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Tag: Fifty Shades of Grey (1-10 of 41)

One Direction fanfic author gets book deal

If you’re not writing explicit fan fiction about your favorite boy band, do you really love them at all?

Harry Styles-inspired fanfic After, by 25-year-old One Direction fan Anna Todd, has inked a three-book deal. Simon & Schuster acquired the series with a deal in the “mid-six figures,” according to Publisher’s Weekly. They also grabbed the story’s “world and audio rights,” meaning that spinoffs are possible as well — and movie rights are in the works.

After, published on the fanfic site Wattpad, has hundreds of millions of reads. (Publisher’s Weekly says 800 million; a counter on the site puts the number at a still-impressive 194,999,570.) The story summary: “Tessa Young is an 18 year old college student with a simple life, excellent grades, and a sweet boyfriend. She always has things planned out ahead of time, until she meets a rude boy named Harry, with too many tattoos and piercings who shatters her plans.” Other One Direction members, such as Niall and Zayn, show up in the story as college frat guys. READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Winnie the Pooh is Britain's best-loved children's book

Winnie the Pooh tops a recent poll of Britain’s best-loved children’s books from the past 150 years. Oddly enough, neither JK Rowling’s nor Philip Pullman’s books made the list — maybe different Harry Potter books split the vote? Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, which just barely made the date cutoff, landed at number two, followed by The Very Hungry CaterpillarThe Hobbit, and The Gruffalo. [The Telegraph]
READ FULL STORY

On The Books: Hachette Amazon feud escalates, affecting Rowling and Connelly

The feud between Hachette Book Group and Amazon has intensified. The Los Angeles Times reports that Amazon has taken the pre-order buttons off of big Hachette titles, like The Burning Room by Michael Connelly and The Silkworm by Richard Galbraith, the pen name for J.K. Rowling. This is in addition to allegedly extending back order times for popular books, like Tina Fey’s Bossypants and Malcolm Gladwell’s The Tipping Point. Hachette has issued a statement saying they are “sparing no effort and exploring all options” to resolve this conflict, but Amazon has declined to comment. Hachette author James Patterson has been very outspoken about this battle. “What I don’t understand about this particular battle tactic is how it is in the best interest of Amazon customers,” he wrote on his Facebook page. “It certainly doesn’t appear to be in the best interest of authors.” READ FULL STORY

Sales for 'Fifty Shades of Grey' trilogy reach 100M copies

Fifty Shades of Grey has joined the 100 million club.

Vintage Books announced Wednesday that sales for E L James’ sexually explicit trilogy have reached 100 million copies and have spent 100 weeks on The New York Times‘ paperback best-seller list. The novels have been translated into 51 languages, including Hebrew, Icelandic and Korean. With a film adaptation planned for 2015, many more sales are likely.

James’ books, which originated as fan fiction inspired by Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight books, immediately topped best-seller lists after Vintage acquired them in 2012. Vintage is an imprint of Penguin Random House.

On the Books: Amazon updates Kindle, Fire OS; authors Karen Russell, Donald Antrim receive $625,000 MacArthur grants

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What’s Amazon’s latest for the Kindle? Who received the MacArthur “genius” grants this year? Those books headlines and more questions for you to ponder below:

Amazon announced new Kindle tablets — the 7″ Kindle Fire HDX — will begin shipping October 18. The company will also release an updated Fire OS, dubbed “Mojito,” which includes new features like Second Screen and the Mayday button. [AllThingsD]

Authors Karen Russell and Donald Antrim are among 24 MacArthur “genius” fellows, each receiving $625,000 from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation to use however they like. [NPR]

In other awards news, poet Alice Oswald won the 2013 Warwick Prize for Memorial, her retelling of Homer. [The Telegraph]

William Boyd, author of the latest James Bond novel, says Bond Girls should be called “Bond Women.” Discuss. [The Telegraph]

Also up for discussion: Do fictional characters have to be likable for us to fall in love with them? Writers Mohsin Hamid and Zoe Heller tackle the question. [New York Times]

Speaking of formerly likable fictional characters, Walter White’s Walt Whitman book from Breaking Bad is up for auction. [LA Times]

Paris Review co-founder and novelist Peter Matthiessen’s book, In Paradise, about a group of people who “come together for a weeklong meditation retreat at the site of a World War II concentration camp,” will be published by Riverhead Books this spring, according to a press release.

No need to blush, romance novel readers. A study found that fans of romance novels are more sensitive, meaning they’re more capable of “reading subtle facial cues, and picking up on the emotions they express.” (And on a related note, ICYMI: E.L. James is producing a line of wines inspired by Fifty Shades of Grey.) [Pacific Standard]

Finally, are you keeping up with Banned Books Week? Join its Twitter party at noon with the hashtag #bannedbooksweek, and check out some other events on their site. [Banned Books Week]

'Fifty Shades of Chicken' publishers to release 'Walking Dead' parody cookbook

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The zombie apocalypse may be looming after all: The monster fad is about to invade your kitchen.

From the publishers of Fifty Shades of Chicken comes The Snacking Dead (Oct. 29) a parody-within-a-cookbook featuring recipes and food photography of 50 eerily delicious finger foods. Not only is the recipe book stuffed with snack ideas such as Guac and Load Guacamole, Sticky Ribs, and Cold-Blooded Ice Cream Sandwiches, it also shares tips for cooking in tricky and direful situations and features a zombie story in addition to the photos and snacks.

This exclusive cover art may look more gruesome than appetizing. But if the walking dead do ever plague the world, some snacking secrets may come in handy so you don’t become one yourself.

The Snacking Dead by D.B. Walker (see what they did there?) is on sale this October.

Sex sells: Online retailers rake in profits with dirty e-books

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Minds might be in the gutter, but the sales of dirty e-books certainly are not. Book-selling powerhouses such as Amazon and Barnes & Noble are raking in major profits from the sleazier online titles and genres that readers can absorb behind the privacy of tablet screens.

In 2012, romance and erotica topped revenue charts with $1.4 billion in sales. However, the profit tactic has left the book retailers in one of those Fifty Shades of Grey areas. Despite the revenue benefits of the taboo genre, Amazon and B&N appear to be on the fence themselves in regards to the promotion of erotic fiction. A 2010 pedophilia guide sold on Amazon finally got pulled by the online retailer after the illicit subject matter sparked controversy. But in lieu of the book’s eventual removal from the site, Amazon released a statement shortly after defending its decision to offer the item:

Amazon believes it is censorship not to sell certain books simply because we or others believe their message is objectionable. Amazon does not support or promote hatred or criminal acts, however, we do support the right of every individual to make their own purchasing decisions.

The economics of erotica have never been a real question: sex sells. And maybe 50 Shades of Grey is to blame—the 2011 novel featuring a naive college graduate’s relationship with a BDSM-obsessed business mogul—as it sparked a more recent wildfire-like spread of naughty fiction fascination. But the levels of provocative seem to go way beyond the bondage/dominatrix realm; Amazon keyword searches reach the furthest ends of the sexual spectrum, including pedophilia, bestiality, and incest.

Although successful sales numbers might help disputable titles avoid a ban, they do not overpower the decision-making ultimately determined by retailer representatives. Both Amazon and B&N have appeared to strip their bestseller lists of several erotica books. As an alternative, erotic novels with warranting sales can appear in the top 100 online, a B&N spokeswoman told the New York Post.

Alexandria, Va. tops Amazon's list of well-read cities

The most well-read cities in the country may surprise you.

According to the third-annual survey conducted by Amazon.com, the most well-read city in the country is Alexandria, Virginia. Fitting that it is name for an ancient city with the most famous library in the world, right?

Well, not exactly — it isn’t the classics that are boosting Alexandria’s readership. According to Amazon, ranking is based on sales of books, magazines, and newspapers — in print and for Kindle. The top selling book was Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn. Romance novels like E L James’ Fifty Shades of Grey contributed greatly to sales in two-time list-topper Alexandria, and this year’s number two city, Knoxville, Tennessee.

Knoxville made a jump from the number 12 spot to number two this year, in large part due to sales of Fifty Shades of Grey. Vancouver, Washington, Dayton, Ohio, Clearwater, Florida and Tallahassee, Florida are on the list for the first time this year.

See the top 20 here.

'Fifty Shades of Grey' flagged by library list of 'challenged books'

Here’s a list Fifty Shades of Grey was destined to make: The books most likely to be removed from school and library shelves.

On Monday, E L James’ multimillion selling erotic trilogy placed No. 4 on the American Library Association’s annual study of “challenged books,” works subject to complaints from parents, educators and other members of the public. The objections: Offensive language, and, of course, graphic sexual content.

No. 1 was a not a story of the bedroom, but the bathroom, Dav Pilkey’s Captain Underpants books (Offensive language, unsuited for age group), followed by Sherman Alexie’s prize-winning The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian (Offensive language, racism, sexually explicit), and Jay Asher’s Thirteen Reasons Why (Drugs/alcohol/smoking, sexually explicit, suicide). Also on the list, at No. 10, Nobel laureate Toni Morrison’s Beloved (Sexually explicit, religious viewpoint, violence).

“It’s pretty exciting to be on a list that frequently features Mark Twain, Harper Lee, and Maya Angelou,” Pilkey said in a statement. “But I worry that some parents might see this list and discourage their kids from reading Captain Underpants, even though they have not had a chance to read the books themselves.” READ FULL STORY

Read an exclusive excerpt from 'Beautiful Stranger,' the follow-up to the steamy 'Twilight' fanfic 'Beautiful Bastard'

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“I have a strong urge to devour you.”

That’s one of the tamer lines from the prologue to Christina Lauren’s Beautiful Stranger, a companion novel to the deliciously steamy Beautiful Bastard. For those of you who can stand the heat (and trust me, it gets hot!), we’ve got an exclusive first look at the follow-up below.

Beautiful Stranger centers on Sara Dillon, a finance whiz who ditches her philandering boyfriend and moves to New York for a new start. There, she meets Max Stella, the ravishing British playboy with big hands and a fetish for naughty photographs, and what was supposed to be a one-night stand develops into a full-fledged fling (translation: they have a lot of sex). Oh, and just in case you were wondering about Miss Mills and Mr. Ryan, they put in an appearance too (but not in that way!). So if you like your hook-ups early and plentiful (as opposed to 40% of the way in, like another popular erotic fanfic), check out the prologue to Beautiful Stranger: READ FULL STORY

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