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Tag: Children's Books (21-30 of 94)

Watch the trailer for Soman Chainani's 'The School for Good and Evil' -- EXCLUSIVE

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With early readers-turned-fans such as Wicked author Gregory Maguire, Goosebumps author R.L. Stine, and Life of Pi screenwriter David Magee, Soman Chainani’s The School for Good and Evil is one of the most anticipated fantasy YA novels of the year. The first 496-page book in the trilogy — set in a world where two children are kidnapped each year and trained to become either a fairy tale hero or villain — will be published by HarperCollins Children’s Publishers on May 14, and we’ve got your exclusive first look at the appropriately imaginative trailer below. READ FULL STORY

'Girls' guest star Bob Balaban really has written a best-selling series of books about a bionic dog. No, really...

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One of the best jokes on last night’s Girls involved Hannah’s therapist, played by guest star Bob Balaban, mentioning he had written a bestselling series of children’s books about a bionic dog.

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Randi Zuckerberg, sister of Facebook's CEO, signs a two-book deal

The Associated Press reports that HarperCollins has announced a two-book deal with Randi Zuckerberg, the sister of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. Randi is planning to write a memoir titled Dot Complicated, as well as a children’s book. The memoir, which is scheduled for a Nov. 5 release, will provide insight into the digital world. From her time as Facebook’s marketing director to her time as a mother and founder of the Zuckerberg Media Company, Randi will share her experiences with life in the digital age.

“I am thrilled to be working with HarperCollins to share some of my own crazy experiences on the front lines of social media and to inspire people of all ages to embrace technology, as well as the new set of social norms that come along with it,” she said.

Read more:
Author Jonah Lehrer is really very sorry about lying
Author John Green is going to (Google) hangout with President Obama — VIDEO
Donna Tartt’s first novel in 11 years gets title, release date

Anne of Green Gables gets a makeover on the cover of new three-piece set

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Growing up is one thing, but undergoing a complete makeover is something else.

At least that’s what fans of Lucy Maud Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables are saying about the newest cover of the three-piece set published in November. In the books — which are in the public domain and therefore susceptible to any cover — the character is a pre-teen described as having red hair and freckles, and yet the newest cover reveals a very mature blond-haired, blue-eyed young lady running her fingers through her hair. Is this how you pictured Anne?

Read more: 
No more monkey business: Check out the cover for Carl Hiaasen’s ‘Bad Monkey’ — EXCLUSIVE
‘Spiderwick Chronicles': First look at 10th anniversary covers — EXCLUSIVE
‘Sweet Valley High’ to be released on e-reader Tuesday, see the covers now!

2013 Caldecott and Newbery Medal winners are announced

Awards season isn’t limited to those in film and television.

The American Library Association announced its own set of winners today for the best in children’s books.

The 2013 Caldecott Medal, which recognizes picture books, was awarded to Jon Klassen for This Is Not My Hat, a follow-up to his popular story, I Want My Hat Back. This Is Not My Hat is the tale of a small fish with a zealous attitude and what happens when he steals a hat from a larger creature.

The 2013 Newbery Medal for children’s literature was awarded to Katherine Applegate for The One and Only Ivan, which tells the story of an artistic gorilla that lives a caged life in a shopping center and hardly ever misses the jungle. But Ivan’s world is changed when he’s joined by a baby elephant that helps him to see things differently.

Even adults can appreciate the humor and creativity in these award-winning children’s books.

Read more:
10 Great New Historical Books for Kids
Great Books for Kids 4-6
Gary Ross: 10 Kids’ Books I Love

Ann M. Martin picks her top 10 'Baby-sitters' books

What’s the secret to The Baby-sitters Club‘s phenomenal success? According to Scholastic editorial director David Levithan — who began working on the series as a 19-year-old Scholastic intern — it’s simple: “Girls have always connected with The Baby-sitters Club [because] they feel it’s real. It’s not amped up, action-packed drama or mythology or something that has no bearing on their lives,” he says. “And reading the books now, it’s amazing how relatable it all still is.”

Levithan is right. Any girl — any person, for that matter — can empathize with the struggles BSC members faced, from dealing with divorce to experiencing your first major crush. Relive all of middle-school’s trials, tribulations, and triumphs throughout the following pages, in which author Ann M. Martin selects her favorite titles from the 20 BSC books that are getting an electronic re-release in December. Martin has also added personal commentary about each of her picks, which are accompanied by their classic cover illustrations. You want side ponytails? We’ve got your side ponytails right here.

So, which books made the cut? Find out below!

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A sequel to 'The Giver'? It's true -- and here's what Lois Lowry has to say about it

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Before Katniss Everdeen, Tris Prior, and dozens of other teenage characters began raging against dystopian machines, there was a 12-year-old kid named Jonas — protagonist of The Giver, a slim novel first published in 1993 that’s become a modern children’s classic. The Giver was Brave New World for the under-18 set before books about futuristic totalitarian societies became a dime a dozen — and most of today’s popular dystopian stories are in Lowry and The Giver‘s debt.

Middle schoolers and former middle schoolers across the world know that Lowry’s Newbery winner ends on an ambiguous note; it’s unclear whether Jonas and Gabriel, the baby he’s rescued from their colorless community, find the safe haven they’ve been seeking or freeze to death on a hillside. In 2000, Lowry decided to partially answer that question by inserting an oblique reference to Jonas into another futuristic novel, Gathering Blue. Jonas reappeared for the first time as a full-fledged character — albeit under a different name — in 2004’s Messenger, a sequel to Gathering Blue. And today, his saga (and Gabe’s) finally comes to an end with the release of Son, the first direct sequel to The Giver. The novel travels back to the community Jonas fled to tell the story of Claire — a 14-year-old girl drafted to be a Birthmother who finds that she, too, cannot live in a society devoid of love.

Before Son‘s release, I spent half an hour chatting with Lowry about everything from her childhood favorite reads — The Yearling and A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, for the record — to the unfinished Anastasia Krupnik book sitting on her hard drive. Most of our conversation, though, focused on her now-finished Giver quartet. Read on to learn why she elected to continue Jonas’s story, what she thinks about the dystopian trend, and why she believes The Giver has been one of history’s most frequently challenged children’s books. (Want even more? Check our Inside Movies blog for Lowry’s comments about the long-gestating Giver movie.)

Scholastic’s reading guide for The Giver includes an interview in which you’re quoted saying that you would never want to write a sequel–
Uh huh. Oh, how I wish I had never said that publicly! [laughs] It comes back to haunt me. I didn’t have any intention of writing a sequel. I liked the ambiguity of the ending. Over the years, though, it became clear that younger readers in particular did not. The amount of mail I got passionately asking what had happened to Jonas — I suppose after a period of time, it made me wonder as well. So I guess it was in response to the kids who didn’t quit asking and wondering.

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Weekend Book Pick: 'Skulduggery Pleasant' by Derek Landy

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Hey, readers! I’m really excited so many of you were Relic fans. Let’s see if we can continue the streak with this week’s pick. Let me offer a quick disclaimer before we start: This book is actually a children’s book, but it doesn’t read like one (aside from the enormous font) so I hope you’ll give it a chance regardless.

The Choice: Skulduggery Pleasant (2007) by Derek Landy.

You’ll like this if: You’re a fan of Harry Potter or Grimm. READ FULL STORY

Roald Dahl is coming to your e-reader! Which books would you like to see?

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Today would have been Roald Dahl’s 96th birthday — and Penguin Young Readers is celebrating the occasion by releasing electronic versions of eight of his most beloved stories.

Kids of all ages can now stock their e-readers with James and the Giant Peach, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator, Danny, the Champion of the World, George’s Marvelous Medicine, The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar, Fantastic Mr. Fox, and The Twits – an octet of yarns that represent Dahl’s uniquely wicked worldview, as well as his essential humanity. (Just try to make it all the way through Danny without shedding a single tear. Unless you’re a Twit, it’s impossible.) They all cost $6.99 — except George, which for some reason is one dollar more. Maybe the publisher wants to sell fewer copies so that fewer children will be inspired to try this at home?

For any fan of Dahl, this news is exciting. Still, I can’t help but think that this list doesn’t exactly contain the author’s eight best works — who would ever choose the wispy George’s Marvelous Medicine over a fantastically creepy story like The Witches or The BFG?

But clearly, the biggest oversight on this initial e-book list is MatildaREAD FULL STORY

Groups lobby HarperCollins to remove 'Berenstain Bears' books from Chik-fil-A restaurants

How’s this for a book title: The Berenstain Bears and Too Much Fast Food Chicken.

Social change organizations CREDO Action, SumofUs.org, and Faithful America have gathered 80,000 signatures to urge publisher HarperCollins to take Berenstain Bears books out of Chik-fil-A restaurants after Dan Cathy, the CEO of the fast-food chain made statements opposing gay marriage. Following Cathy’s statement, the Jim Henson Company pulled its Muppets toys from Chik-fil-A’s kids meals — the petitioners are hoping HarperCollins will follow suit. READ FULL STORY

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