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Tag: Fiction (61-70 of 304)

See the new covers of 'Gone Girl' author Gillian Flynn's 'Sharp Objects' and 'Dark Places' — EXCLUSIVE

Gone Girl by former EW staffer Gillian Flynn might be the surprise runaway hit of 2012 — and it’s still killing it on the best-seller chart deep into 2013 — but it’s not her first rodeo. If you loved Gone Girl, you might want to check out her first two novels Sharp Objects and Dark Places, the film version of which will reportedly star Charlize Theron. Flynn’s previous books are certainly different from Gone Girl, but they carry some hallmarks that might seem familiar by now: heroines who are deeply screwed up but always engaging; bleak, low-skied Midwestern settings; smothering parental types; and, of course, sneaky, viperish twists.

Broadway Paperbacks is releasing new covers for Sharp Objects and Dark Places in early April, and they hew closer to the Gone Girl motif. Take an exclusive peek below! READ FULL STORY

Jo Nesbo's 'The Bat' gets U.S. release date -- See the exclusive new cover!

If you’re a U.S. fan of Norwegian author Jo Nesbo, we have some good news!

Nesbo’s first novel, The Bat, is going to be distributed in the U.S. for the first time as a Paperback Original on July 2. The first of three books in the Inspector Harry Hole series, The Bat tells the story of Harry Hole’s work on the Oslo Crime Squad, located in Austrtalia. When called to observe a case, Hole discovers a serial killer. The crime thriller then mixes suspense with romance when Hole stars to fall for a friend of one of the victims.

The Vintage Crime/Black Lizard publication of The Bat follows the U.S. release of Nesbo’s second book, Phantom, on Apr. 23 and the final book in the trilogy, The Redeemer, in May.

Check out an exclusive first look at The Bat‘s new cover below! READ FULL STORY

'Clarissa' meets 'Girls'? 'Clarissa Explains It All' continues with 'Things I Can't Explain' -- EXCLUSIVE

Watching repeats of Nickelodeon’s Clarissa Explains It All is like opening a neon-colored ’90s time capsule, where 15-year-old Clarissa Darling could explain absolutely anything with the help of quippy monologues, her best friend Sam, and rudimentary computer games. Now, almost 19 years after the series finale, Clarissa creator Mitchell Kriegman is letting our fashion-forward heroine enter uncharted territory with a new book, Things I Can’t Explain, tentatively slated for Fall 2014.

Acquired by Thomas Dunne Books editor and Macmillan Films head Brendan Deneen, the novel will follow 23-year-old Clarissa as she tries to carve out a career as a journalist and deals with the obstacles toward becoming a real adult: finding and keeping a job in a turbulent economy, the luxury of a first apartment without roommates, figuring out how to deal with parents all over again, and unexpected feelings for a really cute guy who — of course — has an on-and-off again girlfriend.

The premise sounds a lot like Clarissa Now, the 1995 CBS pilot that never made it to series but I would have given my right pinky toe to see. Will Ferguson be as dorky as always? (I could picture him as a business major at NYU). Will Sam climb up Clarissa’s New York fire escape like a terrifying intruder? Will Things I Can’t Explain ever get adapted for the CW or ABC Family? What are your hopes for 20-something Clarissa?

Follow @EWStephanLee on Twitter.

Read more:
‘Hunger Games’ author Suzanne Collins wrote for ‘Clarissa’ — what do Clarissa and Katniss have in common?
Melissa Joan Hart to explain it all in new memoir

Pick the cover of 'Eat, Pray, Love' author Elizabeth Gilbert's new novel

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Whether you’re drawn to Elizabeth Gilbert or repelled by her, you’re probably reacting to her massively popular 2006 memoir Eat, Pray, Love, which sold 10 million copies, caught Oprah’s attention, inspired a movie starring Julia Roberts, and — like many successful creative works by women — galvanized a vocal army of haters. Before EPL and the dutiful if forgettable follow-up Committed, she had written excellent fiction: a novel called Stern Men and a near-perfect collection of short stories called Pilgrims.

For fans of Gilbert’s fiction, it’s great news that she’s returning to the form after a 13-year absence. The Signature of All Things — an epic novel of love, ambition and 19th century botanical exploration — doesn’t come out until Oct. 1, but Gilbert is giving readers the opportunity to vote on the cover via her Facebook page. Voting begins 8 a.m. ET on Mar. 21 and ends Sunday, Mar. 24.

Which cover is your favorite? I’m leaning toward the beige one.

Follow @EWStephanLee on Twitter.

Read more:
Hyperion cancels book by Elizabeth Gilbert’s ex
Will Schwalbe discusses his affecting new memoir ‘The End of Your Life Book Club’
Cheryl Strayed talks ‘Wild,’ ‘Tiny Beautiful Things,’ Oprah, and ‘Dear Sugar’

Women's Prize for Fiction longlist announced

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The Women’s Prize for Fiction — formerly the Orange Prize before the telephone corporation withdrew its funding — has announced its 20 contenders out of 140 submissions. The wide-ranging longlist of female authors includes literary heavyweights like Zadie Smith and Barbara Kingsolver as well as newcomers Shani Boianjiu and Francesca Segal. It includes Bring Up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel, which EW named the best novel of 2012, as well as Sheila Heti’s How Should a Person Be?, which EW named one of the worst. See the full list below: READ FULL STORY

'Girls' guest star Bob Balaban really has written a best-selling series of books about a bionic dog. No, really...

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One of the best jokes on last night’s Girls involved Hannah’s therapist, played by guest star Bob Balaban, mentioning he had written a bestselling series of children’s books about a bionic dog.

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Dan Brown's 'Inferno' cover revealed -- PHOTO

This morning, Today revealed the art for Brown’s next mystery, entitled Inferno, which will see the return of serial protagonist, symbologist, and long-haired dude Robert Langdon, last seen in The Lost Symbol.

The cover art features an image of the Italian writer Dante, which is no coincidence: The book was inspired by his 14th-century poem and will take place in Italy. (Can we guess Florence? Because you can totally see Florence peeking through the cover.)

“With this new novel, I am excited to take readers on a journey deep into this mysterious realm … a landscape of codes, symbols, and more than a few secret passageways,” Brown said in a statement — and a world of symbol- and secret passageway-loving fans rejoiced.

Take a look at the cover after the jump. What do you think?

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Stephen King unearths origin of 'The Shining' sequel 'Doctor Sleep' -- EXCLUSIVE

A man never outlives his father.

That’s a line from William Faulkner, but it applies in earnest to Danny Torrance, the psychic little boy from Stephen King’s The Shining.

King is revisiting the now middle-aged Dan Torrance in the sequel Doctor Sleep (out Sept. 24) which finds him working at a hospice, where he uses his innate supernatural powers to ease the suffering of the dying. Dan may have survived his old man’s madness (and swinging mallet) in the hallways of that long-ago snowbound hotel, but he has grown up to realize that not all demons can be escaped. Some are a part of you.

In a wide-ranging interview with Entertainment Weekly, King reveals the origin story behind Doctor Sleep, talks about the fatherhood fears buried in The Shining, and speculates about what could become of his stories when he’s long, long gone …

READ FULL STORY

2013 Caldecott and Newbery Medal winners are announced

Awards season isn’t limited to those in film and television.

The American Library Association announced its own set of winners today for the best in children’s books.

The 2013 Caldecott Medal, which recognizes picture books, was awarded to Jon Klassen for This Is Not My Hat, a follow-up to his popular story, I Want My Hat Back. This Is Not My Hat is the tale of a small fish with a zealous attitude and what happens when he steals a hat from a larger creature.

The 2013 Newbery Medal for children’s literature was awarded to Katherine Applegate for The One and Only Ivan, which tells the story of an artistic gorilla that lives a caged life in a shopping center and hardly ever misses the jungle. But Ivan’s world is changed when he’s joined by a baby elephant that helps him to see things differently.

Even adults can appreciate the humor and creativity in these award-winning children’s books.

Read more:
10 Great New Historical Books for Kids
Great Books for Kids 4-6
Gary Ross: 10 Kids’ Books I Love

'Battling Boy': Paul Pope's epic creative quest to create a new generation superhero -- Exclusive Excerpt!

“What is the Superman we need for today?” The question haunts Paul Pope, and the comic book artist’s long-awaited opus Battling Boy, which publisher First Second Books will release on October 8. The graphic novel — the first of two volumes which combined will exceed 400 pages — represents the first major work from this leading light of independent comics since his mainstream breakthrough in 2006, the Eisner winning Batman: Year 100, a future-punk take on the dark knight rendered in his distinctive Kirby-strong storytelling that mixes kinetic Manga energy with expressive lines often associated with European comics. Battling Boy will arrive about three years behind schedule, and following a creative journey as epic as the saga itself, involving such larger-than-life characters as Oscar-winning producer Scott Rudin, acclaimed novelist Michael Chabon, and superstar Brad Pitt. Says Pope: “It’s been a strange couple years.”

More about Pope’s adventure through the Hollywood looking-glass in a bit. First: The book. Battling Boy is set on an alternate Earth – there are countless within this Lovecraftian multiverse — that’s having of a crisis moment: Monsters from another realm are terrorizing the dystopian sprawl of Arcopolis. When the ghouls assassinate the city’s high flying protector, a stern and gadgety Batman-meets-Iron Man type named Haggard West (he has a jet pack; drives a “Westmobile”), the suffering masses receive a new hero from the interdimensional mystical mothership from which all heroes come from: A haughty yet naïve superboy, the scrapping son of a war god. (You’ll meet both father and son in our exclusive excerpt from the book, which begins on page three.)  READ FULL STORY

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