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Tag: Essays (11-20 of 41)

Two out-of-print Nora Ephron titles to be published as a single volume

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Any existing physical copies of Nora Ephron’s Crazy Salad: Some Things about Women and Scribble, Scribble: Notes on the Media are probably well-worn, underlined, and doggy-eared by now. Crazy Salad and Scribble, Scribble have been out-of-print as solo volumes since 1991 and 1984, respectively. Vintage will be giving these two landmark books a fresh printing as a single volume come Oct. 16. They will also be available in their entirety as e-books for the first time on that date.

Crazy Salad, originally published in 1975, contains Ephron’s famous, oft-quoted essay “A Few Words About Breasts.”

After Ephron died in June, did you go looking for her backlist only to have trouble finding these two titles?

Follow @EWStephanLee on Twitter.

Read more:
Nora Ephron’s life in books: Read some of her best quotes
A critic’s appreciation: Nora Ephron’s words are worth a thousand pictures
Nora Ephron: Our favorite film moments — VIDEO

David Sedaris is finally going Hollywood. Which of his essays do you want to see on screen?

How is it that none of David Sedaris’ work has been adapted for the big screen yet? The prolific humorist has always been protective of his essays, especially ones in which his family plays a large role. (Perhaps Sedaris saw Running With Scissors as a cautionary tale). But back in 2010, Sedaris gave the go-ahead to writer-director Kyle Patrick Alvarez (Easier than Practice) to make a movie of “C.O.G.,” a narrative piece from Sedaris’ 1997 collection Naked, and it’s now slated to start production this October, Indiewire reports. “C.O.G.,” which stands for “Child of God,” is based on an episode from Sedaris’ 20s when he and a fanatical Christian attempted to sell stones cut into the shape of Oregon at a local fair.

I could see a number of Sedaris’ essays being turned into comic, Wes Anderson-ish indies. Here are some others that I’d love to see in theaters: READ FULL STORY

Nora Ephron's life in books: Read some of her best quotes

Nora Ephron, who died of acute myeloid leukemia last night at age 71, was perhaps best known for her films When Harry Met Sally, Sleepless in Seattle, and Julie & Julia — but she began her career in words as an essayist, and remained one throughout her life. Her essay collections — and for that matter, her 1983 novel Heartburn about her messy divorce from journalist Carl Bernstein — were funny, sharp, relatable, and highly personal, and they became even more so in her later years. Click through for some of the most memorable zingers, observations, and bon mots from her ever-quotable books.

NEXT: Wallflower at the Orgy

Sloane Crosley on her new Kindle Single and how bad experiences make for funny stories

Book publicist turned best-selling author Sloane Crosley doesn’t have a new book coming out any time soon, but for those of us who are eager for more of her hilarious, perceptive observations, it’s lucky she’s gotten into the digital publishing game. Up the Down Volcano, Crosley’s first full-length essay since the publication of her second collection How Did You Get This Number, is available exclusively on Amazon as a Kindle Single. This hilarious yet harrowing account of summiting the Ecuadorian stratovolcano Cotopaxi — Crosley-style — reads more like an epic than her previous works, yet it retains her signature brand of intelligent humor, which stems from keen observation and honest self-assessment. EW caught up with this busy writer to talk about her new Single, the ways digital publishing can resemble the music industry, Arrested Development, and a lot more.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: I laughed out loud while reading “Up the Down Volcano,” but I was also very conscious of the fact that your experience couldn’t have been funny when you were going through it. Are many of the experiences you write about only funny in retrospect?
SLOANE CROSLEY: Yes. Those generally make for better stories. I think that if you can see the humor while it’s happening – this is cliché – you’re tempted to not live in the moment, or it’s already fermenting into a story in your mind as it’s happening. You start mentally taking notes; that doesn’t necessarily mean it won’t come out as funny or a worthwhile story on the other side, but for me personally, it’s more rewarding if there’s something [deeper] going on. Part of me thinks that it’s a defense mechanism that takes the pressure off of just trying to be funny, but most of me thinks that’s where people need humor the most, both as readers and as writers. READ FULL STORY

Shelf Life Confessional: Which books have made you lose it in public?

During the weekends, New York City is a hectic, overcrowded, energetic place to be. Throw in some great fall weather and additional out-of-town marathoners and you’ve got one even more hectic, overcrowded, energetic place to be. During these sort of weekends, a quiet moment in this city is about as reasonable a thing to expect as finding an affordable apartment.

So don’t ask me why I opted to read Mindy Kaling’s quirky, sweet new book Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns) in a busy, bustling park and assumed my giggle fits would go unnoticed. (They didn’t.) I knew I was in trouble when even the introduction made me laugh heartily in a public setting and I only continued to do so through her funny, relatable brand of storytelling. READ FULL STORY

Mindy Kaling: An in-depth interview about her book, childhood, shoes, and homemade sashimi

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When I spoke to Mindy Kaling last month about Is Everyone Hanging Out without Me?, her book of funny insights (available today!), it really felt like chatting with a good friend. Reading the book itself actually feels the same way. Kaling talks about her life up until now — an awkward childhood, penniless years in New York, her enviable job on The Office — all in her smart, honest, naturally humorous tone. While way more intelligent and lovely than her Office character Kelly Kapoor, Kaling was similarly talkative with me — check out how long this interview is! We delved into some of the specifics of her book, so I’ll throw up a SPOILER ALERT in case you want to come back after you finish Is Everyone Hanging Out without Me?.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: You’re incredibly popular among my group of friends. I just want to tell you that you really resonate with 20-somethings. But who do you think is your audience? READ FULL STORY

Chuck Eddy's 'Rock and Roll Always Forgets': 25 years of unique pop-music writing

I admit it: It took me a good 10 years to “get” Chuck Eddy. Reading his early pieces, mostly in The Village Voice, where music editor and ultra-talent-scout Robert Christgau showcased Eddy’s idiosyncratic ardencies (Montgomery Gentry? White Wizzard?) and a prose style that was conversational if your idea of conversation was being hectored by a good-natured obsessive, I was stumped. Eddy defeated my pride in being able to ignore the taste of a critic as long as he or she wrote well. His aesthetic seemed random, if not willfully, showily perverse.

But eventually – through sheer quality; through sheer quantity (as a once and future freelancer myself, I admire a man who churns out well-wrought sentences by the ream) – Eddy won me over. How glad I am to see the publication of Eddy’s new song(s) of himself Rock and Roll Always Forgets: A Quarter Century of Music Criticism (Duke University Press). Glad, first, because it’s truly a representative selection, tracing the slithery paths of Eddy’s enthusiasms from Marilyn Manson to Mindy McCready just to stick with the “M”s, with tart new intros that set up reprints of some of his greatest hits. And glad, second, that there exist publishers still willing to release anthologies of rock writing, since so much great rock criticism remains uncollected, neglected, less forgotten than never known to a wider audience. (Can we get a Tom Smucker book together, please? I’ll edit the damn thing myself.) READ FULL STORY

Authors create website to lend support to Occupy Wall Street

It’s been over a month since Occupy Wall Street protesters took to lower Manhattan to protest a whole host of issues regarding financial regulation, inequality, and frustration with America’s current economic system. With growing media coverage, celeb spotting, and protests popping up in other cities all over the world, everyone has an opinion, and it’s no surprise that authors have decided to weigh in as well. READ FULL STORY

Mindy Kaling takes the EW Book Quiz: Her favorite books, and the book she'd kill a bug with

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Mindy Kaling, known for writing zippy tweets and hilarious episodes of The Office, is trying her hand at authoring a book: Her collection of essays, anecdotes, and humorous observations, Is Everyone Hanging Out without Me (and Other Concerns) will be coming out Nov. 1. In the meantime, EW got a chance to chat with Kaling about her somewhat un-Kelly-Kapoor-like reading habits and taste in books.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: When do you find time to read? I imagine your work is all-consuming. READ FULL STORY

William Shatner reads from 'Shatner Rules' -- EXCLUSIVE

William Shatner is famous for — among many, many other things — his distinctive, halting voice. Now you can hear him read a very honest, funny selection from his own book, Shatner Rules: Your Guide to Understanding the Shatnerverse and the World At Large, which is out today. In the below clip, he talks about aging and the fact that life in Hollywood isn’t over after 40 … or even 80, for that matter. Shatner is proof of that! READ FULL STORY

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