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Tag: Goodreads (1-9 of 9)

On the Books: R.L. Stine to revive 'Fear Street'; Arizona school district lifts book ban

Not a whole lot of books news today, folks — just a Halloween-appropriate announcement from Chief Scarer R.L. Stine, a lifted books ban in Arizona, and an ad campaign that’s both confusing and fascinating. Read on for today’s headlines:

R.L. Stine, the mastermind behind the Goosebumps books, is reviving the young adult horror series Fear Street. [The New York Times]

An Arizona school district has lifted its ban on seven Mexican-American studies books after a governing board voted 3-2 to reinstate them as “supplementary materials.” [Arizona Daily Star]

The ad campaign for the upcoming film adaptation of The Book Thief is intentionally left blank. The film’s ad took up two consecutive blank pages in The New York Times with only a URL listed at the bottom. [Adweek]

Larry Kirshbaum, head of Amazon Publishing, announced he’ll be stepping down early next year. [Publishers Weekly]

Speaking of Amazon (we’re always speaking of Amazon), a community of Goodreads users have been protesting Amazon’s new rules. [Salon]

The New York Times is doing a series of profiles of small poetry presses because “many smart people say they’re panic-stricken by poetry, as if it were an iambic migraine to be ducked.” [The New York Times]

Q&A of the day: Rosalind Wiseman introduced the term “mean girls” with Queen Bees & Wannabes. She has a new book coming out titled Masterminds & Wingmen and talked to USA Today about what’s going on in “Boy World.” [USA Today]

And for your must-read: What’s that word again? Liesl Schillinger’s new book, Wordbirds: An Irreverent Lexicon for the 21st Century, provides an updated list of terms for every situation, from “Facebook-happy” to “rotter.” [The New Yorker]

On the Books: Kelly Clarkson gives up Jane Austen's ring; Banned Books Week in full swing

Happy Banned Books Week! To celebrate, we’ve got some recommended banned books, a study on book censorship and a list of most frequently challenged books. In other news, what do Jane Austen and Kelly Clarkson have in common? Why is Paula Deen in today’s news roundup? The answers and more headlines below:

To start you off, here are five banned books Forbes says you should read. [Forbes]

None of those are children’s books, so if you want a dose of nostalgia, look no further than the American Library Association’s annual list of the “most frequently challenged” books, which found that Captain Underpants prompted the most complaints in libraries this year. [ALA]

The ALA, which organizes Banned Books Week, also found that book censors target teen fiction, a genre prone to topics about sex, drugs and suicide. [The Guardian]

Moving on to celebrity news, Kelly Clarkson was asked to leave a ring once owned by Jane Austen behind at the author’s museum. The singer had purchased the ring at an auction, but had no problem with the news, saying “The ring is a beautiful national treasure, and I am happy to know that so many Jane Austen fans will get to see it.” Looks like her life won’t suck without it. [The Guardian]

If you thought Paula Deen couldn’t get any more cartoonish, you thought wrong. The celebrity chef’s life story will be adapted into a comic book biography, Female Force: Paula Deen, by Bluewater Productions. [Forbes]

Meanwhile, Scholastic, the world’s largest publisher and distributor of children’s books, announced it will donate 1 million books to Reach Out and Read, a non-profit established for kids in poverty. [LA Times]

Online, the reading-based social network Goodreads is stirring up some controversy after announcing new reviewing guidelines, which will automatically delete reviews that focus on an author’s behavior rather than a book’s content. [GigaOM]

Eleanor Randolph of the New York Times is writing a biography of Michael Bloomberg that will be published by Simon & Schuster. According to the press release, the book will cover Bloomberg’s career as mayor of New York City for the past 12 years and his legacy as “a public figure of national significance.”

Finally, if you have some time to spare, head over to the New York Times for its profile of Elizabeth “Eat, Pray, Love” Gilbert, a fascinating read on the 44-year-old novelist’s career from being “one of the boys” at magazines like GQ to her image now, as an unwitting self-help guru with legions of female fans. [New York Times]

Summer books that Goodreads users are loving -- EXCLUSIVE

Red-Sparrow.jpg

Goodreads users — like most passionate readers — are an opinionated bunch, so it’s rare for them to come to a consensus about any book. But there are some summer books that are indisputable slam-dunks for the beach, the plane, or inside next to the air-conditioner. The data-crunchers at Goodreads have named for us the seven summer books that seem to be taking off with their readers, judging from stellar ratings and comments. Click through to get some suggestions!

Red Sparrow
by Jason Matthews
4.11 average rating
Learn the secrets of “sexpionage” as a trained seductress circles her prey, a young American spy, in this globe-trotting thriller penned by a former CIA officer. Goodreads member, Paul, says, “Excellent, one of the best spy novels I have read in a long, long time…there is not one dull moment in the entire book.”

NEXT: A Hundred Summers

Amazon acquires Goodreads

AMAZON-GOODREADS

Your favorite social reading experience is coming to Kindle.

Amazon.com announced today that it has reached an agreement to acquire Goodreads, a popular and social media-savvy book recommending site. Founded in 2007, Goodreads allows users to track books they want to read, read and write user reviews, and form book clubs. The aspect of seeing what your friends are reading — as opposed to strangers like with an Amazon review — is part of the appeal. Currently, the site has over 16 million members with over 30,000 books clubs.

“Amazon and Goodreads share a passion for reinventing reading,” said Russ Grandinetti, Amazon Vice President, Kindle Content in a press release. “Goodreads has helped change how we discover and discuss books and, with Kindle, Amazon has helped expand reading around the world. In addition, both Amazon and Goodreads have helped thousands of authors reach a wider audience and make a better living at their craft. Together we intend to build many new ways to delight readers and authors alike.” READ FULL STORY

Goodreads users select best books of 2012 -- FIRST LOOK

goodreads-winners

The annual Goodreads Choice Awards are basically the People’s Choice Awards of books. Users of the literary social network voted on their favorite books of the year in 20 categories, and this year, there were some surprises — J.K. Rowling’s The Casual Vacancy as best novel? — and some slam dunks (Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl for Best Mystery, John Green for Best Young Adult, and Cheryl Strayed’s Wild for Best Memoir). Once again, Veronica Roth proved that she’s pretty much unbeatable when it comes to reader-voted prizes, winning the Best Goodreads Author award for the first time and the Best Young Adult Fantasy award for the second time with Insurgent, sequel to Divergent.

The closest race occurred in Best Historical Fiction, with M.L. Stedman’s The Light Between Oceans narrowly beating out Man Booker-winner Bring up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel. J.K. Rowling’s first adult novel most likely benefited from a large and devoted fanbase, as Casual Vacancy only became a finalist due to write-in votes — its Goodreads user rating of 3.32 stars wasn’t originally high enough to qualify it — yet it won the biggest honor.

Susan Cain’s Nonfiction win for her best-seller Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking made me smile — partly because I could picture a bunch of Goodreads bookworms really relating to it, and also because introverts, a sizable but often ignored and misunderstood demographic, have had a big year in 2012 with the publication of Quiet, Sophia Dembling’s The Introvert’s Way, and a buzzed-about feature in The Atlantic.

See the entire list of winners below: READ FULL STORY

Flow Chart: What hipsters should read

Whether you’re a hipster, read like a hipster, or just enjoy making fun of hipsters, this flow chart by a Goodreads blogger is both instructive and hilarious. Hipsters, who are largely defined by their discerning tastes, have a lot of options here, although it’s completely accurate that any good hipster need go no further if he or she hasn’t read David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest (which must be one of the books people most often lie about having read). One major flaw, though, would be the omission of The Wind-up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami, but this infographic is definitely worth moseying through nevertheless: READ FULL STORY

Goodreads Choice Awards 2012 finalists announced

Beautiful-Ruins_510x317.jpg

Book nerds, you have some hard choices to make. The folks at Goodreads, the social networking hub for bibliophiles, have whittled down the field to 200 finalists — with 10 titles in 20 categories — for the Goodreads Choice Awards, voted on by Goodreads users.

In the Fiction category are some of the most beloved novels of the year, including Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walter, Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan, This Is How You Lose Her by Junot Diaz, The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker … and The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling? Rowling’s foray into adult fiction didn’t originally qualify for the long-list because it didn’t get the required 3.5-star user rating, but it earned enough write-in votes to become a finalist.

Another category to watch is Romance. E L James’ reps point to last year’s Goodreads Choice Awards as the tipping point that gave Fifty Shades of Grey a new level of recognition that eventually led to the phenomenon we all know about. Fifty Shades Freed goes up against Sylvia Day’s Bared to You and J.R. Ward’s Lover Reborn.

You can always count on Young Adult literature to generate enthusiastic online engagement. In the YA fiction category, the front-runner is certainly John Green’s wonderful novel The Fault in Our Stars. The #DFTBA movement should give him the win handily, although the dark horse might be Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein, which won a lot of fans this year. (It’s terrific). In the YA fantasy category, it’ll be a battle between Veronica Roth and Cassandra Clare to see whose extremely devoted followings will turn out in droves.

Go vote!

Follow @EWStephanLee on Twitter.

Read more:
See the new paperback cover of ‘The Age of Miracles’ by Karen Thompson Walker — EXCLUSIVE
And the 2012 National Book Award winners are …
National Book Award winner Katherine Boo on ‘Behind the Beautiful Forevers’, ‘unsexy’ topics, and ‘American Idol’ recaps

Republicans and Democrats read differently, according to a Goodreads infographic -- PHOTO

We’ll be subjected to election polling results nonstop until November, but here’s a different kind of stat: Goodreads has released an infographic analyzing the literary tastes of its users based on political party. Not all of the results are particularly shocking — Mitt Romney supporters are much more likely to read the best-selling Heaven Is For Real: A Little Boy’s Astounding Story of His Trip to Heaven and Back, which recounts Colton Burpo’s trip to meet God while undergoing an emergency appendectomy, and Republicans, as always, tend to love Ayn Rand. Interestingly, Obama supporters are harsher critics of books (and debate performances?) and are three times more likely to have read novels by Jonathan Franzen. Check out the full results below: READ FULL STORY

Goodreads list: 'Not Bestsellers Yet, but Readers Think They Should Be' -- EXCLUSIVE

Never-Fall-Down

Goodreads users — like most passionate readers — are an opinionated bunch, so it’s rare for them to come to a consensus about any book. But there are some under-the-radar titles that users of the literary social network widely agree are deserving of greater attention and acclaim. The editors at Goodreads have selected seven books that, according to user ratings and comments, should be on the verge of breaking out. Click through to learn more about these dark horses in the fiction, nonfiction, and young adult categories.

NEXT: A page-turner destined to become a classic?

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