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Tag: Edward and Bella (1-8 of 8)

Take a sneak peek at the Twilight 'New Moon' graphic novel -- EXCLUSIVE

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If you’re a Twilight fan, you’ve probably experienced New Moon in more than one form already, but now you have another. The first installment of the New Moon graphic novel—based on the story by Stephenie Meyer with art by Young Kim—will be available on April 30. In the first volume, Bella and Edward find themselves facing new obstacles, including a devastating separation, the mysterious appearance of dangerous wolves roaming the forest in Forks, a terrifying threat of revenge from a female vampire, and a deliciously sinister encounter with Italy’s reigning royal family of vampires: the Volturi.

Take a look at the exclusive pages here!

What We Learned From Stephenie Meyer's 'The Twilight Saga: The Official Illustrated Guide'

Twilight-saga

The official 543-page encyclopedia to Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight series hit bookstores Tuesday, offering in-depth profiles of even the most peripheral characters, outtakes from the novels, genealogical charts, and original illustrations (including the sketch of Bella’s wedding dress seen exclusively on EW.com last week). Meyer clearly wanted The Illustrated Guide to supplement her series, to put on paper the world she carried for so long in her head. Some of the book’s notable tidbits:

—It includes a 2008 Q&A between Meyer and her friend Shannon Hale (Princess Academy) in which Meyer says Jacob was originally an afterthought. “Jacob was born — as a device really — to tell Bella what she needed to know [about Edward being a vampire].”

—Edward’s first human victim was actually Esme’s abusive ex-husband from her pre-vampire days. (Edward tracked him down and sought vengeance for his adopted mother.)

—When Quileute Leah Clearwater first turned into a werewolf, the shock of seeing her transformation caused her father (and Charlie Swan’s best friend) Harry Clearwater to have a heart attack.

—Bella’s parents met at First Beach, on the La Push reservation, during Charlie’s rookie year on the police force. They fell in love and were married within a few weeks.

—Meyer offers an annotated playlist of songs that influenced certain moments in the series. The description of Edward and Bella’s first dance as husband and wife was inspired by Muse’s “Can’t Take My Eyes Off of You.”

—The book outtakes include a section cut from New Moon in which Bella got high on Percocet after slugging Jacob and hurting her hand. “How’s your arm?” “I can’t feel it. Is it still there?”

Twilight fans — who’s bought the book? Who’s planning to (or not planning to)?


'The Twilight Saga: The Official Illustrated Guide': See Bella in her wedding dress -- EXCLUSIVE

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EW has not one but two exclusive images from Stephenie Meyer’s new book, The Twilight Saga: The Official Illustrated Guide, which goes on sale April 12: Bella as a vampire and Bella in her wedding dress. A nice walk-up to the first Breaking Dawn film, no? I didn’t expect to like the first Twilight graphic novel as much as I did, and these illustrations are by that book’s illustrator, Young Kim, who did such a great job bringing Meyer’s characters to life.

What do you think? Is this how you visualize Bella in the upcoming film?

Exclusive: Stephenie Meyer's 'The Twilight Saga: The Official Illustrated Guide' to go on sale April 12, 2011

twilight-illustrated-guide_216.jpg The bad news: It’s not another sequel.

The good news: There will be plenty of brand-new details in The Twilight Saga: The Official Illustrated Guide, a reference book Stephenie Meyer created to accompany her best-selling novels. According to a press release from Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, the $24.99 encyclopedia, which will go on sale April 12, 2011, includes “character profiles, outtakes, a conversation with Meyer, genealogical charts, maps, extensive cross-references, and much more,” including art by Young Kim, who illustrated Twilight: The Graphic Novel, Volume 1.

For her part, Meyer said, “I’m always amazed at how many in-depth questions my readers have about my characters and the world within the Twilight Saga. With The Official Illustrated Guide, I hoped we could incorporate as many details as possible, including character histories, like Alice’s back story.”

Let’s hear from Twilight fans–is this something you want for your collection?

Why 'The Hunger Games' isn't the new 'Twilight'

It’s Twilight all over again.

How many times have I heard that in the two years since The Hunger Games came out? Too many too count. And I have to say, it continues to baffle me: These novels could not be more different. Stephenie Meyer’s is more of a traditional romance (populated, I grant you, by some pretty untraditional characters); while Suzanne Collins’ is a tale of war and survival.

Is it that both books star unforgettable women? I suppose you could say that in the most sweeping and general sense, Katniss Everdeen and Bella Swan are alike: Both have cores of steel. They know what they want, and they aren’t going to back down. But for me, any similarity ends there.

Forged by famine, disease, and unbelievable hardship, Katniss, 16, regularly slips beneath the electrified barbed wire fence to hunt and forage for her her family–a crime punishable by death. She’s not interested in romance. She’s not big on forgiveness (even when it comes to her own mother). And when her younger sister, Primrose, is selected by lottery to participate in the barbaric murder ritual called The Hunger Games, Katniss steps in and takes her place. Bella, on the other hand, has known sadness but not poverty or want.  Arriving in Forks to live with her dad, knowing no one, she’s the shy girl, the outcast, who’s suddenly plucked from obscurity by the ravishingly handsome Edward Cullen. Hers is the stuff of classic fairy tales; she’s a princess who must be rescued, time and time again, by her one of her two prince charmings, either the vampire or the werewolf. Frankly, compared to Katniss, Bella is simply the more passive character: For the most part, things happen to her. Katniss, on the other hand, copes with disaster by strategizing–and bulldozing–her way through the situation. Does she ever need to be rescued? Absolutely. But  she also rescues Peeta–a real or feigned love interest?–more than once along the way.

That brings me to the love triangle issue. Could it be that people compare the two books because their heroines must choose between two men? Again, I don’t find this valid. Bella, it seems to me, never wavers in her love for Edward, despite Jacob’s devotion. In contrast,  I’m left with the feeling that Katniss may very well not know what love is at all. She may have been too badly damaged by war, by deprivation, by emotional and physical torture to ever be able to love fully and normally. Whatever she feels for Peeta or for Gale, it isn’t the headlong devotion Bella has for Edward.  More importantly, the question of whom Katniss will end up with isn’t what drives the narrative.  In other words, the question isn’t, Which one will she marry? The question is, Will she live until the end of the book?

So weigh in, Shelf Lifers. Do you think Twilight and The Hunger Games tread the same territory?

Stephenie Meyer's novella, 'The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner,' and the Red Cross

This morning Little, Brown announced a first printing of Meyer’s  novella, The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner. Bree figures prominently in the movie version of Eclipse, opening June 30 (and director David Slade was able to read an early copy of the novella). But as fans remember, she does not appear in the book until page 569, in a pivotal scene where Bella and the Cullens encounter some of Victoria’s wild vampires in the forest: “The girl was curled into a small ball beside the flames, her arms wrapped around her legs….Her eyes were focused on me, and the eyes were a shocking, brilliant red.” Of Meyer’s decision to donate money from the sale of each book to the Red Cross, Little, Brown deputy publisher Andrew Smith says,  “The plight of folks in Haiti and now Chile has been so much in the media, and very much on Stephenie’s radar,” pointing out that Meyer has been talking about the subject on her website for some time. (On January 27, she wrote, “I’ve been very impressed with the world in general and the Twilight fansite in specific in the support and love everyone is giving to Haiti.”) The website dedicated to the new book, breetanner.com — which will feature the book beginning June 7 — will provide a Red Cross link tied specifically to the novella. “We’ll be able to track how much Twilight fans are giving,” Smith says.

Exclusive: Twilight, The Graphic Novel

I’m delighted to announce, exclusively, that Yen Press will publish Twilight: The Graphic Novel, Vol. 1 on March 16, with a first printing of 350,000 copies.  Here’s a first glimpse at the book’s cover, as well as an exclusive peek at one of its panels (for a full ten-page excerpt, and the entire Q&A with Stephenie Meyer, see the issue of EW that goes on sale this Friday).

What strikes me, looking at the book, is how faithfully, and how beautifully, artist Young Kim has translated Meyer’s original vision. Kim, who has a fine arts background—in fact, this is her first foray into graphic novels—didn’t just read the book; she absorbed it. Her Bella is the Bella I had in my mind’s eye the first time I read Twilight; her Edward is the Edward I always imagined. It took me back to reading Twilight pre-movie: Kristen Stewart and Rob Pattinson faded into the background.

Meyer talked to us about all this, and more. Here are a few snippets from our conversation:

The text of your original novel is boiled down so carefully that it doesn’t feel like anything is missing. Were you the one who did that?

I was definitely involved.  I didn’t do the original “script” for the book, so to speak.  But when I got the dialogue with the images, I did a lot of tinkering. In a couple of places, I asked for missing scenes to be inserted.  For example, the conversation in the car that Bella and Edward have after she faints in Biology.

How does the feeling of reading the graphic novel compare to that of reading the original? Does it bring something new to the experience for you?

For me, it takes me back to the days when I was writing Twilight.  It’s been a while since I was really able to read Twilight; there is so much baggage attached to that book for me now.  It seems like all I can see are the mistakes in the writing.  Reading Young’s version brought me back to the feeling I had when I was writing and it was just me and the characters again.  I love that.  I thank her for it.

When this project is done, are you done with Twilight?

I can’t say that I am done with Twilight forever.  I’m not working on anything new Twilight-related now, and probably not for a while.  But there’s still a possibility that I’ll go back and close some of the open doors.

What do you think, Twihards? Are you excited about this?

Are Edward and Bella in an abusive relationship?

I’m the first person who’ll tell you how important the Twilight series is — not from a literary standpoint, mind you, but more from a reading standpoint: These are books that get kids reading. And yet, as a feminist and the mom of teenage daughters, I’ve also got some problems with them — namely, their depiction of women and relationships. Why does Bella always need to be rescued by men? Can’t she rescue herself occasionally? Heck — can’t she even drive herself places? (In New Moon, whenever she’s in her truck with either Edward or Jacob, they’re the ones driving.) Why do all the male vampires have college degrees, medical degrees, and so forth, while — SPOILER ALERT FROM ECLIPSE AND BREAKING DAWN!!! — Bella gets married fresh out of high school, with nary a word breathed about higher education? And then, when she becomes pregnant, why does she emphatically refuse an abortion, even though the pregnancy is killing her? (Let me be clear: I’m not saying it’s wrong for a woman to choose marriage and motherhood, or wrong for her to decide against college. But Bella is still a kid, even in Breaking Dawn.)

So last week, in his excellent blog post, movie critic Owen Gleiberman compared Edward to a stalker. And yesterday, in “Is Team Edward Enabling Domestic Violence?”, GalleyCat’s Ron Hogan called my attention to a LiveJournal post describing how the Edward-Bella romance has all the earmarks of an abusive relationship as defined by a national domestic violence group: “Does your partner look at you or act in ways that scare you? Check. Make all the decisions? Check. Threaten to kill you? On their first date….”

Hmmm. what do you think?

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