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Tag: CapeTown (1-10 of 12)

Listen and read along with an excerpt from 'Star Wars: Kenobi' -- EXCLUSIVE

Jedi Master Obi-Wan Kenobi didn’t become a wise old wizard overnight. Yet, his transformation from Jedi leader (who looks like Ewan McGregor) to Luke Skywalker’s mentor (who looks like Sir Alec Guinness) is one that still remains a mystery in the vast Star Wars Expanded Universe — until now. Star Wars: Kenobi by John Jackson Miller is a new Star Wars book starring the ultimate non-parental father figure, Kenobi. Told from Obi-Wan/Ben’s perspective, the tale showcases Kenobi as he settles into life as a distant protector of Anakin Skywalker/Darth Vader’s son Luke on the desert planet Tatooine.

But life on the remote planet is not a restful one — nearby Tusken Raiders led by a ruthless chief and the ever-present threat of the newly created Galactic Empire complicate Kenobi’s mission to keep an eye out for young Skywalker and his family. (In true Star Wars fashion — I have a bad feeling about this.)

James Arnold Taylor dons the same voice he uses to portray Kenobi on the animated series Star Wars: The Clone Wars in this exclusive audio excerpt as Kenobi attempts to reach out to the spirit of his former master and mentor, Qui-Gon Jinn. Star Wars: Kenobi will be available Tuesday, Aug. 27.

 

'The Walking Dead': Exclusive cover reveal of Robert Kirkman's 'The Fall of the Governor'

The third installment in Robert Kirkman and Joy Bonansinga’s Walking Dead trilogy of novels will be released in October by Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press. But you can see the cover for The Walking Dead: The Fall of the Governor exclusively right here and right now. (Click on the “Full Size Image” box above for an even better look.)
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'Superman Unchained' artist Jim Lee on first flights, blue mullets and glorious rubble

The second issue of Superman Unchained  arrives this week with a lot of momentum behind it — the premiere issue finished at the top of the June bestsellers list and reviewers not only gushed, they practically geysered (sampling: “off the chain,” “best in years,” “spectacular art,”  “fast-paced writing and stellar art“).

The project had a lot of pedigree (Scott Snyder weaving the words, Jim Lee widening the wow), some tailwind timing (Superman’s 75th anniversary and the opening of Man of Steel) and a admirable “anything goes” spirit. (The first issue’s kooky double-sided poster pull-out might be the perfect rebuttal to slabbing puritans but is that why it cost $4.99?)

With all of that, it seems like the perfect time to check in with Lee, the affable superstar who launches DC heroes into the sky by night (with his marathon all-night art sessions) and steers the corporate ship during the day (as co-publisher of DC Entertainment).  Lee lives in San Diego County so Comic-Con International will be a home game for him and it will be the only place fans can get a special edition Superman Unchained No. 1 with a black-and-white Lee image showing Clark Kent turning into Superman.

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Neil Gaiman on the spooky art of writing -- EXCLUSIVE

The same day Neil Gaiman’s The Ocean At the End of the Lane hit No. 1 on the New York Times bestseller list the author’s book tour made a stop at the Alex Theatre in Glendale, Ca., where he was joined onstage by Entertainment Weekly’s Geoff Boucher for a lively 80-minute conversation about the spooky art of writing.

Gaiman did a reading from the slender new release and (in a surprise) also from Fortunately, the Milk, an endearingly daft children’s book due in September.

The event, put on by Live Talks LA, is presented in its entirety below and reveals the unexpected path of The Ocean at the End of the Lane and the reason its protagonist resembles the author far more than the central characters in his best-known works, which include Coraline, The Graveyard Book, Stardust, Neverwhere, American Gods and The Sandman series for Vertigo and DC Comics.
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Watch the book trailer for 'William Shakespeare's Star Wars: Verily, A New Hope' -- EXCLUSIVE

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“In time so long ago begins our play/ In star-crossed galaxy far, far away.”

This isn’t your parents’ Star Wars. It’s more like your ancestors from the Old World’s Star Wars. Author Ian Doescher reinterprets the classic space opera into a classical play written in the majestic style of the Bard of Avon. William Shakespeare’s Star Wars: Verily, A New Hope takes all of the characters you know and love and has them speaking in asides, soliloquies, and poetic verses. Even Chewie and Artoo roar and beep in iambic pentameter. For an exclusive look at what’s in store, check out the trailer below: READ FULL STORY

Read an excerpt from 'William Shakespeare's Star Wars: Verily, A New Hope' -- EXCLUSIVE

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“Darth Vader, only thou couldst be so bold.”

Carrie Fisher may inexplicably have a bit of a British accent during the beginning of Star Wars: A New Hope, but this latest genre mash-up puts the epic space opera in the hands of the Bard himself. Debut author Ian Doescher blends protocol droids with iambic pentameter in William Shakespeare’s Star Wars: Verily, A New Hope.

Tapping into the vein of Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, William Shakespeare’s Star Wars follows the basic structure of the original Star Wars film but molds it according to the style of a Shakespearean play. Lord Vader still seizes the spaceship of Princess Leia of Alderaan in search of the Rebellion’s plans against the Galactic Empire. C-3PO still cries and complains about everything. R2-D2 still beeps and buzzes — but this time in flowing verse.

So if you’re a fan of Stormtroopers and/or soliloquies, check out Act I, scenes 1-4 of William Shakespeare’s Star Wars below: READ FULL STORY

See 10 images from 'Vader's Little Princess' and 'Darth Vader and Son'

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In Jeffrey Brown’s apocryphal but oh-so-cute re-imagining of the Star Wars universe, Darth Vader is a doting father to younglings Luke and Leia, even though he’s still totally evil and trying to take over the galaxy. Vader’s Little Princess, which comes on the heels of Brown’s Darth Vader and Son, released on April 23 and became an instant best-seller. Click through to see why Vader’s Little Princess and Darth Vader and Son may make great Father’s Day gifts.

FIRST UP: College talk

Furor over Orson Scott Card's anti-gay views drives 'Superman' illustrator to leave comic

Celebrated science fiction author Orson Scott Card also happens to be a fervent, outspoken opponent of same-sex marriage — and now the controversy sparked by his unpopular views has affected Card’s upcoming Adventures of Superman project.

Card has been opposed to gay marriage for decades; in 2009, he joined the board of directors of the National Organization for Marriage, a conservative group dedicated to “protect[ing] marriage and the faith communities that sustain it.” When DC announced last month that Card would co-write an issue of Adventures of Superman, the news immediately stoked fan ire. A petition urging DC to sever ties with Card has garnered over 16,000 signatures on the LGBT activist site All Out; other supporters of gay rights have called for a boycott of the comic itself.

Yesterday, the brouhaha prompted artist Chris Sprouse to leave the Superman project altogetherREAD FULL STORY

A revealing new book collects 'Comics About Cartoonists': Dark, happy, surreal, suicidal

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Sean Howe’s recent history of Marvel Comics: The Untold Story was only the latest chronicle of one theme that runs through every honest assessment of the lives of comic book artists: That they have been since the dawn of the industry underpaid, overworked, and exploited. Add to this the art-world prejudice that these men (and they were mostly men, at least in the 1950s/60s world of superhero, horror, and romance comics) are lesser talents than fine artists, and you can see why the gorgeous, poignant new book Comics About Cartoonists: Stories About the World’s Oddest Profession, edited and designed by Craig Yoe (IDW/Yoe Books) exerts a potent fascination. READ FULL STORY

Stephen King unearths origin of 'The Shining' sequel 'Doctor Sleep' -- EXCLUSIVE

A man never outlives his father.

That’s a line from William Faulkner, but it applies in earnest to Danny Torrance, the psychic little boy from Stephen King’s The Shining.

King is revisiting the now middle-aged Dan Torrance in the sequel Doctor Sleep (out Sept. 24) which finds him working at a hospice, where he uses his innate supernatural powers to ease the suffering of the dying. Dan may have survived his old man’s madness (and swinging mallet) in the hallways of that long-ago snowbound hotel, but he has grown up to realize that not all demons can be escaped. Some are a part of you.

In a wide-ranging interview with Entertainment Weekly, King reveals the origin story behind Doctor Sleep, talks about the fatherhood fears buried in The Shining, and speculates about what could become of his stories when he’s long, long gone …

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