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Tag: Film Adaptations (21-30 of 52)

'Gangster Squad' book still to be released Aug. 7

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EW reported just last week that Warner Bros, as an act of respect in the aftermath of the Aurora shooting tragedy, had moved quickly to push back the release date of its action-drama Gangster Squad from its original date of Sept. 7 back to Jan. 11, 2013.  The delay was implemented, above all else, to allow director Ruben Fleischer the time to edit out footage in which a group of men shoot up a movie theater from behind the screen (the now certainly insensitive massacre scene was included in the film’s original trailer, and you can catch a quick, fragmented snippet of it by clicking here).

The studio did not, however, act quite swiftly enough to stop the publication of a book by the same name, journalist Paul Lieberman’s Gangster Squad: Covert Cops, the Mob, and the Battle for Los Angeles.  The nonfiction work, which was used as source material for the film and whose cover features art from the motion picture, is still scheduled to hit shelves on its original release date of August 7th. READ FULL STORY

The latest in 'Fifty Shades of Grey' imitators

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Every day brings news of more and more projects hanging onto Fifty Shades of Grey‘s coattails (or cat o’nine tails).

You can’t blame any of the bandwagon-jumpers, though. E L James’ S&M trilogy is quickly joining the likes of Twilight and The Hunger Games in terms of sales, and Amazon UK has reported that the books have become the best-selling books in the website’s 14-year history, overtaking the Harry Potter series in just four months.

So here’s what’s going on in the world of Fifty Shades. READ FULL STORY

'The Twilight Saga: The Complete Film Archive' cover reveal! -- EXCLUSIVE

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For those of you anticipating Nov. 16th — the release of the final Twilight movie — with a mix of utmost dread and excitement, the good folks at Little, Brown will be releasing the definitive, lushly photographed tome to commemorate the record-breaking film series on Oct. 9. EW got the first peek at the cover and the scoop on what you can find inside — from the looks of it, you’ll have a hard time prying this must-have from a true Twihard’s cold, dead hands. Feast your eyes below! READ FULL STORY

See the cover of 'Beautiful Redemption' by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl -- EXCLUSIVE

Beautiful Creatures by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl is one of the strongest contenders to become the next big teen franchise. This best-selling South Carolina-set Southern Gothic series revolves around high schooler Ethan Wate, who falls in love with a girl who appears in his dreams. A major film adaptation is in the works with stars like Viola Davis and Emma Thompson attached, along with lesser-knowns Jack O’Connell and Alice Englert as the teen leads. The three installments so far — Beautiful Creatures, Beautiful Darkness, and Beautiful Chaos — have garnered positive reviews and gained a large following. The fourth novel Beautiful Redemption won’t be available until Oct. 23, but EW has the first peek at the cover below! READ FULL STORY

Reading the Oscars: 'Hugo' the book vs. the movie

Six out of the nine Best Picture Academy Award nominees this year were based on books: Hugo, War Horse, Moneyball, The Descendants, The Help, and Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close. Prior to the ceremony on Feb. 26, Shelf Life will read or re-read each of these books, in addition to a few others that inspired nominees in different categories, and do a side-by-side with the film version. Today, we’ll take a look at Hugo, which is nominated for 11 Oscars, including Best Adapted Screenplay. Spoilers ahead. READ FULL STORY

Who should star in a movie version of 'The Fault in Our Stars'?

Even though John Green’s 2005 novel Looking for Alaska never got made into a movie despite a few attempts, I feel more optimistic about his new best-seller The Fault in Our Stars actually reaching the big screen. The story of two teenagers with cancer falling in love, which was optioned last week by Fox 2000, has an amazing blend of humor and tragedy. And with his massive online following and strong sales, Green’s profile has risen considerably since 2005.

I never visualized actors while reading The Fault in Our Stars, but the kids playing the leads, Hazel and Augustus, would have a huge challenge ahead of them. They’d have to be funny, capable of rapid-fire verbal sparring, and at the same time, take their performances into heavy territory without falling into melodrama. They’d have to be the sort of kids who are a bit wise beyond their years but are still into into video games and America’s Next Top Model and nihilistic Dutch authors. READ FULL STORY

Reading the Oscars: The book and short story that inspired 'The Descendants'

Six out of the nine Best Picture Academy Award nominees announced this morning were based on books: Hugo, War Horse, Moneyball, The Descendants, The Help, and Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close. Between now and the ceremony on Feb. 26, Shelf Life will read or re-read each of these books, in addition to a few others that inspired nominees in different categories, and do a side-by-side with the film version. For our first installment, we’ll take a look at The Descendants, which is nominated for five Oscars, including Best Adapted Screenplay. Minor spoilers ahead. READ FULL STORY

Film rights for 'Daughter of Smoke & Bone' acquired by Universal Pictures -- EXCLUSIVE

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Will Daughter of Smoke & Bone by Laini Taylor become the next huge books-to-movies franchise? It took a huge step toward that rarefied status today when Universal Pictures announced that it has acquired worldwide rights to the young adult fantasy novel, EW has learned exclusively.

Taylor’s thrilling, fresh novel — the first in a trilogy — centers on a young blue-haired girl named Karou who encounters unusual creatures and dangerous angels as she travels the world to carry out mysterious errands. EW’s Sara Vilkomerson wrote, “This smartly plotted, surprising, and fiercely compelling read will hook you from its opening pages. … Seriously, cancel all plans once you begin; you won’t want to put it down.” Daughter has made several major year-end lists: It was the sole young adult title in Amazon’s top 10 best books of 2011, and the New York Times named it one of five notable young adult books of the year. READ FULL STORY

'My Week with Marilyn': How the book stacks up to the movie

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Marilyn Monroe was such a big star at her height that one young man’s brief encounters with her spawned not one but two memoirs, which in turn inspired a feature film that’s currently generating Oscar buzz. The two books by the late Colin Clark both document the author’s experiences at the age of 23 as the third assistant director — or really, as an errand boy — on the conflict-ridden, six-month-long shoot of The Prince and the Showgirl starring Monroe and Laurence Olivier. His first book about the shoot, The Prince, the Showgirl, and Me (1995), consists of his day-to-day, fly-on-the-wall journals of his on-set observations. The second book, My Week With Marilyn (2000), takes a deeper look at a magical nine-day period (mentioned just briefly in the first book) in the middle of that six months in which Monroe lured Clark into a semi-romantic affair. While the two books — published only five years apart — take a markedly different stance on Monroe as a person and an actress, My Week With Marilyn the movie, as the title would suggest, adheres very closely to the book of the same name, although it draws some expository details from the first book as well. Weinstein Books, the publishing arm of the studio that produced the film, has released the two books in one volume for the first time. Whether you have or haven’t seen the movie, is the book worth reading? (Minor spoilers ahead). READ FULL STORY

'Moneyball': Love the movie? Read the book by Michael Lewis

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Even if you already saw and loved Moneyball this weekend, it’s still worth your time to read the book by author and financial journalist Michael Lewis. The movie does a great job constructing a narrative from what appears, on first glance, to be a somewhat un-cinematic story, but the source material drives home some of the thematic points in ways that the movie can’t. Reading the book after the movie doesn’t feel like a retread, but rather a closer look at Billy Beane (played by Brad Pitt) and his Oakland A’s.

People who, like myself, hate baseball will be surprised by how much there is to enjoy in this book (see also: The Art of Fielding). Moneyball isn’t just about baseball; it’s about baseball statistics. On the surface, there’s no worse hell imaginable than having to stare at a page of player facts and figures (I just had to remind myself via Google what “RBI” stands for), but it’s a testament to Lewis’ reporting and writing that the chapter I found most riveting, even inspiring, was about Bill James, the Baseball Abstract author and statistician who inspired Beane’s seemingly counter-intuitive player recruiting philosophy. READ FULL STORY

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