that,” she told Watson, who’s guest-editor for the magazine. “It was a choice I made for very personal reasons, not for reasons of credibility. Am I breaking people’s hearts by saying this? I hope not.”

“I wrote the Hermione/Ron relationship as a form of wish fulfillment,” Rowling said. “That’s how it was conceived, really. For reasons that have very little to do with literature and far more to do with me clinging to the plot as I first imagined it, Hermione ended up with Ron.”

Watson didn’t seem shocked by the revelation, telling Rowling, “I think there are fans out there who know that too and who wonder whether Ron would have really been able to make her happy.”

Bad news for Ron Weasley. But at least Rowling didn’t kill him off altogether.

J.K. Rowling muses on 'Harry Potter' character Gilderoy Lockhart for Pottermore -- EXCLUSIVE

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We are able to reveal new information from J.K. Rowling about one of the most colorful characters from the Harry Potter books: Gilderoy Lockhart.

Played by Kenneth Branagh in the films, the vain one-time Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher’s birthday falls on January 26th, and J.K. Rowling has recorded three short audio clips for Pottermore.com – the digital platform for the Harry Potter stories and the world described within them. These clips are being revealed today at A Celebration of Harry Potter at Universal Orlando Resort in Florida and will be released on Pottermore.com soon.

In the three clips, J.K. Rowling discusses her flamboyant creation’s family background, a failed business idea and where the Sorting Hat nearly put him during his time at Hogwarts. The audio reveals her mischievous sense of humour, and a penchant for poking fun at the excesses of celebrity, with echoes of today’s celebrity endorsement culture. READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Ylvis' 'The Fox' children's book breaks records; 'Harry Potter' prequel headed to the stage

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A fox and a boy wizard lead today’s book headlines. Read on for more news: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: British Harry Potter box set gets makeover with new artist chosen by J.K. Rowling

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The British edition of the Harry Potter series has gotten a visual makeover for its latest complete set, Bloomsbury has announced. The new editions have been redesigned with art by Jim Kay, an artist chosen by J.K. Rowling, and The Telegraph has a look. [The Telegraph]

Following Nelson Mandela’s death, NPR revisits his books, the autobiography Long Walk to Freedom and Conversations with Myself. Among all the coverage, there are also standout pieces from The New York Times, which published an extensive interactive graphic outlining his speeches and memorable quotes, and The New Yorker, which revisited the power of Mandela’s words through verse.

The Blue Peter Book Awards has announced its 2014 shortlist. The award celebrates children’s books in fiction and non-fiction categories, with the two winning books to be announced on March 6, 2014. [The Telegraph]

On to some must-reads: New poems by John Ashbery have been published in The American Reader. [The American Reader]

Susannah Jacob examines the life of Rose Williams, Tennessee Williams’ schizophrenic sister and the inspiration for The Glass Menagerie‘s Laura Wingfield. [The Paris Review]

Megan Garber predicts birds will be the primary enemy of Amazon’s delivery drones. [The Atlantic]

USA Today has a roundup of the best cookbooks for the holidays. [USA Today]

And ICYMI: Lena Dunham interviewed Judy Blume for Believer magazine. [EW]

On the Books: National Book Foundation picks '5 Under 35' honorees; judge rules on Lance Armstrong memoirs

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What’s J.K. Rowling’s next project? Who are the chosen ones for the National Book Foundation’s annual 5 Under 35 awards? Is Lance Armstrong really going to lie in his memoir?

Read on for all of today’s books headlines: READ FULL STORY

New 'Half-Blood Prince' cover revealed! Plus: Illustrator Kazu Kibuishi talks bringing books' magic to life -- EXCLUSIVE

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Dumbledore and Harry stand solemnly along the rocky shores of an ominous cave — readying themselves to destroy one of Voldemort’s Horcruxes. Sadly for mega fans worldwide, this isn’t a sneak peek at a new Harry Potter book, but it sure looks like one.

Author and illustrator Kazu Kibuishi, known for his graphic novel work on Flight and Amulet, continues his tenure as Harry Potter cover artist with the moody paperback cover for J.K. Rowling’s penultimate novel in the series. The cover is being revealed currently by Scholastic at Comic-Con in San Diego, but you’re seeing it online here first!

EW asked Kibuishi about following Mary GrandPré’s footsteps and his process for illustrating the covers for the beloved fantasy series: READ FULL STORY

Law firm admits leaking J.K. Rowling alter ego

The mystery has been solved.

A British law firm admitted Thursday that one of its partners inadvertently revealed that J.K. Rowling had authored a mystery novel, The Cuckoo’s Calling.

The Sunday Times newspaper revealed over the weekend that the Harry Potter author had penned the book under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith.

The newspaper said it had received a tip-off on Twitter, and there was speculation that Rowling or her publisher were behind the revelation — which has sent sales of the thriller skyrocketing.

But law firm Russells said Thursday that one of its partners, Chris Gossage, had let the information slip to his wife’s best friend, Judith Callegari — the woman behind the tweet. Her Twitter account has now been deleted.

A phone message left for Callegari was not immediately returned.
READ FULL STORY

Here's to you, Judy Blume: A toast to 'Tiger Eyes' and 'regular kid' lit

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Davey Wexler is not a witch. She’s not a skilled huntress, fighting for her life as a rapacious crowd watches her every move. She’s not even a clumsy, moody wallflower inadvertently drawn into a sexy world of immortal bloodsuckers.

Instead, Davey’s just, well… Davey, an average 15-year-old dealing with average teenage problems: the sudden death of a loved one, a big move to a new town and a new school, a best friend who drinks just a little too much. Nothing about her life is sensationalized, not even the bloody holdup that abruptly robs her of her father — which is probably why Davey resonated so deeply with me when I first met her in the late ’90s. (Her cool, androgynous name and relationship with a mysterious dude named Wolf didn’t hurt, either.)

And when Davey re-entered my life a few weeks ago — via Lawrence and Judy Blume’s new film adaptation of Tiger Eyes — I realized something else about her essential ordinariness: In a modern YA landscape glutted with fantastical dystopias, supernatural romances, brand-name-soaked glamoramas, and hyperbolic tragedy, what makes this heroine remarkable is the fact that she’s not very remarkable at all.

READ FULL STORY

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