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Tag: Dave Eggers (1-10 of 12)

On the Books: Indie bookstores reject Amazon Kindle exchange program

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Amazon’s latest effort to push Kindles through indie bookstores has not been well-received. Meanwhile, NaNoWriMo is in full swing, with a new take by grammar site Grammarly. Read on for more of today’s top books headlines: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Dave Eggers denies plagiarism claims; unpublished Stieg Larsson story to appear in anthology

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Dave Eggers defends The Circle, an unpublished Stieg Larsson work will be published next year and writers remember Tom Clancy in a series of tributes. Read on for more of today’s top books headlines: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Dave Eggers accused of stealing female author's book idea; Bridget Jones debate continues

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Thought you heard the last of Bridget Jones, the MacArthur “genius” grants, or the Man Booker Prize? Think again. Here are today’s top books headlines to kick off October: READ FULL STORY

And the 2012 National Book Award winners are ...

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The 2012 National Book Award winners were announced tonight during a blacktie gala at Cipriani’s in Lower Manhattan. Winning the big fiction prize was Louise Erdrich for her gut-wrenching novel The Round House, which centers on a grave injustice that rocks a Native American community. In a turn that didn’t surprise us whatsoever, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Katherine Boo won for her stunning work of nonfiction, Behind the Beautiful Forevers. David Ferry and William Alexander also won big in Poetry and Young People’s Literature, respectively. See below for a full list of finalists with winners in bold, and click on links for the EW reviews. READ FULL STORY

Two new Ray Bradbury stories out this fall

Image Credit: Steve Castillo/AP

Ray Bradbury fans can add two new stories to their holiday wish list.

The celebrated science fiction writer, who passed away in June, wrote two stories toward the end of his life that are set for release this fall, AP reports. The first, “The Book and the Butterfly,” serves as the introduction to this year’s “Best American Nonrequired Reading” anthology; the second, “Dear Santa,” appears in the holiday issue of Birmingham, Michigan’s Strand Magazine.

READ FULL STORY

2012 National Book Awards finalists announced

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Minutes ago, the finalists for the National Book Awards were announced on MSNBC’s Morning Joe. There were 20 books announced in four categories: Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, and Young People’s Literature. Among the nominees are five Pulitzer-winners and five debut authors. See below for the full list, and click the titles for EW’s reviews. READ FULL STORY

Subject of Dave Eggers' 'Zeitoun' pleaded guilty in domestic abuse case

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The New Orleans man whose post-Hurricane Katrina struggles and heroism inspired Dave Eggers’ much-lauded nonfiction book Zeitoun was convicted last year of battering his wife, The Smoking Gun has uncovered. Abdulrahman Zeitoun, 54, was arrested in a domestic abuse incident at the home of his wife Kathryn and their five children. A police report reads: READ FULL STORY

Literary agent Andrew Wylie signs controversial exclusive deal with Amazon

Andrew Wylie is one of the book world’s most notorious agents who, in reality show parlance, definitely isn’t here to make friends. Dubbed “the Jackal,” if that gives you an idea of how he’s viewed, Wylie is best known for successfully extracting enormous advances from publishers for his big-name clients, as well as poaching authors from other agents. Now the highly visible agent, whose stable includes the likes of Dave Eggers, Salman Rushdie and Philip Roth (as well as the estates of Nabokov and Updike) is creating a stir in the realm of e-books.

Last week Wylie signed a deal with Amazon for exclusive e-book rights to his clients’ novels, including such classics as Roth’s Portnoy’s Complaint and Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man. For at least two years, these works will only be available via the online retailer and only on Amazon’s Kindle or devices with the downloaded Kindle app. Many are considering this a literary monopoly, vertical integration for a medium barely into its infancy. And where even the famously hermetic and anti-third party iPad permits users to download e-books from a variety of sources, the Kindle only allows readers to access digital copies from Amazon. Random House, which published a number of the titles covered by the deal, has since announced their intentions to dispute its legality. Random House spokesman Stuart Applebaum issued a statement which said, in part, “The Wylie Agency’s decision to sell e-books exclusively to Amazon for titles which are subject to active Random House agreements undermines our longstanding commitments to and investments in our authors, and it establishes this Agency as our direct competitor. Therefore, regrettably, Random House on a worldwide basis will not be entering into any new English-language business agreements with the Wylie Agency until this situation is resolved.”

Square Books, an independent bookstore in Oxford, Mississippi, has a compelling take on the whole situation.

What do you think about the issue, Shelf Lifers?

EW picks Daniyal Mueenuddin and Dave Eggers' titles as the best books of 2009: What's your fave?

It’s that time again: As 2009 draws to a close, we’ve been given the formidable task of culling the finest literature from the year. As always, it was tough picking out the best from a bevy of books published in the last 12 months. But who won? In the fiction category, it was Daniyal Mueenuddin’s collection of short stories, In Other Rooms, Other Wonders. As for nonfiction, the always reliable Dave Eggers topped the list with his Hurricane Katrina-centric book, Zeitoun. (For EW’s complete list of the top 10 fiction and nonfiction titles of the year, pick up a copy of our year-end Best & Worst double issue, on newsstands now.)

But that’s just EW’s opinion, Shelf Lifers. Tell us, which books top your 2009 list?

Colum McCann's 'Let the Great World Spin' wins National Book Award

Let the Great World Spin, Irish-born writer Colum McCann’s well-received novel about 1970s New York City, won the National Book Award for fiction on Wednesday night. Other winners announced at the 60th annual ceremony in New York City included T.J. Stiles’ The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt for nonfiction, Keith Waldrop’s Transcendental Studies for poetry, and Phillip Hoose’s Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice for young people’s literature. (Hoose, a finalist in the same category in 2001, won for his book about the African American civil rights pioneer who refused to give up her seat on a bus years before Rosa Parks.)

There was one more competitive prize announced at the black-tie dinner at Manhattan’s Cipriani Wall Street, a Best of the National Book Awards Award. Based on 10,000 votes from the reading public, one title emerged as the favorite of all the winners in the prize’s 60-year history: Flannery O’Connor’s The Complete Stories, a posthumous collection that won the fiction prize in 1972.

The National Book Foundation, which administers the prizes (worth $10,000 each), also presented honorary medals to Gore Vidal for distinguished contribution to American letters and to author/activist/McSweeney’s founder Dave Eggers (the Literarian Award).

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