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Tag: CapeTown: Comics (1-10 of 48)

'The Walking Dead': Exclusive audio from the new book -- NSFW

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The fourth and final installment in Robert Kirkman and Jay Bonansinga’s Governor-related Walking Dead book series will be available next Tuesday when The Walking Dead: The Fall of the Governor, Part Two is released in both print and audiobook formats. The novel will feature the final face-off between Rick Grimes and Philip Blake, and you can get your first taste right here and right now with a clip from the Macmillian audiobook version read by Fred Berman.

But be warned! This clip not only features massive zombie and human carnage — as evidenced by lines like “ragged bodies collapsing in a synchronized line dance of death” — but also some major NSFW language. Like, we’re talking multiple uses of multiple curse words. So grab some headphones and prepare yourself for a harrowing alley encounter between the living and the undead that may or may not end with a bit of nostril stabbing. And for more Walking Dead scoop, follow me on Twitter @DaltonRoss. READ FULL STORY

'Boxers & Saints': Gene Luen Yang talks East-West culture clash, plus a hidden gem of comic's Golden Age

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American Born Chinese writer and artist Gene Luen Yang is no stranger to adolescents grappling with big questions. But now he’s taking his insight for the humor, drama, and pain of young adulthood from history. His latest graphic novel Boxers & Saints follows the parallel tales of two Chinese teens who grow up through the Boxer Rebellion. The two-book collection, which hits shelves Sept. 10, views the early 20th century rebellion on both sides of the struggle, from the perspective of the Boxers and the Christian converts.

Yang, who also writes the Avatar: The Last Airbender series of graphic novels, spoke to EW about his latest ventures and how he needed a superhero-sized breather while tackling such a devastating and defining event.
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Check out an excerpt from the graphic novel epic 'Boxers & Saints' -- EXCLUSIVE

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In his first solo graphic novel since the National Book Award finalist American Born Chinese, writer and artist Gene Luen Yang takes on the often overlooked Boxer Rebellion and transforms history and legend to the page in the dual volume graphic novel, Boxers & Saints.

The two-book parallel narratives depict the late 19th century-early 20th century uprising in China through the eyes of two young characters, Little Bao and Four Girl/Vibiana. The first, Boxers, follows the journey of Little Bao, who leads a violent rebellion against the “foreign devils.” The second, Saints, tells the tale of Four Girl as she embraces the foreign religion Christianity as it offers her a sense of identity and self-acceptance.

Read on for an exclusive excerpt of the first book, Boxers, as Little Bao learns the “ritual” from Master Big Belly in order to invoke the power of the gods — in a style reminiscent of the power of Grayskull.

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'World War Z' scribe Max Brooks' 'The Harlem Hellfighters: A Graphic Novel' cover revealed -- EXCLUSIVE

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They may not be crazed zombies hungry for brains, but it’s still probably a good idea not to mess with the soldiers of the 369th Infantry Regiment. The stars of World War Z scribe Max Brooks next project, The Harlem Hellfighters: A Graphic Novel (out April 2014), are the soldiers of one of the most decorated regiments of World War I.

Illustrated by Canaan White, the graphic novel centers on the real 369th Infantry Regiment, an African-American regiment from Harlem, New York that fought throughout France during WWI. Stepping away from the zombie lit scene, Brooks shares the often overlooked story of these soldiers nicknamed the Harlem Hellfighters.

Ready to fight through hell with the Harlem Hellfighters? Sound off in the comments below!

'Batman Beyond 2.0': Kyle Higgins talks new digital comic series, his dream movie version

Like headstones in a cemetery, the streets of Gotham City are a logbook of past tragedy and loss. History won’t stay buried in Gotham, and that makes the far-future especially tantalizing to storytellers like Kyle Higgins.

Higgins, best known for his work on Nightwing, visits that future in Batman Beyond 2.0 (now on sale), the digital series that revisits the mythology of Batman Beyond, which aired for 52 episodes (1999-2001) on The WB and presented a future where young Terry McGinnis wears the mask and the aging Bruce Wayne is (like Gotham herself) the stone-faced monument that never forgets the painful past. We caught up with Higgins by email:

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Batman Beyond began on TV as an animated series, but it has since put down roots in the comics world through the sheer ingenuity of its ideas. What’s your sense of the place it holds now, and does it still need to “win over” DC readers?
KYLE HIGGINS:
That’s a great question. First, as it relates to Batman Beyond 2.0, we’re actually continuing Terry’s adventures from the animated series. So all the continuity of the cartoon stands, and I’m doing my best to make the book feel like it’s nothing less than a lost season of the show. We’re not connected to the New 52 in any way.

I say that, because it’s a question I’ve gotten a lot since we announced the book. To me, that speaks of the passion that fans have for Terry McGinnis and his Gotham City. I may be wrong, but I feel like a lot of DC readers presume — and embrace — that Bruce’s story will one day lead to some a version of Batman Beyond. A couple months ago, Scott (Snyder) had a scene in the Wayne Enterprises trash compactor that featured Bruce putting on a “scrapped prototype” suit in order to escape. It was jet black, and had a big red bat on the chest. From what Scott and Greg (Capullo) said, fans really dug it. As a fan myself, that made me quite happy to hear.
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'Genius': Albert Einstein is graphic novel's inventive variable

The term “prodigy” is an open blue sky when it arrives but in the instances when excellence has an expiration date the word is more like a clinging black cloud. That’s one of the themes in Genius, the new graphic novel from First Second Books and the tandem of writer Steven T. Seagle and artist Teddy Kristiansen, the same duo that delivered the Eisner-winning It’s a Bird back in 2004.

Genius introduces physicist Ted Marx a one-time wunderkind whose career is now more mass than energy, which is confounded by his inability to solve the emotional equations of being a husband and father. Marx finds a possible reprieve when he sees a chance to steal a secret discovery made by Albert Einstein. That opens the story up to the arrival of Einstein as a voice and with that Genius becomes a clear contender for the title of year’s most inventive graphic novel.

To find out more we caught up with Seagle, who is also a partner in Man of Action Studios, the collective best known for Ben-10 and its success for Cartoon Network. READ FULL STORY

Chuck Palahniuk announces 'Fight Club' sequel -- as a graphic novel

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It seems like Chuck Palahniuk has broken the first rule of Fight Club. Tyler Durden is back — but not in the way you may think. Fight Club author Palahniuk has announced a graphic novel sequel to the 1996 satirical novel that inspired the cult 1999 David Fincher film starring Edward Norton, Brad Pitt, and Helena Bonham Carter. Originally announced when Palahniuk answered a question regarding his upcoming work during the 2013 San Diego Comic-Con panel “Ode to Nerds,” Palahniuk followed up on his official website, confirming his intention to create a graphic novel serialized sequel to Fight Club.

In a statement on his website, Palahniuk describes the series’ premise.

It will likely be a series of books that update the story ten years after the seeming end of Tyler Durden. Nowadays, Tyler is telling the story, lurking inside Jack, and ready to launch a come-back. Jack is oblivious. Marla is bored. Their marriage has run aground on the rocky coastline of middle-aged suburban boredom. It’s only when their little boy disappears, kidnapped by Tyler, that Jack is dragged back into the world of Mayhem.

Palahniuk also states that fellow author Chelsea Cain has introduced him to creators and illustrators from big-name comic book publishers from DC, Marvel, and Dark Horse, but no illustrator has been announced. Also, no publisher has confirmed the release of the graphic novel as Palahniuk aims to work out the sequel’s story before settling on a publisher.

The author is hoping a release date prior to 2015, but due to contractual obligations, fans may have to wait until 2015 before reading the continuing misadventures of Jack and Tyler.

'The Walking Dead': Exclusive cover reveal of Robert Kirkman's 'The Fall of the Governor'

The third installment in Robert Kirkman and Joy Bonansinga’s Walking Dead trilogy of novels will be released in October by Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press. But you can see the cover for The Walking Dead: The Fall of the Governor exclusively right here and right now. (Click on the “Full Size Image” box above for an even better look.)
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Comic-Con first look: New 'Sandman' cover by Dave McKean

Neil Gaiman’s Sandman gets an intense spotlight this week at Comic-Con International with a silver anniversary celebration and new details about Sandman: Overture No. 1, the October release that marks Gaiman’s first Morpheus story since 1996.

We’ve got two First Look images from that first issue below — the Dave McKean cover and the page one interior art by J.H. Williams III — but first a bit of background.

A whisper can be louder than a shout in the right setting at that was the case back in 1988 when Sandman No. 1 hit shelves and spinner racks with a Dave McKean cover that showed mixed-media ambitions, cryptic images, and a muted approach to color and text — all very strange in an era when the average DC Comics cover was about as subtle as an air-raid siren.

The story inside was worthy of the special treatment. In it writer Neil Gaiman introduced a pale, otherworldly figure: Morpheus, an imprisoned dream lord who yearns to break free and return to his kingdom.

Escape he did and that issue began the landmark 75-issue run that left fans dizzy with it’s breadth and imagination.  Now Gaiman is the one returning to his kingdom of imagination and McKean has another compelling cover to herald it. (Mouse over the image to get a magnified look.)

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'The Fifth Beatle': Brian Epstein gets his moment in new graphic novel -- EXCLUSIVE

The Fab Four wouldn’t have been the Fab Four without the genius of the man Paul McCartney called the “fifth Beatle” — Brian Epstein. Epstein discovered the Beatles and guided them through their path to fame with a mix of marketing madness, business savvy, and inspiration. He died at age 32, just as the band was seeing the height of their success, but he’s getting his due (finally!) in a graphic novel that will debut at Comic-Con. Titled (fittingly), The Fifth Beatle, the story follows Epstein and the band through their early days in Liverpool, their first record deal, and Epstein’s epic 1961 proclamation that “The Beatles will be bigger than Elvis!” The novel also focuses on Epstein’s life apart from the band and his personal struggle with being gay in a time when homosexuality was still a crime in England.

Check out an exclusive trailer for the graphic novel below, complete with ’60s fashion homages and a dreamy score by record producer David Kahne.
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