Shelf Life Book news, reviews, trends, and talk

Tag: Comic Books (61-70 of 153)

Take a sneak peek at 'The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo' graphic novel -- EXCLUSIVE

GIRL-WITH-THE-DRAGON-TATTOO-COVER.jpg

If the book, movie, and other movie weren’t enough, DC Entertainment will release the graphic novel version of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo on Nov. 13, written by crime author Denise Mina and illustrated by Andrea Mutti and Leonardo Manco. We already gave you a super-early preview back in April, and here are a few more to tide you over until the release. First up: Check out Lisbeth Salander’s hacking skills in graphic novel form.

My Little Pony meets Sin City: Comic book stars Grant Morrison, Darick Robertson talk up the surreal pulp of 'Happy!'

happy-cover.jpg

Grant Morrison and Darick Robertson have created some of the most acclaimed – and controversial – comics of the past two decades. Scottish scribe Morrison has spent the past several years writing best-selling Superman and Batman titles for DC Comics (and penning a great history lesson/memoir Supergods: Our World In The Age of The Superhero), but before that made his name with audacious original work like The Invisibles, The Filth and Flex Mentallo, filled with challenging ideas, formal experimentation and high strange surrealism.  California-based artist Robertson, known for his strong, visceral style, has worked in many genres, from pulp to sci-fi, and is best known for long runs on two hard-edged satires, The Boys and Transmetropolitan.

Now, the two talents have teamed up – for the first time – to produce the ironically titled Happy!, a four-issue mini-series that tracks the twisted downward spiral of an utterly reprehensible thug named Nick Sax… and his imaginary friend Happy!, an aggressively sweet winged horse. The first issue, now in stores, includes foul language, brutal violence and a sexual encounter involving a man dressed as seafood.

Naturally, it’s a Christmas story.

It’s also a gleefully gonzo-sick crime comic, and the beginning of a return to trippy-edgy creator-owned stuff for Morrison after years of marvelous mainstream toil. In separate interviews, EW.com spoke with Morrison and Robertson about their collaboration.

READ FULL STORY

Marvel's Venom pulls up NYC stake for Philly steak

Philly’s getting a new fan in the pages of Marvel Comics, but whether the City of Brotherly Shove takes to anti-hero Venom remains to be seen.

Marvel Entertainment LLC says that Venom — a brute with big teeth and an elongated tongue who’s made a habit of sparring with Spider-Man — is leaving New York City to start fresh, and maybe learn to be a hero on the streets of Philadelphia.

Writer Cullen Bunn and Editor Tom Brennan, an alum of Philadelphia’s Drexel University, said it’s time Philly had a hero of its own, putting it in the same league as Los Angeles and New York, among other real-life cities that populate the fictional world of Marvel.

But is Venom — an alien symbiote bonded to Peter Parker’s one-time high school rival Eugene “Flash” Thompson — the hero that Philly wants or needs?

It depends, said Bunn. READ FULL STORY

'Justice League' #12: DC reveals Superman's new leading lady... and it's a doozy -- EXCLUSIVE

When DC Comics rebooted its entire line of superhero titles last year, the publisher did away with Superman’s marriage to Lois Lane to pave the way for a new romance. Without further ado, EW can exclusively reveal that Superman’s new partner in love is no mere mortal, but a superhero icon in her own right: None other than Wonder Woman. herself. Their next level relationship begins in the pages of Justice League #12; click through to see the full cover! READ FULL STORY

Comic-Con: Neil Gaiman to write new 'Sandman' series for DC Comics' Vertigo imprint

Neil-Gaiman.jpg

Call it a dream come true. Acclaimed fantasy author Neil Gaiman (American Gods, Coraline) is returning to comics and the character that made him a superstar scribe: Dream, a.k.a. Morpheus, member of the Endless, a deeply dysfunctional family of eternal though not immutable entities with names that begin with the letter ‘D’ who preside over various aspects of human existence (except Destruction did abandon his mantle and dominion and ran away… but never mind). Gaiman — who wrote 75 issues of The Sandman from 1988 to 1996 (all collected in “graphic novel” form), producing one of the most celebrated and most erudite comic book series ever — will team with artist J. H. Williams III (Promethea, Batwoman) for a mini-series that’s set prior to the events in Sandman #1. In that story, an English occult leader inadvertently summoned Dream using a black magic ritual involving rat claws and angel wings on June 10, 1916 and held him captive for 72 years. (The foolish mortal was actually trying to trap Morpheus’ sister, Death, but something went awry. Magic: So darn unpredictable!)
READ FULL STORY

'Buffy' Season 9 spin-off 'Spike': The cockroaches aren't happy -- EXCLUSIVE FIRST LOOK

At the end of the most recent issue of Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Season 9, Spike and Buffy went their separate ways. (Well, it was actually Buffy’s consciousness inside a robot version of Buffy, but let’s not get too technical.) Spike had had it with having his non-beating heart jerked around by Buffy’s inability to fully commit to him, and he blasted off in his spaceship piloted by a loyal crew of giant alien cockroaches. Naturally.

That’s pretty much exactly where the five-issue spin-off miniseries Spike (written by Victor Gischler and pencilled by Paul Lee) starts off, and EW has an exclusive sneak peek at how well — or, really, not well — Spike is handling his self-imposed separation from Buffy.

You can read the full issue when it arrives in stores Aug. 22, but you can check out EW’s four-page first look here.

Read more:
‘Buffy’ comic spin-offs starring Spike and Willow get story details, release dates, cover art — EXCLUSIVE
‘Buffy’ star Juliet Landau writing Drusilla spin-off comic miniseries — EXCLUSIVE
10 Best (and 5 Worst) Movie-Inspired TV Shows

'Batman: Earth One': A fresh take on The Dark Knight -- EXCLUSIVE

batman-earth-2-cover

If you’ve been reading superhero comics for awhile, then you know that Batman’s origin story has been told and retold countless times. Or exactly 913 times, if you have been counting. “915,” corrects superstar scribe Geoff Johns, whose prodigious bibliography includes memorable runs on The Flash, Green Lantern, and Justice League. On July 4, just a couple weeks ahead of The Dark Knight Rises, Johns will add another title to the list: Batman: Earth One, a graphic novel drawn by Gary Frank and yet one more retelling of the caped crusader’s beginnings. But it also happens to be a very good one, marked by a fresh, accessible, emotionally resonant take on the character. “I hope people bring that perception to the book,” says Johns of possible ‘not another Batman reboot’ fatigue, “because I think they’ll be even more surprised if they do.” READ FULL STORY

Anthony Bourdain previews new graphic novel, teaming up with Nigella Lawson

getj-cover

Star chef Anthony Bourdain’s Kitchen Confidential gave Bradley Cooper his first leading role. Perhaps Bourdain’s latest literary endeavor — graphic novel Get Jiro! — will launch another future Sexiest Man Alive into orbit. If the action-packed novel gets the page-to-screen treatment, whoever steps in as vigilante sushi chef Jiro will have to be buff — think Snake Plissken, only with better knife skills and fueled by hamachi.

Bourdain co-wrote the novel with Joel Rose (Kill Kill Faster Faster, The Blackest Bird) and tapped Wizards of the Coast‘s Langdon Foss to create the eye-popping art. Before Get Jiro! hits stores on July 3, Bourdain sat down with EW to talk about his geeky past, what inspired the dangerous Los Angeles seen in the novel, and what’s in store for his two upcoming series. Read on… READ FULL STORY

'Simpsons' creator Matt Groening ends 'Life in Hell' comic strip

GROENING-HELL

Simpsons creator Matt Groening has decided it’s time to pull the plug on his land of anthropomorphic rabbits, announcing the end of his “Life in Hell” cartoon strip yesterday. Groening had worked on the strip, which centered on the lives of several talking bunnies and a gay couple, for over 30 years.

“I’ve had great fun, in a Sisyphean kind of way, but the time has come to let Binky and Sheba and Bongo and Akbar and Jeff take some time off,” Groening explained to Poynter.org. READ FULL STORY

FIRST LOOK EXCLUSIVE! 'Before Watchmen' pins Marilyn Monroe's death on 'The Comedian' -- and a former First Lady

Until now, “Before Watchmen” —  a new DC Comics franchise composed of prequel mini-series to the acclaimed mid-eighties super-hero saga Watchmen — has courted controversy by simply existing. Telling more Watchmen tales without creators Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons? For some fans and industry pros, that’s heresy, regardless of the quality of the work, which so far has been quite good. The next installment in the endeavor is sure to be provocative for another reason altogether. In the opening pages of The Comedian #1 (on sale Wednesday), set in the sixties, the titular character — a morally murky vigilante turned black ops bag-man (real name: Edward Blake) — is not only revealed to be surprisingly tight with the Kennedy clan, but is tasked by a certain iconic First Lady with eliminating a certain iconic movie star famously linked to her husband (and brother-in-law).  The story comes from writer Brian Azzarello (100 Bullets) and penciler J.G. Jones (Wanted), both highly regarded comic book artists known for edgy work.

READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Books

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP