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Tag: Gillian Flynn (1-10 of 11)

On the Books: Amazon reportedly opening its first brick-and-mortar store

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- Amazon is coming to Midtown. The The Wall Street Journal reports that the online giant is set to open its first brick-and-mortar store at 7 W. 34th St. in Manhattan, directly across the street from the Empire State Building. Herald Square, Madison Square Garden, Penn Station—major hubs for locals and tourists alike—are all a block or two away from the retailer-savvy location. In addition to the nearby stores (like the Macy’s flagship location, Forever 21, and H&M)—as well as a smartly timed opening just in time for the holiday shopping season—Amazon’s first serious venture into face-to-face consumer interaction is poised to bring in a lot of foot traffic. (They experimented with a popup Kindle shop in San Francisco last year.) In August, a peak number of about 6,000 people per hour passed in front of the H&M on the same block. Amazon has declined to comment on the story. [The Wall Street Journal]

- Girls actress and creator Lena Dunham is the kind of girl to top bestsellers lists with her debut book. Dunham’s collection of personal essays, is currently second on The New York Times bestsellers list for nonfiction, print and ebook sales combined—and No. 1 on the ebook-only nonfiction list. The book sold about 38,000 hardcovers in the week following its release on Sept. 30, according to Nielsen Bookscan (whose data covers approximately 85 percent of all book sales). READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Paperbacks and hardcovers still reign over ebooks

Early adopters of e-readers: The literary revolution still has not been digitized. In the first six months of 2014, ebook sales composed 23 percent of total book sales, according to new data from Nielsen Books. That’s certainly a hefty chunk, but even hardcovers alone beat out ebooks, making up 25 percent of unit purchases.

Not everyone buys ebooks at the same rates, though. Only 22 percent of adult nonfiction books purchased in the six-month period were ebooks, while a whopping 47 percent of romance novels purchased in the same span were digital. This could explain recent pushes by publishers to expand the ebook market, by offering titles by authors like Gabriel García Márquez and Charles Dickens. [Publishers Weekly]

One bestselling book in particular has had a big week. Thanks to its new film adaptation, Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl—which has spent 121 weeks on USA Today‘s bestseller list without claiming the top spot—should hit No. 1. The film topped its own charts in its debut weekend, raking in $38 million. [USA Today]

Jeff Kinney’s Diary of a Wimpy Kid series has been adapted for the silver screen, but a new trailer the author released promotes the next literary installment. Kinney plans to upload five teasers trailers for the ninth book in the series, The Long Haul, to YouTube before the book hits shelves on Nov. 4. [Mediabistro]

The comic series Naruto, published by Japan’s Shueisha Inc. in its weekly Shonen Jump magazine, will end in November after 15 years. Shueisha gave no reason for ending the series, which has proven massively popular. About an adolescent ninja’s struggles to become the strongest in his village, Naruto has spawned 70 comic book volumes, which have sold an estimated 205 million copies in 35 countries and regions. Naruto has also been adapted into an animated television series. [The Wall Street Journal]

More than 150 years after his death, Edgar Allan Poe’s hometown of Boston has erected a statue in his honor. Poe died 165 years ago Tuesday, but a monument was never a foregone conclusion. The author and poet had a contentious relationship with the city, complimenting the intentions of Bostonians but remarking that “their poetry is not so good… the Bostonians are well-bred—as very dull persons generally are.”

Still, Boston seems to have buried the hatchet after all these years, commissioning a life-size brass statue of Poe. Artist Stefanie Rocknack didn’t skimp on details: The statue, located in a downtown park, faces away from the Frog Pond to show Poe’s disdain for Bostonians, and the author’s image carries a raven and a briefcase containing a human heart, both references to his work.

Poe’s adopted hometown, Baltimore, has shown the author much more affection over the years, proudly displaying its own statue since 1921 and naming its NFL team after one of his famous poems. [L.A. Times]

Gillian Flynn to write updated version of 'Hamlet'

Who’s there? Why, it’s Gone Girl author Gillian Flynn with a new version of William Shakespeare’s Hamlet.

Flynn will write a novel based on Hamlet for Hogarth Shakespeare, as part of an international publishing initiative across the Penguin Random House Group that presents retellings of The Bard’s tales by some of today’s best-known writers.

Hamlet has long been a fascination of mine: murder, betrayal, revenge, deceit, madness — all my favorite things,” Flynn said in a press release. “Add to that some of Shakespeare’s most intriguing, curious characters — from the titular brooding prince to rueful Ophelia — and what (slightly cheeky) writer wouldn’t be tempted to reimagine it?” READ FULL STORY

On The Books: Gillian Flynn takes a stab at writing comics

Gone Girl author Gillian Flynn takes a shot at writing a graphic short called “Masks,” and frankly, it’s a little terrifying. Illustrated by Dave Gibbons, the graphic story artist who drew Alan Moore’s Watchmen comic series, the comic is V for Vendetta except with masked moms who are exacting vigilante justice on high school bullies. In a masked frenzy, the well intentioned moms end up bludgeoning an innocent kid to death. This collaboration was part of a promotion for the upcoming comics exhibit at the British Library in London, so Flynn hasn’t forsaken her prose novels. But it would be cool if she got a taste for comics and did her next novel as a graphic! [Guardian]

Neil Gaiman is giving away free copies of Stardust on May 3rd! That got you excited right? Well, the fine print is that it’s only happening in Sainsbury’s, a UK grocery chain. Eff. When you pick up a copy of The Guardian in the grocery, you get a copy of Stardust to celebrate the paperback release of his newest book The Ocean at the End of the Lane. So Brits, get on that…and please send me one! [Guardian]

The Polish poet Tadeusz Różewicz passed away at 92. His poetry was deeply influenced by the European political turmoil of the 20th century: the insidious infiltration of fascism, the terrors of World War II, the rise and fall of the USSR. The Guardian reports that both he and his brother (also a poet) served in the Polish Underground, but his brother was killed by the Gestapo in 1944. His hard life led to his stripped down style of poetry, affecting and merciless. [Guardian]

I am an unabashed Celine Dion fan. Whether you love her or loathe her, Slate has an interesting essay by Mary Gaitskill, who wrote the story that became that movie Secretary (such a great flick). She picks apart why Dion is so polarizing (and it’s not because she’s Québécois!) and why our tastes in art can make us want to throttle artists sometimes. This is an excerpt from the upcoming book, Let’s Talk About Love: Why Other People Have Such Bad Taste. Need this. [Slate via NPR]

Rush over to The New Yorker because they have some new work by Rebecca Solnit! Solnit is both an avid environmental activist and a beautiful, philosphical writer. She’s written 16 books, including these amazing city guides where she layers old maps showing various forgotten and unusual aspects of city history, unfolding magical energy lines and mysteries. So far she’s done San Francisco and New Orleans. This essay in The New Yorker is an adaptation from her new collection Men Explain Things to Me. Brilliant title. [The New Yorker]

 

On the Books: Norman Rockwell's family protests new biography for suggesting artist was gay; 'Gone Girl' paperback sale date announced

Members of Norman Rockwell’s family are protesting a American Mirror — a new biography of the artist by Deborah Solomon — over the book’s suggestions that he may have been secretly gay or had “pedophilic impulses.” The family members called the book “shocking” and said that Solomon’s aim for writing it was “publicity and financial gain and self-aggrandizement.” Solomon, however, said that the book is primarily about Rockwell’s work. “I feel like this is really the first book that convincingly makes the case for Rockwell’s artistic importance,” she told the New York Times, “and I would hope to keep the discussion on that subject.” [New York Times]

Random House has announced the paperback sale date for Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl: April 22, 2014, according to a press release. The novel spent 11 weeks at the top of the New York Times bestseller list and is being adapted into a film starring Ben Affleck, who spoke with EW about working with Flynn here.

The University of Oxford’s Bodleian Library and the Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana started a new digitization project, which, through a $3.2 million grant from the Polonsky Foundation, plans to provide “Hebrew manuscripts, Greek manuscripts, and incunabula, or 15th-century printed books” for free through the project’s website. [Polonsky Foundation Digitization Project]

Apple’s e-book antitrust case continues to stir up drama, as the company said in a court filing that its court-appointed monitor, Michael Bromwich, charged $1,100 an hour. The complaint states that “Mr. Bromwich has already shown a proclivity to leap far beyond his mandate, and now this Court proposes amendments that would give him power to interview Apple personnel ex parte, something he will no doubt be quick to exploit.”

Authors weren’t the only ones who swarmed to indie bookstores for Small Business Saturday over the weekend. President Obama and his daughters, Sasha and Malia, visited Politics and Prose in Washington, D.C. to choose some titles off its shelves. [Sacramento Bee]

Egyptian poet Ahmed Fouad Negm died at the age of 84. Negm was best known for his revolutionary work and criticism of political leaders, spending 18 years in jail for protesting Egyptian presidents including Hosni Mubarak. [The Telegraph]

Book publisher Andrew Schiffrin died at 78 in Paris on Sunday. Schiffrin was renowned for working with authors including Jean-Paul Sartre, Marguerite Duras, and Gunter Grass. [LA Times]

Why do our brains love lists? Why do readers prefer clicking on “listicles” instead of reading long form journalism, and yet, feel guilty about it afterward? Maria Konnikova explores this head-scratcher. [The New Yorker]

Lolita may belong to Vladimir Nabokov, but did Dorothy Parker’s “Lolita,” a story published in The New Yorker three weeks before Nabokov’s novel arrived in bookstores, rip off Nabokov’s story after seeing the manuscript early? [New York Magazine]

ICYMI: Fifty Shades of Grey has added a new cast member: singer Rita Ora. Check out the photos of the cast here.

See the new covers of 'Gone Girl' author Gillian Flynn's 'Sharp Objects' and 'Dark Places' — EXCLUSIVE

Gone Girl by former EW staffer Gillian Flynn might be the surprise runaway hit of 2012 — and it’s still killing it on the best-seller chart deep into 2013 — but it’s not her first rodeo. If you loved Gone Girl, you might want to check out her first two novels Sharp Objects and Dark Places, the film version of which will reportedly star Charlize Theron. Flynn’s previous books are certainly different from Gone Girl, but they carry some hallmarks that might seem familiar by now: heroines who are deeply screwed up but always engaging; bleak, low-skied Midwestern settings; smothering parental types; and, of course, sneaky, viperish twists.

Broadway Paperbacks is releasing new covers for Sharp Objects and Dark Places in early April, and they hew closer to the Gone Girl motif. Take an exclusive peek below! READ FULL STORY

Women's Prize for Fiction longlist announced

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The Women’s Prize for Fiction — formerly the Orange Prize before the telephone corporation withdrew its funding — has announced its 20 contenders out of 140 submissions. The wide-ranging longlist of female authors includes literary heavyweights like Zadie Smith and Barbara Kingsolver as well as newcomers Shani Boianjiu and Francesca Segal. It includes Bring Up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel, which EW named the best novel of 2012, as well as Sheila Heti’s How Should a Person Be?, which EW named one of the worst. See the full list below: READ FULL STORY

Best of 2012 (Behind the Scenes): Gillian Flynn on 'Gone Girl' twists -- 'It's fine with me if people don't like the ending'

Gillian Flynn, a former EW critic and current Entertainer of the Year, has had a dream 2012. Not only has her third novel Gone Girl been a giant critical and commercial success, it’s become part of the zeitgeist, stirring heated conversation. You can’t look at Gone Girl‘s Amazon page without reading endless rants about THAT ending. READ FULL STORY

Goodreads users select best books of 2012 -- FIRST LOOK

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The annual Goodreads Choice Awards are basically the People’s Choice Awards of books. Users of the literary social network voted on their favorite books of the year in 20 categories, and this year, there were some surprises — J.K. Rowling’s The Casual Vacancy as best novel? — and some slam dunks (Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl for Best Mystery, John Green for Best Young Adult, and Cheryl Strayed’s Wild for Best Memoir). Once again, Veronica Roth proved that she’s pretty much unbeatable when it comes to reader-voted prizes, winning the Best Goodreads Author award for the first time and the Best Young Adult Fantasy award for the second time with Insurgent, sequel to Divergent.

The closest race occurred in Best Historical Fiction, with M.L. Stedman’s The Light Between Oceans narrowly beating out Man Booker-winner Bring up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel. J.K. Rowling’s first adult novel most likely benefited from a large and devoted fanbase, as Casual Vacancy only became a finalist due to write-in votes — its Goodreads user rating of 3.32 stars wasn’t originally high enough to qualify it — yet it won the biggest honor.

Susan Cain’s Nonfiction win for her best-seller Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking made me smile — partly because I could picture a bunch of Goodreads bookworms really relating to it, and also because introverts, a sizable but often ignored and misunderstood demographic, have had a big year in 2012 with the publication of Quiet, Sophia Dembling’s The Introvert’s Way, and a buzzed-about feature in The Atlantic.

See the entire list of winners below: READ FULL STORY

'Gone Girl' author Gillian Flynn to write her first Young Adult novel

Gillian Flynn, best-selling author of 2012’s runaway hit of the summer Gone Girl and former Entertainment Weekly critic, will pen her first-ever young adult novel, to be published by Delacorte Press. In addition, Crown Publishing, a division of Random House, has signed her for a fourth adult novel, slated for 2015, and an additional novel for adults after that. Release dates for her fifth adult novel and her first young adult novel have not been disclosed. READ FULL STORY

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