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Tag: Fiction (81-90 of 304)

And the 2012 National Book Award winners are ...

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The 2012 National Book Award winners were announced tonight during a blacktie gala at Cipriani’s in Lower Manhattan. Winning the big fiction prize was Louise Erdrich for her gut-wrenching novel The Round House, which centers on a grave injustice that rocks a Native American community. In a turn that didn’t surprise us whatsoever, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Katherine Boo won for her stunning work of nonfiction, Behind the Beautiful Forevers. David Ferry and William Alexander also won big in Poetry and Young People’s Literature, respectively. See below for a full list of finalists with winners in bold, and click on links for the EW reviews. READ FULL STORY

See the new paperback cover of 'The Age of Miracles' by Karen Thompson Walker -- EXCLUSIVE

Karen Thompson Walker has had an earth-shaking year in 2012. A former book editor herself, Walker’s first novel The Age of Miracles debuted to excellent reviews (including an A– grade from EW) and will likely make it onto several year-end best lists. The novel follows an 11-year-old narrator named Julia, who comes to terms with a subtle but disastrous apocalyptic event: The world’s rotation on its axis has slowed down; days have gotten longer, which leads to all sorts of disturbing changes, both on a global scale and in deeply personal ways for Julia. The paperback edition comes out Jan. 15, and we have an exclusive look at the new cover below. Plus, Walker talks about her big year and gives an update on the possible movie adapation. READ FULL STORY

Ann M. Martin picks her top 10 'Baby-sitters' books

What’s the secret to The Baby-sitters Club‘s phenomenal success? According to Scholastic editorial director David Levithan — who began working on the series as a 19-year-old Scholastic intern — it’s simple: “Girls have always connected with The Baby-sitters Club [because] they feel it’s real. It’s not amped up, action-packed drama or mythology or something that has no bearing on their lives,” he says. “And reading the books now, it’s amazing how relatable it all still is.”

Levithan is right. Any girl — any person, for that matter — can empathize with the struggles BSC members faced, from dealing with divorce to experiencing your first major crush. Relive all of middle-school’s trials, tribulations, and triumphs throughout the following pages, in which author Ann M. Martin selects her favorite titles from the 20 BSC books that are getting an electronic re-release in December. Martin has also added personal commentary about each of her picks, which are accompanied by their classic cover illustrations. You want side ponytails? We’ve got your side ponytails right here.

So, which books made the cut? Find out below!

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Say hello to your friends! 'The Baby-sitters Club' gets an e-book rerelease -- EXCLUSIVE

This is so dibble, you guys.

Scholastic is announcing today that the first 20 books in the bestselling Baby-Sitters Club series will be rereleased in ebook form beginning Dec. 1. Each title will feature a classic cover illustration by Hodges Soileau, the artist who illustrated dozens of BSC novels. Additionally, the series’ Facebook page is debuting a new Facebook app, which will allow fans to preview new ebooks, see nostalgic memorabilia, and take quizzes — then retake those quizzes upon learning that the BSC member they’re most similar to is Mallory.

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Author Jami Attenberg on 'The Middlesteins'

Jami Attenberg, author of The Kept Man and The Melting Season, has experienced a breakthrough of sorts with her latest novel The Middlesteins, which has reached No. 25 on the hardcover fiction best-seller list and is one of Amazon’s picks for best books of the year. Set in a Chicago suburb, the novel tracks the effect Edie Middlestein’s food obsession has on the rest of her family. As Edie’s health deteriorates, her husband of almost 40 years leaves her, placing the burden on their seething daughter Robin, their good-natured son Benny, and his tightly wound wife Rachelle. Attenberg took the time to talk to EW about food addiction and family in The Middlesteins, as well as her career reinvention. READ FULL STORY

Publishers Weekly picks top 10 books of 2012

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It’s barely November and top 10 of 2012 lists are already cropping up. We’ll be naming EW’s favorite books of year shortly, but check out Publishers Weekly‘s list now in case you you’re looking for some early holiday gift suggestions. Their picks range from an ambitious experiment in graphic novel form to an award-winning historical novel to a deep dive into America’s colonial era. See the full list below: READ FULL STORY

Halloween: Scary book picks from EW staffers

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Though no zombie or Kim Kardashian costume could be more frightening than Hurricane Sandy, a terrifying book can give you a dose of fun-scary before Halloween. I asked some of my esteemed colleagues at EW to name some of the books that gave them nightmares. Of course, some old standbys came up, including some by horror master Stephen King, but others were a little unexpected.

Click through for some bone-chilling recommendations!

FIRST UP: Books editor Tina Jordan chooses a novel by the author of “The Lottery”

'Kite Runner' author Khaled Hosseini to publish a new book

Khaled Hosseini, the best-selling author of The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns, will publish a new novel on May 21, 2013.

And the Mountains Roared (Riverhead) will be Hosseini’s first new book in six years. He said in a statement, “I am forever drawn to family as a recurring central theme of my writing. My earlier novels were, at heart, tales of fatherhood and motherhood. My new novel is a multigenerational-family story as well, this time revolving around brothers and sisters, and the ways in which they love, wound, betray, honor, and sacrifice for each other.”

Over 10 million copies of The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns have been sold in the United States, and over 38 million copies of both books have been sold worldwide in over seventy countries.

Follow @EWStephanLee on Twitter.

Read more:
Will Schwalbe discusses his affecting new memoir ‘The End of Your Life Book Club’
EW Review: THE KITE RUNNER
EW Review: A Thousand Splendid Suns

Drop your forks, ladies -- 'Sad Desk Salad' author Jessica Grose has something new to chew on

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Getting paid to sit around in your pajamas and write mean things about strangers on the Internet — sounds easy, right? But as Jessica Grose proves in her new novel, professional blogging is much more grueling (and even less glamorous) than it seems.

For Sad Desk Salad protagonist Alex Lyons, working for a popular women’s website is one third dream job, two thirds nightmare. She spends 12 hours a day writing posts that hit a nerve — at the cost of rarely seeing daylight, constantly being insulted by anonymous commenters, and never quite knowing how secure her job is. Things get more complicated when Alex receives a salacious video from an unnamed source. Posting it could make her career — or destroy her last shred of integrity.

Though the book is fiction, it contains more than a kernel of truth: Grose has worked as an editor at both Jezebel and Slate’s DoubleX vertical. (I interned at Slate when Grose worked there, though we rarely interacted.) Shortly after Sad Desk Salad hit shelves, I called Grose to chat about working online, the perils of privacy in the Internet age, and the best way for a blogger to keep her sanity. Hint: It involves avoiding Google.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Why did you decide to write a novel?
JESSICA GROSE:
Well, I had been seeing the issues that I deal with in the novel — privacy, and how journalists are navigating new media — for at least the past five years. I really wanted to talk about those issues, but I didn’t want to do it in a serious way — if I did it as nonfiction, I’d have to take a stand. And I think it’s such an ambiguous, complicated issue; it would be much more interesting to weave those conflicts into a fictional narrative. Also, I wanted to have a little fun. [laughs] I actually started writing it just to entertain myself, which sounds goofy.

How did you come up with the title?
There’s actually a very new media explanation.

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Hear a snippet from 'Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore' -- EXCLUSIVE

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Robin Sloan’s buzzy, inventive debut tells the story of Clay Jannon, a former Silicon Valley tech guy who starts work at a mysterious bookstore and then embarks on an unusual quest to crack a 15-century code. Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore ingeniously novelizes the ongoing divide between digital publishing and good old-fashioned cellulose books, and it’s also a funny, twisty page-turner that combines several sub-genres (read EW’s review). Check out a 10-minute excerpt of the audiobook below — as a bonus, Sloan himself makes a cameo as the audiobook narrator within the audiobook. Yep, it’s that kind of book. READ FULL STORY

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