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Tag: Graphic Novels (1-10 of 50)

See the first two pages of 'Walking Dead' creator Robert Kirkman's new 'Outcast' comic

Robert Kirkman has already conquered the zombie genre with his comic book-turned-television hit The Walking Dead, and now he is ready to turn his attention to demonic possession with a new comic titled Outcast. Written by Kirkman and illustrated by Paul Azaceta, issue #1 of Outcast will be released June 25, and you can get an exclusive sneak peek at the first two pages right here. Not only that, but we spoke to Kirkman to get the inside scoop on his latest project (which already has a TV adaptation deal in place with Fox International and Cinemax). Read on for more, and then check out the first two pages, which end on a truly disturbing note. READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Mario Lopez memoir arriving this fall

Saved by the Bell‘s Mario Lopez’s upcoming memoir Just Between Us will be released on September 30. In the book, the Extra host opens up about his successes in the entertainment industry and “the heartbreaking mistakes” that still haunt him, including his highly public, and at times tumultuous, love life. In a release from his publisher Celebra, Lopez added, “There are no do-overs in life, so I had to learn to pick myself up and move forward, never forgetting the hard-won lessons. I’m thrilled to share my story in this memoir, to reveal the memories I’ve held close to my heart for the time.” This will be Lopez’s fourth book. [The Hollywood Reporter] READ FULL STORY

On The Books: Gillian Flynn takes a stab at writing comics

Gone Girl author Gillian Flynn takes a shot at writing a graphic short called “Masks,” and frankly, it’s a little terrifying. Illustrated by Dave Gibbons, the graphic story artist who drew Alan Moore’s Watchmen comic series, the comic is V for Vendetta except with masked moms who are exacting vigilante justice on high school bullies. In a masked frenzy, the well intentioned moms end up bludgeoning an innocent kid to death. This collaboration was part of a promotion for the upcoming comics exhibit at the British Library in London, so Flynn hasn’t forsaken her prose novels. But it would be cool if she got a taste for comics and did her next novel as a graphic! [Guardian]

Neil Gaiman is giving away free copies of Stardust on May 3rd! That got you excited right? Well, the fine print is that it’s only happening in Sainsbury’s, a UK grocery chain. Eff. When you pick up a copy of The Guardian in the grocery, you get a copy of Stardust to celebrate the paperback release of his newest book The Ocean at the End of the Lane. So Brits, get on that…and please send me one! [Guardian]

The Polish poet Tadeusz Różewicz passed away at 92. His poetry was deeply influenced by the European political turmoil of the 20th century: the insidious infiltration of fascism, the terrors of World War II, the rise and fall of the USSR. The Guardian reports that both he and his brother (also a poet) served in the Polish Underground, but his brother was killed by the Gestapo in 1944. His hard life led to his stripped down style of poetry, affecting and merciless. [Guardian]

I am an unabashed Celine Dion fan. Whether you love her or loathe her, Slate has an interesting essay by Mary Gaitskill, who wrote the story that became that movie Secretary (such a great flick). She picks apart why Dion is so polarizing (and it’s not because she’s Québécois!) and why our tastes in art can make us want to throttle artists sometimes. This is an excerpt from the upcoming book, Let’s Talk About Love: Why Other People Have Such Bad Taste. Need this. [Slate via NPR]

Rush over to The New Yorker because they have some new work by Rebecca Solnit! Solnit is both an avid environmental activist and a beautiful, philosphical writer. She’s written 16 books, including these amazing city guides where she layers old maps showing various forgotten and unusual aspects of city history, unfolding magical energy lines and mysteries. So far she’s done San Francisco and New Orleans. This essay in The New Yorker is an adaptation from her new collection Men Explain Things to Me. Brilliant title. [The New Yorker]

 

Max Brooks Q&A: See how 'The Harlem Hellfighters' earned their name

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In The Harlem Hellfighters, World War Z author Max Brooks resurrects the heroics of World War I’s mighty 369th U.S. Army Infantry Regiment. The titular all-black unit faced appalling bigotry: They were forced to train in hostile South Carolina, issued broomsticks instead of guns, and eventually dumped on the depleted French Army because the American Army had no intention of letting them fight side-by-side with white soldiers. Undaunted, they volunteered for the most dangerous assignments and soon became one of the most decorated — and feared — Allied fighting units.

Brooks, the 41-year-old son of Mel Brooks and the late Anne Bancroft, has been ruminating on this story for three decades. When his screenplay was repeatedly rejected, he partnered with artist Caanan White on a graphic novel instead. Less than 48 hours after the finished book made the rounds, Sony picked up the movie rights for producer Will Smith. Brooks dreams of a big-name cast like that of 1962’s WWII classic The Longest Day. But he’s also cautious. “Whether this movie gets made or whether it doesn’t, the book lives,” he says.

Click below for an extended chat with Brooks, as well as art from The Harlem Hellfighters, available April 1:

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Rainbow Rowell signs two-book deal with First Second -- EXCLUSIVE

It’s time to fangirl because Fangirl author Rainbow Rowell has signed a two-book deal with First Second. She’ll be writing two as-yet-untitled graphic novels which will be YA prose fiction, in the same vein as the aforementioned Fangirl and Printz Honor winner Eleanor & Park. The books were acquired for First Second by Senior Editor Calista Brill. Are you fangirling yet? Because we are.

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'World War Z's Max Brooks visits hell on Earth in 'Shadow Walk' -- EXCLUSIVE

“Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.” — Psalm 23

Max Brooks takes the fantastic extremely seriously. In 2003, he published The Zombie Survival Guide, a meticulously researched how-to manual to manage everyday life among the undead. Three years later, he wrote World War Z, an oral history that became the basis for Brad Pitt’s hit movie about the zombie apocalypse. So it’s no surprise that the author who treated zombies with a historian’s eye for detail had a somewhat similar approach to Shadow Walk, the new graphic novel he created with writer Mark Waid (Daredevil) and artist Shane Davis (Superman: Earth One). The Valley of the Shadow of Death is a Biblical reference, long assumed to be a metaphor, but Brooks was tasked to create a world where such a place really existed.

In Shadow Walk, a team of soldiers and academics are sent into a mysterious hell-hole that American grunts have stumbled upon while fighting in Iraq. Within its borders awaits one nightmare after another, and the crew is tested in every way: physically, mentally, spiritually.

Brooks checked in with EW before the book goes on sale on Wednesday, Nov. 27, to discuss how this collaboration came about, what he loved about working for Legendary Comics, and whether Shadow Walk has a future on the big screen. Click below for an interview and six exclusive pages of Shadow Walk. READ FULL STORY

See an excerpt from an excellent graphic novel version of 'Frankenstein'

If you want some Halloween scares, you might as well get them from a classic. Gris Grimly’s faithful yet original graphic novel update of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein contains Shelley’s original prose — wholly untouched — and Grimly’s signature haunting artwork, which has won praise from the likes of Guillermo del Toro. See below for a taste from the book: READ FULL STORY

'Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children: The Graphic Novel' gets a trailer -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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Most books as popular as Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children are eventually adapted into a film or television series. But even though the book’s film rights were almost immediately snapped up by Twentieth Century Fox, the first adaptation of Ransom Riggs’ debut YA novel won’t be one for the screen.

Instead, Hachette Book Group is set to release a graphic novel version of the story — wholly appropriate, given Miss Peregrine‘s whimsical imagery and the eery old-timey photos sprinkled throughout the novel. Catch a glimpse at the manga-style creepfest, illustrated by Cassandra Jean, in the exclusive trailer below.

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'Boxers & Saints': Gene Luen Yang talks East-West culture clash, plus a hidden gem of comic's Golden Age

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American Born Chinese writer and artist Gene Luen Yang is no stranger to adolescents grappling with big questions. But now he’s taking his insight for the humor, drama, and pain of young adulthood from history. His latest graphic novel Boxers & Saints follows the parallel tales of two Chinese teens who grow up through the Boxer Rebellion. The two-book collection, which hits shelves Sept. 10, views the early 20th century rebellion on both sides of the struggle, from the perspective of the Boxers and the Christian converts.

Yang, who also writes the Avatar: The Last Airbender series of graphic novels, spoke to EW about his latest ventures and how he needed a superhero-sized breather while tackling such a devastating and defining event.
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Check out an excerpt from the graphic novel epic 'Boxers & Saints' -- EXCLUSIVE

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In his first solo graphic novel since the National Book Award finalist American Born Chinese, writer and artist Gene Luen Yang takes on the often overlooked Boxer Rebellion and transforms history and legend to the page in the dual volume graphic novel, Boxers & Saints.

The two-book parallel narratives depict the late 19th century-early 20th century uprising in China through the eyes of two young characters, Little Bao and Four Girl/Vibiana. The first, Boxers, follows the journey of Little Bao, who leads a violent rebellion against the “foreign devils.” The second, Saints, tells the tale of Four Girl as she embraces the foreign religion Christianity as it offers her a sense of identity and self-acceptance.

Read on for an exclusive excerpt of the first book, Boxers, as Little Bao learns the “ritual” from Master Big Belly in order to invoke the power of the gods — in a style reminiscent of the power of Grayskull.

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