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Tag: Film Adaptations (1-10 of 48)

'Hi doggie!': Hear 'The Room' star Greg Sestero read from his memoir -- EXCLUSIVE AUDIOBOOK EXCERPT

When Entertainment Weekly first spoke to actor Greg Sestero back in 2008 the cult which surrounded his film The Room was still a small, mostly Los Angeles-based affair. Six years on, director-writer-star Tommy Wiseau’s fantastically awful film has become famous around the world and Sestero’s recent memoir The Disaster Artist – which concerns both the film’s production and his friendship with Wiseau — has been optioned by James Franco. READ FULL STORY

David Foster Wallace's estate opposes biopic 'The End of the Tour'

Relatives of David Foster Wallace say they’re opposed to the upcoming film The End of the Tour, which is based on David Lipsky’s 2010 book Although Of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip with David Foster Wallace.

In his book, Lipsky recounts accompanying Wallace, the author best known for his 1996 novel Infinite Jest, on his book tour.

Production on The End of the Tour, written by Donald Margulies, directed by James Ponsoldt (The Spectacular Now), and starring Jason Segel as Wallace and Jesse Eisenberg as Lipsky, wrapped in late March.

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On The Books: Laura Hillenbrand rewrote 'Unbroken' as a YA book

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Laura Hillenbrand has rewritten her best-seller Unbroken, the life story of Olympic runner Louie Zamperini, as a YA nonfiction book that will be published on Veterans Day (Nov. 11, 2014). The original Unbroken tells the tale of Zamperini’s Odysseian journey from a hard-scrabble kid in Southern California during the Depression to his meteoric rise as an Olympic runner in the 1936 Berlin Games. Later he signed up as a fighter pilot during World War II and flew planes in the South Pacific. His bomber crashed 850 miles off the coast of Hawaii and he spent 47 days stranded on a raft before being captured by the Japanese and brutally abused in a POW camp until the end up the war. But it’s not a downer! He perseveres and with the same buoyant spirit that carried him to the Olympics, he recovers from his wartime experiences and finds new life for himself.

I’m not sure why this needs a “YA” version. It sounds pretty appropriate for the 12+ ages of the “young adult” genre. Surely if you can be conscripted to read Lord of the Flies at 13, you can read this amazing real-life tale of the triumph of human spirit. Hillenbrand didn’t say specifically what she changed for the younger version, only that “Louie Zamperini’s story is spellbinding to people of every age. At the urging of librarians, teachers, and parents, I’ve created this edition specifically for younger readers. I’m delighted to bring Louie’s inspiring, exhilarating story to a new generation.” Since its original publication in November 2010, Unbroken has sold nearly 4 million copies and has remained on the bestseller list for over 160 weeks, with 14 weeks at #1. Angelina Jolie is directing a film adaptation (written by the Cohen brothers no less!) which is set for release on Christmas Day 2014.

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Tina Fey and Jason Bateman to headline 'This Is Where I Leave You' BookCon panel -- EXCLUSIVE

Reasons to get excited about this spring’s first annual BookCon, which is sort of like Comic-Con, but for, uh, actual books:

1. Panel headliners include Amy Poehler, Martin Short, R.L. Stine, Stan Lee, and Cassandra Clare.

2. EW can exclusively announce that Tina Fey and Jason Bateman will also headline a panel, which will serve as BookCon’s kickoff celebration.

3. Tina Fey!!!

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On The Books: Grasshopper Jungle might be a movie

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Hollywood hasn’t finished with the story trend of teens struggling to find their identity in a post-apocalyptic dystopia yet.  The most recent YA novel to get snatched up by movie executives is Grasshopper Jungle, which was just optioned by Sony. Scott Rosenberg (Con Air, Beautiful Girls, High Fidelity) plans to adapt the script. The novel is about a 16-year-old boy who inadvertently unleashes a plague of insects that turn the populace into mindless super-soldiers looking to eat, have sex and kill things — basically a bizarre take on the Pandora’s Box myth. Apparently author Andrew Smith carries it off with some verve though because we gave it an A- in our review. Movie-wise, I’d say this would come in around Planet of the Apes mixed with 28 Days Later and multiplied by that Buffy the Vampire Slayer episode, “Teachers Pet.” Can’t wait.

A new campaign called Let Books Be Books aims to end gender bias in the presentation of children’s books. They’re calling for publishers to remove “for boys” and “for girls” labels from kids books, as well as make the covers more gender neutral. This idea has been swirling for a long time, but it seems to be gaining more momentum recently…or maybe I’m just thinking of that amazing GoldieBox commercial for girl’s toys. [Guardian]

On that note, there’s a great essay by Anna Holmes in The New Yorker called “How to be a Good Bad American Girl.” Holmes looks at the legacy of troublesome little girls in American literature, specifically Harriet the Spy and To Kill A Mockingbird. “Harper Lee and Louise Fitzhugh taught their readers that difference, nonconformity, and even subversion should be celebrated in young girls,” she writes. “These qualities are the prerequisites for, and not the enemies of, creativity, curiosity, and insight.” [New Yorker]

The longlist of 20 nominees for the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction was just announced today. Lots of great women made the cut. I don’t envy the judges’ job of narrowing this down to a winner for June, 4th. Check out the nominees below.

  • Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Americanah
  • Margaret Atwood, MaddAddam
  • Suzanne Berne, The Dogs of Littlefield
  • Fatima Bhutto, The Shadow of the Crescent Moon
  • Claire Cameron, The Bear
  • Lea Carpenter, Eleven Days
  • M.J. Carter, The Strangler Vine
  • Eleanor Catton, The Luminaries
  • Deborah Kay Davies, Reasons She Goes to the Woods
  • Elizabeth Gilbert, The Signature of All Things
  • Hannah Kent, Burial Rites
  • Rachel Kushner, The Flamethrowers
  • Jhumpa Lahiri, The Lowland
  • Audrey Magee, The Undertaking
  • Eimear McBride, A Girl Is A Half-Formed Thing
  • Charlotte Mendelson, Almost English
  • Anna Quindlen, Still Life with Bread Crumbs
  • Elizabeth Strout, The Burgess Boys
  • Donna Tartt, The Goldfinch
  • Evie Wyld, All The Birds, Singing

New Hollywood: John Green talks 'Fault in Our Stars' movie and his meeting with Obama

Including John Green in our New Hollywood issue was a no-brainer. Although a movie adaptation of his first novel Looking For Alaska never got off the ground, the upcoming big-screen version of his latest best-seller The Fault in Our Stars, starring Shailene Woodley and Ansel Elgort, has millions of Green’s fans in anticipation. Green talked to EW about his hopes for the film and his life sinces the publication of TFIOS. READ FULL STORY

'Star Trek': Life after Khan begins with IDW's 'After Darkness'

Image credit: IDW Publishing

The “new” mythology of Starfleet began with the brand-reviving J.J. Abrams film Star Trek in 2009 and extended with Star Trek Into Darkness  this summer, but the canon is not limited to those silver screen cornerstones – the events chronicled in the Paramount videogame  also “count as canon” (as Trek producer and writer Roberto Orci has pointed out on many occasions) as do the events in the Star Trek comic books from IDW Publishing, the fourth largest comic book publisher in America (since 2011) and a brand that just posted the best market-share month in its 14-year history.

Issue No. 22 of the IDW Trek series arrives this week at stores and, as the After Darkness title suggests, it takes the story beyond the events depicted in Star Trek Into Darkness and, in doing so, becomes the first official Trek tale in any medium to take the story baton past the most recent film’s Khan story.

And (with Orci’s guidance as the creative consultant on the comics series) it may hint about the priorities for the next cinematic mission. To learn more about the spirit of the IDW series, we mind-melded with writer Mike Johnson (who is teamed with artist Erfan Fajar on story pages and the gifted Tim Bradstreet on select covers) to find out if he’s in Federation space or out of his Vulcan mind.
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'Mortal Instruments' movie tie-in editions: See all three! -- EXCLUSIVE

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For Shadowhunters desperate for more Mortal Instruments, Simon & Schuster has plenty of movie tie-ins and extras to tide you over until the movie version of Cassandra Clare’s best-seller The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones hits theaters Aug. 23. July 9 brings three new titles releasing simultaneously: The Official Illustrated Companion, Shadowhunter’s Guide, and the City of Bones Movie Tie-in Edition. EW has the exclusive first look at each of these giftables below. Get ready for a whole lot of demons, leather, and runes. READ FULL STORY

See the new paperback cover of 'The Age of Miracles' by Karen Thompson Walker -- EXCLUSIVE

Karen Thompson Walker has had an earth-shaking year in 2012. A former book editor herself, Walker’s first novel The Age of Miracles debuted to excellent reviews (including an A– grade from EW) and will likely make it onto several year-end best lists. The novel follows an 11-year-old narrator named Julia, who comes to terms with a subtle but disastrous apocalyptic event: The world’s rotation on its axis has slowed down; days have gotten longer, which leads to all sorts of disturbing changes, both on a global scale and in deeply personal ways for Julia. The paperback edition comes out Jan. 15, and we have an exclusive look at the new cover below. Plus, Walker talks about her big year and gives an update on the possible movie adapation. READ FULL STORY

Cassandra Clare talks 'Mortal Instruments' movie and teases her other series

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The bad news: the film adaptation of Cassandra Clare’s The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones doesn’t hit theaters until Aug. 23. (That’s 284 days away, but it’s not like I’m counting or anything.) The good news: Clare spoke with me about the movie for the new issue of EW on stands this Friday. You’ll have to wait until the end of the week for the first look, but read on for the rest of my chat with Clare. If it’s any consolation, Clare says she is just as eager as fans to see City of Bones. Here she talks about being involved in her first movie, and teases the next installments of The Mortal Instruments and The Infernal Devices. Check it out after the jump.

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