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Neil Gaiman and J.H. Williams III talk Morpheus' father and this week's 'Sandman: Overture'

When Neil Gaiman announced that he would be once again returning to his much beloved comic book series The Sandman with a six-issue prequel series titled The Sandman: Overture, fans rejoiced. There really isn’t anything quite like The Sandman, a 75-issue story about stories written by Gaiman and illustrated by a long list of some of the best artists in comics. Illustrated by J.H. Williams III, one of the most jaw-droppingly gifted artists working in comics today, Overture was to tell the story that immediately preceded the first issue of Sandman, which saw the Master of Dreams laid low—something had weakened him, leaving him vulnerable to human occultists that imprisoned him for 70 years.

However, Overture hasn’t had the smoothest release schedule. Initially planned as a bi-monthly series, the book has slipped to an irregular schedule—issue three was released in July. While the long waits can be frustrating, when an issue does come out, it’s absolutely worth it. Williams’ art is lush, inventive, and ludicrously pretty, while Gaiman’s writing feels like he never quit telling Sandman stories.

With Overture’s fourth issue, available tomorrow, we’re approaching the confrontation between Dream himself and the mysterious force that lies at this story’s end. There’s a city of anthropomorphic stars, an asylum where one insane star resides, and the father of Dream and the Endless makes his first appearance. As things start to build toward Overture‘s conclusion, EW reached out to Gaiman and Williams to talk a little bit more about what readers can expect—and to share a few stunning preview pages.

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'The things you don't want to admit you feel': Scott Snyder previews 'Wytches' #3-exclusive

Over the past five years, Scott Snyder has quickly become one of the most popular writers in mainstream comics—largely due to his stellar, chart-topping run on Batman. But in his creator-owned work, Snyder has displayed a knack for gripping horror stories that double as explorations of very real and relatable anxieties and concerns. It’s horror steeped in humanity.

In Wytches, the Image Comics series Snyder co-created with the superstar art team of Jock and Matt Hollingsworth, the writer isn’t just completely reinventing witches—through the story of the Rook family’s dealings with the titular monsters, he’s diving deep into very real fears about being a parent, and the ugliness that hides in all of us.

In a characteristically honest fashion, Snyder sat down with EW to chat about where Wytches is going, what scares him as a parent, and the things that make normal people become the stuff horror is made of. Come for the interview; stick around for the sneak peek at this week’s Wytches #3.

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DC announces 'Arkham Knight' prequel comic -- exclusive

Rocksteady Entertainment’s Arkham series of Batman games are among the best superhero games ever made. Granted, that’s a bar that wasn’t terribly hard to clear, but the trilogy that began with 2009’s Arkham Asylum and about to conclude with next year’s Arkham Knight has effectively raised the bar sky-high. One of the reasons for the game’s success is the way it subtly remixes the Batman mythos, coming up with a take that’s true to the story beats that everyone knows, but with a texture and feel that is uniquely its own.

Arkham Knight is different. While the previous two games—Arkham Asylum and Arkham City (Arkham Origins wasn’t developed by Rocksteady)—all told original stories, Arkham Knight is the first to introduce a new character, the titular Arkham Knight. As such, a prequel comic is an interesting prospect.

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A look inside the world of 'Bitch Planet' with Kelly Sue Deconnick

Eisner Award nominee Kelly Sue DeConnick knows a thing or two about making your work stand out. The author of acclaimed titles such as Captain Marvel, Pretty Deadly, and Avengers Assemble, DeConnick has a knack for creating stories and characters that resonate with readers. (Look no further than the Carol Corps, a passionate group of fans that sprung out of DeConnick’s re-invigoration of Marvel’s Carol Danvers.) Her latest project—Bitch Planet, out next week from Image Comics—is no exception.

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'Strong in every sense of the word': A Q&A with the creators of 'Strong Female Protagonist'

Strong-Female-Protagonist

Brennan Lee Mulligan and Molly Ostertag had a problem. They were tired of the ways female characters were being portrayed in the majority of comics and science fiction/fantasy literature. They wanted to deliberately shatter some stereotypes with a story of their own—a story about a young woman who is strong in every sense of the word.

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The EW pull list: The best comics of November (so far)

Welcome to the EW Pull List, a regular selection of some of the most interesting comics and graphic novels available. 

At first blush, The Wake—winner of this year’s Eisner award for best limited series—looks like a horror comic. And for a while, it is. But only for a while.

Written by Scott Snyder with art by Sean Murphy, The Wake begins with Dr. Lee Archer, a marine biologist called down to examine a monster at a secret undersea base. What starts as Alien many leagues below the sea becomes something grander in scope, a story about beginnings and endings and survival.

Bringing that story to life is Sean Murphy’s dense, moody linework. Murphy is absurdly talented—his work is instantly recognizable and worth the price of admission alone. That it’s paired with the work of superstar colorist Matt Hollingsworth makes it all the better. Scott Snyder’s story is fantastic too—perfectly paced, it’s both sweeping and personal; a wonderful piece of genre fiction with a real beating heart. READ FULL STORY

'ODY-C' writer Matt Fraction talks about creating a comic epic

Think of Homer’s classic tale, The Odyssey. Now think of The Odyssey, but re-imagined as a gender-bent sci-fi space adventure—and in comic form. Sound intriguing? That’s the premise of Image Comics’ Ody-C, from writer Matt Fraction and artist Christian Ward.

As the Eisner Award winning genius behind acclaimed titles such as Sex Criminals, Hawkeye and The Invincible Iron Man, Fraction is no stranger to crafting narratives that are as smart as the are compelling. But gender-bending one of the most complicated classics ever written? Well, that’s an entirely new challenge altogether.

In advance of the comic’s debut next week, EW spoke with Fraction about bringing ODY-C to life, a little book called Sex Criminals, and that darn half-marathon he just ran.

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First look: Grant Morrison and Chris Burnham's human-hating horror comic 'Nameless'

Announced at the beginning of this year, Nameless is a forthcoming six-issue miniseries by Grant Morrison and Chris Burnham. Described by Morrison as his first full-on horror comic, both he and Burnham have been working very hard to find some of the most terrifying, depraved ideas ever dreamed up for the hero, Nameless, to face. Below, courtesy of Image Comics, EW has an exclusive first look at preview pages from Nameless #1.

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Frank Quitely and Grant Morrison talk about reuniting for 'Multiversity: Pax Americana'

There are a number of reasons why The Multiversity: Pax Americana #1 is one of the most interesting comics coming out this week. First and most obvious—it’s more Multiversity (the fourth installment, for those keeping score.) But it also marks the latest collaboration between writer Grant Morrison and artist Frank Quitely, a pairing that consistently puts out career-defining work. Also of interest is Pax Americana‘s setting—Earth-4, home to the characters DC acquired from Charlton Comics, which were the inspiration for the cast of characters used by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons in Watchmen.

Interested? Below, see some stunning exclusive preview pages and read a Q&A with Morrison and Quitely.

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'Superior Iron Man' plays up Silicon Valley's dark side

Tony Stark is a character who’s supposed to be all about progress and looking toward the future, but there’s one aspect of his character that’s always seemed a little incongruous: He’s a weapons manufacturer. Part of this is necessary for the redemptive arc that makes him a hero—he’s a war profiteer who comes to grips with the effect he has on the world, and decides to take responsibility for it. But he’s also a futurist, celebrated for being one of the most brilliant minds in the Marvel Universe. Stark’s superpower is his genius, and his history in arms manufacturing informs the way he develops technological solutions. But it’s big. It’s corporate. It’s very out of touch.

Superior Iron Man, however, paints a Tony Stark who’s decidedly different—and relevant.

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