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Tag: Books Into Movies (31-40 of 55)

'My Week with Marilyn': How the book stacks up to the movie

My-Week-Marilyn-book

Marilyn Monroe was such a big star at her height that one young man’s brief encounters with her spawned not one but two memoirs, which in turn inspired a feature film that’s currently generating Oscar buzz. The two books by the late Colin Clark both document the author’s experiences at the age of 23 as the third assistant director — or really, as an errand boy — on the conflict-ridden, six-month-long shoot of The Prince and the Showgirl starring Monroe and Laurence Olivier. His first book about the shoot, The Prince, the Showgirl, and Me (1995), consists of his day-to-day, fly-on-the-wall journals of his on-set observations. The second book, My Week With Marilyn (2000), takes a deeper look at a magical nine-day period (mentioned just briefly in the first book) in the middle of that six months in which Monroe lured Clark into a semi-romantic affair. While the two books — published only five years apart — take a markedly different stance on Monroe as a person and an actress, My Week With Marilyn the movie, as the title would suggest, adheres very closely to the book of the same name, although it draws some expository details from the first book as well. Weinstein Books, the publishing arm of the studio that produced the film, has released the two books in one volume for the first time. Whether you have or haven’t seen the movie, is the book worth reading? (Minor spoilers ahead). READ FULL STORY

'Shatter Me' author Tahereh Mafi talks her debut dystopian novel

Shatter Me, 23-year-old Tahereh Mafi’s YA debut, hit shelves Nov. 15. It’s been out a little more than a week, and Shatter Me is already a hot commodity in the book world — as of now, the foreign rights have been sold in 19 countries, and 20th Century Fox already purchased the film rights.

Set in a dystopian society, Shatter Me follows Juliette, a girl who has the ability to kill people with a single touch. She’s been locked away for 264 days, and the crumbling government wants to use her gift/curse as a weapon.

Mafi took some time out of her busy schedule to answer a few burning questions about the Shatter Me trilogy series.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: How did you come up with the idea for Shatter Me? READ FULL STORY

Mark Burnett on new 'CliffsNotes' animated web series (see a VIDEO clip here)

Survivor producer Mark Burnett has teamed up with CliffsNotes, AOL, and Coalition Films to create an animated series based on classic books to make literary mainstays such as Shakespeare and Dickens more accessible to teens. Like the print versions of CliffsNotes, they’re geared to students who may either want an overview before starting a book — or, just as likely, procrastinators who haven’t read the book right before a test.

Burnett got involved in the project after seeing a need for this sort of content. “There’s no question that there’s no replacement for reading the actual books,” he told EW. “But kids do use CliffsNotes worldwide, no question about it. It amazed me that there was no digital version of these CliffsNotes.” In addition to being quick and informative, the series aims to engage its audience with humor. Burnett describes the first six Shakespeare titles the team has produced as “irreverent, animated, comedic shorts combining Shakespearean lauguage with real, modern high school and college American slang talk.” A cartoon superhero named Cliff is your guide to the videos, and he doesn’t hesitate to call you an “idiot” if you haven’t read the book yet. READ FULL STORY

'Moneyball': Love the movie? Read the book by Michael Lewis

moneyball

Even if you already saw and loved Moneyball this weekend, it’s still worth your time to read the book by author and financial journalist Michael Lewis. The movie does a great job constructing a narrative from what appears, on first glance, to be a somewhat un-cinematic story, but the source material drives home some of the thematic points in ways that the movie can’t. Reading the book after the movie doesn’t feel like a retread, but rather a closer look at Billy Beane (played by Brad Pitt) and his Oakland A’s.

People who, like myself, hate baseball will be surprised by how much there is to enjoy in this book (see also: The Art of Fielding). Moneyball isn’t just about baseball; it’s about baseball statistics. On the surface, there’s no worse hell imaginable than having to stare at a page of player facts and figures (I just had to remind myself via Google what “RBI” stands for), but it’s a testament to Lewis’ reporting and writing that the chapter I found most riveting, even inspiring, was about Bill James, the Baseball Abstract author and statistician who inspired Beane’s seemingly counter-intuitive player recruiting philosophy. READ FULL STORY

Veronica Roth's 'Insurgent' cover revealed -- EXCLUSIVE

Insurgent

Veronica Roth made her YA debut earlier this year with Divergent. And even though the sequel won’t hit shelves until May 2012, EW has the exclusive cover reveal for Insurgent today. But there’s even more! We also got Roth to answer a few questions about the trilogy. Don’t, however, expect her to give away too much — Roth remains tight-lipped about what’s coming up in book 2. Read on to find out how Roth came up with her trilogy, the success of the series, and what book 3 will not be called.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Where did you come up with the idea for Divergent and the subsequent trilogy?
VERONICA ROTH: I came up with the idea when I was driving to Minnesota, where I spent my first year of college. I was just listening to a song, and an image of someone jumping off a building, but not for a self-destructive reason, popped into my head. When I thought about why a person might do that, I came up with the first faction — Dauntless — and also the story of a person within that faction. READ FULL STORY

'Wildwood' by Colin Meloy of The Decembrists optioned by 'Coraline' studio

Wildwood

Laika, the animation studio behind Coraline, has optioned Wildwood, the middle-grade fantasy novel by Decembrists lead singer Colin Meloy, Variety has announced. Wildwood centers on a girl named Prue McKneel, who is forced to leave the flannel-and-coffee-house world of Portland, Oregon, and enter the bordering “Impassable Wilderness” after her brother is kidnapped by a murder of crows READ FULL STORY

First chapters revealed from romantic time-travel thriller 'Tempest' -- EXCLUSIVE

The most important element of any time-travel story is the rules: what can the hero do, what’s impossible, and how does messing with the past change the future?

What we find in this exclusive excerpt from the opening of Tempest, the debut YA novel from Julie Cross, is that its cocky, time-shifting 19-year-old protagonist doesn’t understand the rules himself, and is struggling to figure out this strange, apparently instinctive power — though, like most kids that age, he’s not all that serious about his potential until trouble strikes.

Click here for a link to the first four chapters of the book, which comes out in its entirety Jan. 3, and let us know what you think in the comments.

Expectations are high for the novel, which has already had its film rights optioned by Summit Entertainment, the studio that produces the Twilight films. By releasing such a significant portion of the book four months early — and for free — publisher Thomas Dunne Books is, sort of like the hero of Tempest, hoping some actions taken in the past will positively influence the future.

See below for more theories on the excerpt.

READ FULL STORY

'Hunger Games' author Suzanne Collins wrote for 'Clarissa' -- what do Clarissa and Katniss have in common?

One’s a starving, militant rebel living in a post-apocalyptic world. The other is a fashion-forward teen thriving on a bright Orlando soundstage. What do they have in common? One clearly versatile writer: Suzanne Collins.

Ever since reading The Hunger Games, I’ve been intrigued by the fact that the same woman who wrote such a gritty, violent series also wrote for the fizzy, neon-colored sitcom Clarissa Explains It All (and also for The Mystery Files of Shelby Woo, which I think is sort of underrated). Collins didn’t create Clarissa, but I’m sure she lived and breathed Clarissa while she worked for the show, just as she lived and breathed Katniss while writing the novels. We’ll learn about Collins’ journey from Clarissa to Katniss in the upcoming comic book about the author’s life, but for now, it’s fascinating to see ways in which the 90′s Nickelodeon heroine could have inspired the very different teen who made Collins famous. Okay, all of this is a huge stretch, and it’s easier to think of ways they almost-might-be similar but are completely different, but here goes: READ FULL STORY

'Everything Must Go' director Dan Rush on adapting Raymond Carver

For his feature debut, director-screenwriter Dan Rush built Everything Must Go around the central concept of Raymond Carver’s 1977 story “Why Don’t You Dance.” But Carver’s story, as Rush puts it, is “pretty dang short,” so he had to make some bold creative choices to beef up the narrative. (Some other notable Carver adaptations: Robert Altman’s Shortcuts and Ray Lawrence’s Jindabyne). It’s a bold choice, generally, for any filmmaker to adapt Carver’s work. His stories typically center on disaffected, working class individuals in a gray-skied America; he writes with economical prose (kept even snappier with the help of editor Gordon Lish), and his characters rarely say what they mean. Rush spoke to me about the tall task of creating a cinematic arc out of a very short Carver story, and his decision to cast Will Ferrell in the main role of Nick Halsey. Everything Must Go is available on DVD Sept. 6. READ FULL STORY

On the Books Aug. 23: Neil Gaiman's HBO deal for 'American Gods,' Kathryn Stockett's legal battle centers on handwritten note

++ Novelist Neil Gaiman has nabbed a deal with HBO to adapt his most successful novel, American Gods, into series for HBO. Gaiman told a crowd at the Edinburgh International Book Festival that he plans to write the pilot, the finale, and perhaps some episodes in the middle. He joins Sloane Crosley, Michael Chabon, Ayelet Waldman, and Tom Perrotta in the slate of authors recently tapped by HBO to try their hand at writing for television. Echoing Salman Rushdie’s praise of cable television as a storytelling medium, Gaiman said, “I was doing a couple of screenplays, and was incredibly grumpy at the idea of doing 124-page stories with beginnings, middles, and ends and was determined that the novel should be formless and would have lots of ends, and several beginnings, and middles all over the place. So I actually like the idea that HBO are doing it.”

++ As in the best-selling novel and hit film The Help, words are proving unexpectedly powerful in author Kathryn Stockett’s real-life legal battle. READ FULL STORY

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