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Tag: Comic Books (81-90 of 144)

Legendary 'Batman' artist Jerry Robinson, who helped create Robin and The Joker, dies at 89

Mourning in Gotham City, and across all of fanboy nation: Legendary comic book artist Jerry Robinson has died at the age of 89. Robinson, who was born in Trenton, N.J., on Jan. 1, 1922, was recruited to DC Comics by Batman creator Bob Kane and made key contributions to the character’s mythos. In addition to Robin the Boy Wonder, Robinson is credited with helping to develop Bruce Wayne’s butler, Alfred, and two of the caped crusader’s best-known enemies, Two-Face and The Joker, both of which were featured in director Christopher Nolan’s last Batman flick, The Dark Knight, played by Aaron Eckhart and an Oscar-winning Heath Ledger, respectively. (It should be noted that the business of determining who came up with what in comics can be tricky and contentious. For example, Bob Kane — who died in 1998 — claimed that he and original Batman scribe Bill Finger concocted The Joker.) READ FULL STORY

'Watchmen' writer Alan Moore joins Occupy Comics group, slams Frank Miller for criticizing protesters

Watchmen writer Alan Moore has joined Occupy Comics, an organization of comics-industry notables who are lending their support to the Occupy Wall Street movement. Moore’s fellow Occupy Comics signatories include Charlie Adlard (The Walking Dead), Steve Niles (30 Days of Night), and David Lloyd.

The support of Moore and Lloyd is notable both because of the weight they carry in the comics community, and because it was their comic, V for Vendetta, which first introduced the Guy Fawkes masks regularly worn by Occupy Wall Street protesters. READ FULL STORY

Sneak peek at DC's 'Swamp Thing #4': 'I said VANILLA!' -- EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW

swamp-thing-04-cover

Hey, remember Inside-Out Boy, Nickelodeon’s cute-yet-totally-horrifying commercial-break mascot, who swung a little bit too high on a swing set and somehow turned his body completely inside out, making him a walking mass of exposed tendons and pinkish organ meat? There’s a horrifying young child in the current run of Swamp Thing who seems almost like a gritty inverted reboot of Inside-Out Boy. In the opening pages of next week’s Swamp Thing #4, hospital escapee William walks into a diner and orders a vanilla milkshake. The ice cream man mishears him — William is covered in blood and wearing a breathing mask, so his confusion is understandable. Horrifying inside-out shenanigans ensue.

You can read the full issue when it hits stores Dec. 7. For now, check out EW’s full sneak peek here.

Read more:
Sneak peek at DC’s #2 ‘Batgirl’ — EXCLUSIVE
Superman #1, The Dark Knight #1, Aquaman #1: New comics reviews
Batman #1 and other new DC Comics reviews

Human Torch: 'Fantastic Four' character lives again after less than a year

The comic book industry has three defining publicity-grabbing gimmicks: the New Costume, the Retcon Reboot, and the Beloved Character Death. In January, Fantastic Four packaged two of those gimmicks together, killing off the Human Torch and rebranding the team with skintight-stormtrooper costumes. My colleague Jeff Jensen was initially skeptical about the death of the Torch, but later noted that writer Jonathan Hickman justified the death in the narrative. And hey, there’s nothing fundamentally wrong with publicity-grabbing gimmicks. Still, one can’t help but feel a combination of déjà vu and vertigo upon hearing that, in the just-released Fantastic Four #600, the Human Torch will make his triumphant return to life after less than a year of being dead. READ FULL STORY

Sneak peek at DC's 'Superman #3': A brief history of Superman -- EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW

Currently, DC is offering two specific flavors of Superman. While Grant Morrison’s Action Comics presents a slightly younger (and politically motivated) Supes freshly arrived in the big city, Superman features the hero as a well-established fixture in Metropolis society. Next week’s Superman #3 provides some intriguing connective tissue between the two eras, beginning with an extended monologue that doubles as a nice revisionist history: It almost seems as if the speaker is saying that the presence of Superman has made Metropolis more dangerous, not less.

You can read the full issue when it hits stores Nov. 23. For now, check out EW’s full sneak peek here.

Read more:
Sneak peek at DC’s #2 ‘Batgirl’ — EXCLUSIVE
Superman #1, The Dark Knight #1, Aquaman #1: New comics reviews
Batman #1 and other new DC Comics reviews

Sneak peek at DC's 'Supergirl #3': Supergirl, meet Superman -- EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW

There have been various versions of Supergirl throughout the years — who can forget when she fell in love with Lex Luthor, or when she started fighting demons in her Earth-Born Angel phase? — but in her most iconic interpretation, Supergirl is an escapee from the planet Krypton… just like her cousin Kal-El, a.k.a. Superman. That’s the interpretation on display in the rebooted Supergirl as part of DC’s New 52. In the upcoming Supergirl #3, Supergirl meets her famous relative and gets the down-low on Krypton’s destruction.

You can read the full issue when it hits stores Nov. 16. For now, check out EW’s full sneak peek here.

Read more:
Sneak peek at DC’s #2 ‘Batgirl’ — EXCLUSIVE
Superman #1, The Dark Knight #1, Aquaman #1: New comics reviews
Batman #1 and other new DC Comics reviews

Sneak peek at DC's 'Superboy #3': Journey to the Center of the Earth! -- EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW

A long time ago, Superboy and Superman were the same Super-person at different stages of their life. But in the young hero’s current incarnation, he’s his own person — a creature bred in a laboratory, half-human and half-Kryptonian. In next week’s Superboy #3, the kid gets trapped in his own private remake of The Core, falling precipitously into the molten lava beneath the surface of the Earth. The issue also kicks off with a mysterious couple robbing a convenience store in the most elaborately homicidal method possible.

You can read the full issue when it hits stores Nov. 9. For now, check out EW’s full sneak peek here.

Read more:
Sneak peek at DC’s #2 ‘Batgirl’ — EXCLUSIVE
Superman #1, The Dark Knight #1, Aquaman #1: New comics reviews
Batman #1 and other new DC Comics reviews

Comic Book Reviews: 'Wolverine and the X-Men,' 'Spaceman,' and more

Went to the comic book store this weekend, bought some stuff. Artist Marcos Martin’s work on Daredevil #5 (Marvel Comics) – his first full issue in what I hope will be a long, classic run – was a delight. The final issue of writer Jonathan Hickman’s fighter pilots of the future/father vs. son/time travel saga The Red Wing (Image Comics) was trippy and touching; seek out the trade when all four issues (superbly rendered by artist Nick Pitarra and colorist Rachelle Rosenberg) are collected. I wish I was equally affected by Hickman’s current work on FF (Marvel), the much-hyped new formulation of the Fantastic Four, with Spider-Man replacing the recently-extinguished (i.e., “killed”) Human Torch. I’ve been disappointed by the inconsistent art and focus on peripheral players like The Inhumans and the Kree. More needs to be done to make Spidey feel more essential to this book. To borrow a phrase from a departed friend: Flame on, dammit! (BTW: Was the new issue really the climax of the “Four Cities” saga as has been advertised? Didn’t play that way to me.) READ FULL STORY

Superman gets picketed! Sneak peak at 'Action Comics' #3 -- EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW

Many superhero fans rolled their eyes when DC Comics announced it was going to give Superman a youth culture makeover — edgier attitude; blue jeans instead of tights — in order to make the icon more relevant. But with writer Grant Morrison at the helm, Action Comics has emerged as one of the best books in the publisher’s ‘New 52′ line.

The third issue — which hits comic book stores on November 2  — shows what happens when the citizens of Metropolis get fed up with their self-appointed protector. (#OccupyMetropolis!) And as this exclusive preview shows, the story also offers a sense of what life was like on Post-Flashpoint Krypton. The art team: Rags Morales, Brent Anderson, Rick Bryant.

CLICK HERE FOR THE EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW

Twitter: @EWDocJensen

Read more:
Sneak peek at DC’s #2 visually stunning ‘Batwoman’ — EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW
Sneak peek at DC’s #2 ‘Batgirl’ — EXCLUSIVE
Reviews: ‘Batman,’ ‘Uncanny X-Men,’ the outstanding graphic novel ‘Daybreak’

Comic Book Reviews: Latest issues of 'Batman' and 'Uncanny X-Men'; the outstanding graphic novel 'Daybreak'

Went to the comic book store this weekend, bought a bunch of stuff. Casanova: Avaritia #2 by Matt Fraction and Gabriel Ba was sensationally strange, while Swamp Thing #2 hooked me on the series. What I’ll be reading over the next couple days: Howard Chaykin’s Avengers 1959, the new issue of Brian Michael Bendis and Alex Maleev’s Moon Knight, and the hardcover collection of Echoes by Joshua Hale Fialkov and Rahsan Ekedal. This week’s reviews:

BATMAN #2 (DC Comics; monthly series) Bruce Wayne must survive assassination by an agent from the Court of Owls, an urban myth that shouldn’t exist but apparently does. Or doesn’t. Time will tell. WHAT’S GOOD: Scott Snyder’s characterization of The Dark Knight, which emphasizes the hero’s detective skills and Bruce Wayne’s relationship with Gotham City, “my oldest and truest friend.”  READ FULL STORY

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